Turning camera on & off. Do you do it all the times?

Discussion in 'Canon EOS' started by alex, Feb 11, 2010.

  1. I find my self usualy not turning my camera on and off since I like to have it ready at all times and a bit of lazyness as well. But it came to me that not doing that does not make the cleaning sensor do it's job so I'm making a effort to do the on and off to benefit from the feature.
    What are your thoughts about it?
    Regards,
    Alex
     
  2. I only turn my cameras off when I'm changing lenses (to try and reduce the attraction of dust to the sensor) and when I put them in the bag (just so an errant shutter press doesn't fire of a bunch of frames or drain the battery).
     
  3. Yes -- only when changing lenses and removing the CF card.
     
  4. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    I don't turn the camera off unless I'm putting a way for a few days. I've never bothered when changing lenses or cards, and the people I work with don't either. Nobody has ever said anything bad happened from not turning it off, and these are people who may be shooting six cards in a night.
     
  5. I leave it on if I'm out shooting so it will be at the ready. If I'm taking a shot that I can take my time with I will turn it off and back on to give the sensor a final shake down. When I'm done shooting for the day I turn it off.
     
  6. I rarely turn it off.
     
  7. Only when I'm done for the day/night.
     
  8. Never heard about the changing the lens thing. I guess I just learned something new. How effective is the cleaning sensor feature under normal circumstances?
     
  9. Rarely turn off my camera.... I like to have it handy most of the time and ready to go...
    I do shut it off for changing cards and lens. More of a habit then anything else...
     
  10. I don't think I've ever turned mine off...
     
  11. this is interesting.... the on/off lever is right under my thumb, it takes 1/10 second to flip it.... there are times when I've left it on and let it time out, but the idea of leaving it on indefinitely has never crossed my mind for a moment, and I can't think of a reason to start now. maybe I'm a freak. I guess the bottom line is that it really doesn't matter, do what you're comfortable with.
     
  12. And...if you go into the menu you can set it to power down automatically after a minute of disuse. After that you just have to tap the shutter button lightly and it comes back from the dead. Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff would have loved this feature.
     
  13. Wayne I know that. The issue was about the sensor cleaning function, if you manually turn it off then the sensor or something else will vibrate to supposedly clean it self.
     
  14. I just go thru the menu and tell it self clean once a month or so...
     
  15. Only when I'm putting it away in the drawer, which can be a few days to weeks. But when it's out and about, it's on and always ready to shoot.
    <Chas>
     
  16. I rarely turn it off. Only when using my battery grip. I've found that when leaving my camera (20D) on while having the battery grip attached (an eBay thing), the batteries are drained within two days (even while it's sitting on a shelve somewhere).
    Also, sometimes autofocus and aperture control are lost when I'm using my extension tubes (ones with the electrical contacts connected). A power cycle will usually restore control of the lens.
    I always leave it on then changing lenses or CF cards.
     
  17. I sporadically turn it off for the very reason you mention. With the 7D, so far, so good (knock wood)...no dust spots.
     
  18. When I used to do audio engineering, entire control rooms were left on, permanently, forever. Something about turning electronic components off and on being bad because the initial power up gives a burst of voltage and that's where most of the "wear" on electronics happens... in layman's terms...
     
  19. I turn mine off every time I change lenses, remove memory card, change battery, or add/remove flash unit. Otherwise once my camera is turned on for a shoot it stays on. I was told this years ago from a long time camera repair dealer and have never had (fortunately) a component breakdown.
     
  20. My experience is that built-in sensor cleaning is only partially effective on dust, and not effective at all on fluid or grease-based deposits. I have Canon gear. Others may work differently, but the built-in cleaner on the 1Ds, 1D, and 7D don't do a whole lot for me. To clean I use firstly the air blow, and secondly the Arctic Butterfly, then a very gentle cotton swab clean. As a last resort I take it to a pro shop. The pro shops advise me to just turn it off, and not because it means more business for them - they've helped me with my own cleaning technique. So for me I just save the electronic pulses and keep the sensor clean setting to off.
    I keep the camera on all the time until the day's shoot is over, except when changing lenses or cards, and every once in a while leave it on during lens change due to time constraints. Never had any issues.
     
  21. I was told you should turn your camera off when changing lenses because having the camera on gives the sensor a static charge that attracts dust. Is this wrong?
     
  22. I only turn my cameras off when I'm changing lenses (to try and reduce the attraction of dust to the sensor)​
    The shutter still covers the sensor when you remove the lens, so I don't think that having the power on presents any significantly greater risk.
     
  23. I don't know about your cameras, but opening the compact flash drive door on my 50D turns off the camera, so I suspect that little step isn't necessary.
     
  24. This topic got me curious so I talked with Canon tech support. Their response was that it was best to turn off the camera every time you add or remove a component as the on/off switch is very rugged. They said the camera (I was just referring to the 1D series so this may/may not apply to all bodies) is not in any harm when changing lenses or memory card). They mentioned that sometimes the camera can lock up if while in the process of changing a lens you also hit the DOF or shutter button. No damage occurs but temporary electronic insanity occurs (remove battery to reset). Their only recommendation was that the camera should be turned off when changing flash units as damage can occur since a signal is always present at the bodies' flash shoe contacts.
     
  25. "I was told you should turn your camera off when changing lenses because having the camera on gives the sensor a static charge that attracts dust. Is this wrong?"
    Back when I first starting using Digital SLR's - I was instructed by the Canon Rep to always turn off the camera before changing lenses, also I believe it says it somewhere in one of the manuals for the Camera - just for the same reason. Dust will accumulate, especially in high dust/dirt area's. Beaches, deserts and even forest have lots of particles floating around.
     
