Was my 1954 Summaron 35mm 3.5 made before "Goggles"?

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by steve_hoffman|3, Sep 23, 2000.

  1. Just purchased (on Ebay, of course), a complete 1955 M3 kit, with 3 lenses and the whole nine yards. This time machine setup even has the hang tag and Leitz lens guarantee. You get the picture. Everything mint-. The 35mm Summaron has no attachment at all. I've been told that this lens (#1258952)was made before the goggles were furnished. In that case, how do you use the lens? Guess? The Army MD that owned this kit was very careful with it and I doubt he would have overlooked this issue. I just don't see how he used the lens. Anyone??? Thanks, Steve Hoffman
     
  2. Steve,
    I consulted my Hove pocket book and can verify that your lens was
    indeed produced in 1955. Also the first M series camera to accept a
    35mm lens without the need of a finder is the 1958 M2. The first
    year for the 35mm f3.5 Summaron to have "eyes" is 1956. Yours just
    missed the cut off.

    <p>

    Up until that time, to use the M3 with 35mm lens, you needed to have
    a finder that slipped into the shoe on top of the camera. I had both
    the "eye'd" and non "eye'd" summarons, both f3.5 and 2.8, and
    preferred the small shoe mounted finder. I found the "bug eyes" too
    disruptive to the clean design of the camera. This is just my
    opinion, based totally on cosmetics. In a pinch I have also used my
    straight 35mm lens on my M3, without any finder, simply by moving my
    eye around the finder, out to the metal frame rather than the
    illuminated frame. It works pretty well, but you don't get parallax
    correction... At or near infinity, no problem. These days, you can
    find pretty good finders made by Cosina for their Voitlander
    cameras. Leica finders are sparse in the 35mm range.

    <p>

    Also be aware, the bug-eye'd and straight 35mm lenses have different
    cams. If you take the eyes off of that type of lens, it doesn't
    focus accurately... as I found out trying to steamline my "eye'd"
    lens. The eyes and the cam variation work together to assure focus.
    Your current summaron lens will work on any M camera... even the M6.

    <p>

    Enjoy your new camera!
     
  3. Steve,

    <p>

    From "Identifying Leica Lenses", by Sartorius:

    <p>

    "The Summaron 35 f/3.5, in production up to 1946 in the screw-mount
    version, was produced also in the bayonet-mount version for the M3
    from 1954." (Actually another SM version of the 3.5 f/3.5 Summaron was
    produced from '46 to '60.) "But these cameras were predisposed for
    only 50, 90, and 135mm focal lengths and so, for the 35mm, it was
    necessary to use a supplementary mirror viewfinder, SBLOO,which was
    inserted in the accessory shoe. Later, the Summaron 35 f/3.5 was
    furnished with an additional special viewfinder (commonly known under
    the name of "glasses") with which the field of the viewfinder of the
    M3 was increased to cover the angle of view of the 35mm focal length."

    <p>

    By the way, I also use a 35 3.5 Summaron with a IIIf I found in mint
    condition. Great little lens. I also picked up a collapsible 50mm
    Elmar f/3.5 to go with it. I have not had so much fun with a camera
    in years. But the IIIf's viewfinder is also for the 50mm focal
    length, not the 35mm, and a bit squinty on top of that. So I recently
    got the new Voightlander 35mm accessory viewfinder. I looked at an
    original Leitz brightline 35mm accessory finder (very expensive!, even
    when you can find one), and decided to go with the Voightlander unit.
    It's just wonderful; extremely bright and clear, and the brightline
    framing lines are quite accurate and easy to use. Good eye relief and
    no more squinting. Makes the 35mm Summaron a joy to use.

    <p>

    Good luck with your classic. Sergio.
     
  4. Thanks Al and Sergio for the instant response! Guess I'll get the
    Voightlander 35mm finder unless someone out there wants to sell me an
    original Leitz finder> Thanks again.
     
  5. Leica has reintroduced the 35mm finder to go with its LTM
    35mm lens offerings. It uses the the 28mm finder body and
    optics with the framelines appropriately smaller. I have even
    spotted one up for sale used already.
     
  6. An even better option is a used Leica Imarect finder, for all lenses
    from 35-135mm. This will give you virtually exact 100% framing
    between three feet and infinity, not at just the three feet distance
    which the M-3 frame lines are based on. Used, generally less than
    $100 in near mint condition. (Incidentally, the bug-eye 35s also
    give 100% framing at infinity.)
     
  7. Bill, Thanks for your info. I found a Leica Imarect finder on
    Ebay. I assume that there is just one model for both screw mount and
    M mount Leicas? I ALSO see a Waltz for Leica finder on Ebay that has
    a groovy little case (EBay #441932243). The collector in me of
    course wants THAT one. Would it work? Thanks!
     
  8. Waltz would work, but only the Imarect gives 100% exact framing.
    There's only one model for both M and Classic, but over the years it
    changed which lenses it covers. You want the one for 35,50,85,90,
    and 135. Many of them are a little "foggy" appearing, you want one
    which is perfectly clear and no little black paint specs floating
    inside, there are plenty of them around so don't be misled.
    Incidentally it works from 3.5 feet (one meter) not 3 feet, which
    reminds me, be sure to get one calibrated in feet not in meters!
    Regards, Mitch.
     
  9. From what I remember about the Imarect is that the 35mm frame is not
    too good for the glasses wearer. Most of them seem to be not very
    clear optically too (dirt and fog). That includes mine. I take the
    point though that it does correct parallax (assuming you remember to
    do it and have the time). I also have a Russian one that is fine
    although it does have some barrel distortion around the edges. I used
    it with the 35mm 2.8 Summaron (an excellent lens).
     
  10. Hi, everybody!

    <p>

    It would be very interesting for me to identify my LTM Summicron 35mm
    F2.0, # 1631461. I am a shooter, not a collector, and do not have a
    good information guide except Hove pocket book. Some years ago I
    purchased this lens in Germany in ex+ condition. I use it on MP4 and
    IIIf and get razor-sharp pictures. This lens has screw-mount &
    bayonet-mount facilities. The bayonet-adapter is fixed to screw-mount
    with a tiny screw. As Hove says, LTM Summicron was in production from
    1958, only 577 units were produced. In 1958 only one LTM 35mm
    Summicron was produced. I referenced the number of my cron (1631461)
    exactly to 1958. Pardon my language. Any comments would be
    appreciated.
     
  11. Sorry, I have placed my question in the "Ask a question"
     

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