Tamron SP for SPecial

Discussion in 'Classic Manual Cameras' started by davecaz, Jun 7, 2018.

  1. While researching an old lens I was planning to put on eBay, I noticed a quote from Herb Kepler praising the lens for being "greatly superior in sharpness" compared to similar zooms. According to Johan J Ingles-Le Nobel on extreme-macro.co.uk, "At 80mm and f5.6 to f16 this lens is tack sharp, especially at close focusing distances which is unusual. It thinks it is a prime."

    TamSP_20180607_151324-SM.jpg

    The lens is the Tamron SP CF Macro 35-80mm Adaptall 2 zoom lens. Mine came with a Contax adapter, but I've never gotten my RTS III cleaned/fixed (the viewfinder looks like there's a camo net over it), so I'd never payed any attention to this lens. I didn't know of its reputation when I got it with some other stuff. It doesn't look like much, as you can see. And, while I know Tamron make some fine lenses, I knew nothing about this one.

    I have a number of Adaptall 2 adapters, including one for my Canon EOS cameras so, after seeing the reviews it gets, I decided to test it out before selling it off. TamSP_20180607_151237-SM.jpg

    I'd have to say that it deserves its reputation for excellence, based on my informal testing.
    20180607-6759-SM.jpg
    I did NO post-processing, at all, other than the normal import sharpening. This was shot handheld at 80mm for 1/320 at f/8 and ISO 1600 (because I was using it inside, and forgot to change it when I went outside) with the front element of the lens approximately 3 inches from the flower. This is one macro zoom that really IS a macro! And it doesn't rely on switches or buttons to put the lens into "macro mode". You just keep turning the focus ring as you move closer.

    And here's a 100% crop from it. It's just as sharp as 200%, and almost as sharp at 300%, which tells me that this may be the sharpest lens I've ever owned.
    20180607-6759-SM-2.jpg
    Here's one of the indoor shots that convinced me to do more testing. 1/60 at probably f/2.8 and ISO 1600, probably also around 80mm.
    20180607-6737-SM.jpg

    And one more, with the same settings. It's not particularly the sharpness in these shots that made me investigate further, but the color rendition and "the look". I realize that is a useless descriptor, but I don't know how to describe it. It's partly the apparent depth, partly the illusion of 3-D, and probably some other factors. If you can describe it better, I'd love to be educated on this.
    20180607-6738-SM.jpg
    I actually took it with me when I went out to run some errands, hoping to grab some more test images, but my battery went from half-charged to dead in about six shots, most of which were out of focus, because I was wearing the wrong glasses. But, the end result is that, since they don't command the prices they're worth, you won't be seeing mine on eBay any time soon.

    TamSP_20180607_151237-SM.jpg

    TamSP_20180607_151237-SM.jpg
     
    marc_bergman|1 likes this.
  2. Nice results. This lens has long enjoyed it reputation for good performance.
     
  3. Bugger! Didn't see the duplicate images until too late.

    Thanks, Mike.
     
  4. You've discovered one of Tamron's better known gems. The SP 35-80 has an outstanding reputation. I resisted picking one up for years because it's "only" a 35-80mm focal length, but eventually I succumbed and added a nice example to my Tamron collection. Glad I did because it is one incredibly sharp lens. The 35mm end is great for street photography and the lens is small enough where it is relatively unobtrusive. The 80mm focal length on the long end makes it suitable for portraiture, but it's almost too sharp for portraits. I've found that, unless the subject is very young with no facial wrinkles or blemishes, people can be put off by images that are "too sharp." Eh, a filter with a smear of Vasoline on it works wonders.

    Congrats and enjoy!
     
  5. Thanks! I expect to. I agree about the range being a tad short, but the macro abilities make that less painful. I may try using this as my walk-around lens on my 6D for awhile, instead of the 24-105, which is about twice its size.
     
  6. SCL

    SCL

    Years ago I picked one up to use on a recently acquired Leica R3, not wanting to invest in a Leica lens to start my journey with this body. I was impressed, and then used it on my other manufacturers' bodies....23 years later I still have and use this lens...on both film & digital bodies; it is an impressive lens for the era.
     
  7. Well, that's a heck of an endorsement! 23 years! And yet, you can buy one for $50 or less.
     

Share This Page