  26. batteries sure are a PITA. i'm going next month to shoot ice sculptures in fairbanks, AK. if it's the other times i've been there it will be about minus 15 F with a bit of a breeze. and it could be even colder! certain cameras used to have external battery packs, with a cord where you could keep the battery in your pocket. but i had so much trouble in the past with excessive battery drain, this time i'm taking a voigtlander bessa rangefinder [mechanical shutter; only the meter doesn't work if the battery dies] and a rolleiflex [no battery or meter] for use with time exposure tripod shots at night. and a panasonic lumix DMC-LX2 and mamiya 7 [battery dependent] for quick shooting during daylight hours... and extra batteries.
     
  27. I am very old school. I take a picture, and turn off the camera.
    Every time!
    Am not in the habit of using a camera for numerous images, take the picture
    or series of pictures and when complete turn the camera off.
    Suspect it is an old habit, conserve batteries for they can be sometimes difficult to recharge or replaced when somewhere remote. The other things was one brand of Pentax; the light meter was always on, so it was imperative after making the exposure to cover the lens. Otherwise next time the light meter battery would be dead.
     
  28. I usually turn the camera off when swapping cards. Mostly as a safety check on my part to make sure the camera is not still writing to the card for some reason.
    Otherwise, it stays on until I put the camera away for the night.
     
  29. I was changing lenses one time with the power on and I saw sparks between the lens and camera contacts. I did not think that was a good idea, so I turn off power any time I change lenses, cards or flash. I also put the camera away with the power off.
    Phil
     
  30. "I was changing lenses one time with the power on and I saw sparks between the lens and camera contacts."
    That can't be good.
     
  31. I leave mine on 90% of the time.
     
  32. i always turn my camera off. is there any harm in doing this so many times?
     
  33. I turn off my 5D when putting it back in the camera bag and often between shots.
    With my first digicam, a Nikon Coolpix 990, I turned it on and off so many times the on-off switch failed. Fortunately it was still under my extended Mack warranty.
     
  34. a very interesting question-thanks for posting it Alex. I have always kept it off between shots but I think that I am going to have to reconsider this; time for an old dog to learn a new trick! regards, cb :)
     
  35. I only turn my camera off if: 1). I know I will be moving or stationary and NOT shooting. Otherwise I keep it ON (or have set the longest auto-off to its longest setting if the camera has such a setting). 2). As previously mentioned, I add/change/remove a component.
    Keep in mind. If your camera has a built in flash the thyrisor will dump its charge when you turn the camera off thereby wasting battery power.
     
  36. I only turn my camera off if: 1). I know I will be moving or stationary and NOT shooting. Otherwise I keep it ON (or have set the longest auto-off to its longest setting if the camera has such a setting). 2). As previously mentioned, I add/change/remove a component.
    Keep in mind. If your camera has a built in flash the thyrisor will dump its charge when you turn the camera off thereby wasting battery power.
     
  37. Most of my cameras don't have an on/off switch!
     
  38. When I am finsihed, put it in the bag or change lenses. No sensor to worry about. I have a camera with a sensor but I don't use it so it's is just off all the time without a battery in it. But if I were to use it I would treat it the same way. I have no interest in worrying about a sensor. It's a 2 minute process to swab a sensor.
     
  39. I have been had a couple of bad experiences with batteries dying right when a great shot presented itself, usually after a full day of shooting walking around Istanbul or Cairo or some such, admittedly usually because I forgot to bring an extra battery or recharge or something. In any case, because of that, I have always been very careful and I turn the camera off after every single shot and I don't use the LCD to review and delete (I mean, I look at the shot of course, but I don't go through them and delete bad ones or look to see what I have).
     
  40. Interesting array of responses. I might not start turning it off after every shot. Definetly for flash change (although with the 7D and it remote flash trigger) I barely put the flash on the camera a few times, I may adopt the lens changing policy as well.
     
  41. Funny... I find it trivial to turn off when not in use and turn back on instantly as I bring the camera up to eye level. But the Rebels have a very convenient power switch. When I use an XXD or better, I just leave it on... the power switch requires more deliberation on those models.
     
  42. Always off when I am not using it and never on when I change lenses.
     
  43. hmmmm - I normally keep it off when not in use. interesting to note that in the discussion so far, there was only one person doing this way - I always thought on saving battery life but looks like it doesnt matter since so many people dont turn it off ? But how about global warming ? am I helping on that front either ?
     
  44. Frank, you must be using a pinhole camera then :)
     
  45. or a Leica...
     
  46. When changing lenses or cards...with digital; with film, only for storage.
     
  47. I only turn them off at the end of the day.
     
  48. I only turn my camera off when changing lens, changing CF card or when finished for the day.
     
  49. I don't usually turn off my cam, The only time I turn it off is when I put it in my bag and I'm on the move, The reason is, my cam have built in battery grip with shutter button and a dial, I observed that the dial could turn and the shutter button could be pressed when inside the bag and I'm on the go. Which could drain the battery, Otherwise I don't turn off my cam when removing lens, battery and card.
     
  50. I started SLR photography with a Minolta XD-7, which has an electronic shutter, but no on/off switch. When I got my first DSLR - a Rebel XT - I stayed in the habit of never turning off the camera. Coming from a manual focus system with prime lenses, I am in the habit of changing lenses a lot, and since I had only two 1MB CF cards, I also needed to change cards a lot. Leaving the camera on never caused me a problem in 3 years. And neither with the XD-7 nor the Rebel XT have I ever had a single accidentally exposed frame from putting the camera in the bag while turned on. I don't say it can't happen, but it hasn't happened to me in 30 years!
    Since I got my Rebel T1i, I occasionally switch it off to get the benefit of the sensor cleaning thingy, but it's mostly when I play around with the camera in an idle moment and happen to think of sensor cleaning. I always switch it right back on ;-)
    Frank
     

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