Sync Problem with Canon 80D and AB800

Discussion in 'Lighting Equipment' started by friskybongo, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. Hi All,

    I’m having a problem with syncing my Canon 80D to my Alien Bee B800. I have the AB standard 15-foot sync cord going from the 80D (with a hot shoe adapter mounted) directly to the B800. One night all was well but the next night the unit failed to flash. I switched out the B800 with a 2nd unit and also used both a different sync cord and hot shoe adapter to no avail. I know the flash is not defective because I can manually release it using the flash test button. I made sure all connections were firm.

    Could it be that somewhere in the process I inadvertently disabled something in the 80D’s menu system?

    Any suggestions?


    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. AJG

    AJG

    I'm not familiar with your Canon 80D, so I can't help you there, but I can tell you that going to radio transmitters/receivers for my White Lightning X series studio flash units changed my life for the better. The Buff transmitters/receivers have worked really well for me and I don't miss dealing with sync cord gremlins one bit. Do you have a Paramount sync cord tool? I found it to be extremely helpful with troublesome sync cords, when I used to use them on a daily basis. One other thought--if the outlet that the flash is plugged in to for power isn't grounded properly that can sometimes lead to erratic/non functioning sync cords.
     
  3. Thanks AJG, I'll try another electrical outlet.
     
  4. AJG,
    All fixed! Rookie mistake. Actually, the 15-foot sync cord was NOT firmly attached to the Alien Bee. Everything works well now. I feel so embarrassed. Thanks again for taking the time to respond.
     
  5. I agree with AJG, the AB cybercommander is worth it's weight in gold. I no longer climb ladders in a dark studio to adjust lights. It allows turning on aad adjusting flash and modeling light power. A bit of a learning curve, but once it's automatic, it allows for instantaneous adjustments without interrupting the flow of the shoot and the subject losing the mood.
     

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