The trouth about negatives?

Discussion in 'Casual Photo Conversations' started by sblain, Jul 26, 2009.

  1. The trouth about negatives? Pleas correct me if I am wrong, ever sins I started shooting film with my Nikon EM my photos never really satisfied me, at first I though it was the cheep (Likon 200) I was using, then I tried a few Kodak and Fuji negatives with very similar results. This week with the help I got here on this site, I played with my exposure via (asa dial) and I got excellent color rendition from my cheep Likon film, be it Interiors outdoors or knight scenery my colors are now very pleasing. So my question is; properly exposing whatever film your using more important then the brand of film itself?
     
  2. SCL

    SCL

    Yes in a sense. The characteristics of films allow some exposure latitude...more latitude for negative films, less latitude for slide (positive) films. There are many other characteristics of films which are important to people and influence their choices of films (grain, speed, saturation, resolution, etc.)...but the basic assumption is that you must expose it properly to achieve desired results with the film. It sounds like you need to do some reading up on the basics of exposure, the interaction of shutter speeds and aperture, how over or underexposure affects various films. For a start, look up the Sunny 16 rule and memorize it. Everything you do in terms of measuring exposure by natural light (not flash) can be easily related back to this rule, and photographers who master the interpretation of light on their subjects have an easier time achieving desired results.
     
  3. it could be that the meter in the fm is off or it could be that the shutter speeds are off. ai can also be poor proscessing or a bad setting on the digatil printer that most labs use today next to no one prints on the old paper with chemistry now.
     
  4. << So my question is; properly exposing whatever film your using more important then the brand of film itself? >>

    I would think this is the first step. Then some film may have certain special characteristics that you may prefer over the others. For example, Fuji Velvia offers saturated colors, especially on the green and blue colors. Kodak is rich on earth tones, etc. Film with lower ISO/ASA has finer grain; higher ISO/ASA provides coarser grain, etc.
     
  5. Yes, correct exposure is critical; less so with negative films but more so with transparency film.
     
  6. Properly exposing paper/film/sensor... whatever photographic material is the first step. Or creatively exposing (and developing) in various oddball ways but you have to know the correct, or middle ground, way before that.
    Pretty much all new films can give you at least acceptable results. Even the cheap ISO 400 stuff. Beyond speed film choice is more like fine tuning and personal preference.
     
  7. Hears my view regarding my Nikon EM.

    First this is an aperture priority camera only, meaning I choose the aperture and the camera chooses the speed for proper exposure.

    The way I see it I should be able to select whatever aperture I wish to express a desired artistic expression (more or less dept of field )
    The camera will select speed and tell me if I am not within proper range.

    Isn’t this calculation based on the sunny 16 rule?

    Next; this camera has no exposure compensation dial, the only way to compensate is the asa dial. This is probably why Nikon incorporated the 2stops button on this camera. Sins I started shooting my asa200 film at asa140 I get very good exposure and colors in most conditions, right now my only problem is the absence of an exposure lock.

    I think the camera is in perfect working condition and the lab is not at fault in any way, I just needed some quality time to get in touch with this little wonder, it really saddens me to think this camera will end up in my closet because of one little button.

    thanks
    rgds
     
  8. Did you use Matrix metering (not Spot) on an average non-contrasty scene? If the exposure is still off, perhaps it would be wise to have a camera repair shop take a look. Good luck!
     
  9. "The camera will select speed and tell me if I am not within proper range.
    Isn’t this calculation based on the sunny 16 rule?"
    No, metering just tries to get things to a neutral gray no matter what the weather is.

    Next; this camera has no exposure compensation dial, the only way to compensate is the asa dial.
    I found that all my old Canon SLR's (B+H fd35, AV-1, and two T-400s, had the same problem, that they tended to underexpose by about 2/3 of a stop. I had to do the same thing at about the same level of adjustment. Lucky you have an ASA dial (HEY WE INVENTED IT!) instead of the automatic film canister readers. As long as it's consistent, you're good.
    And yes, exposure really is the most important thing. If everything is burned out or in dark shadow with no detail, there's not much you can do with it, especially with slides.
     

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