Sigma telephoto model designation

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by rick_kalamaya, Mar 18, 2012.

  1. It seems like a few months ago there was a discussion about a Nikon telephoto lens, and there was a link by an expert to a comparison he wrote in another site or mag comparing the Nikon lens to the (I carefully wrote this down) Sigma 70-200 f 2.8 EX DG OS HSM. After reading the review I decided that at approx. $1,000 less, the Sigma lens would be fine for me, pretty much an amateur.
    So recently I ordered the Sigma lens. I am an aspiring birder on the doorstep of retirement. But after ordering the lens, I see there is a Sigma lens with the same labels and features except the model or whatever is preceded by "APO". And I am unable to find out what that means. The lens I bought from the listing does not have these letters.
    I intend to use the lens on my Nikon D5000. Any information would be appreciated.
     
  2. But after ordering the lens, I see there is a Sigma lens with the same labels and features except the model or whatever is preceded by "APO". And I am unable to find out what that means.​
    Did you look on the Sigma website?
     
  3. APO is an abbreviation of the word Apochromat a lens that focuses all wave lengths of light to the same point.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apochromat
    Looking at Sigmas web site the APO lens has been discontinued and been replaced with one that does not have the APO designation. With the quality of the Sigma 70-22 I do not think I would be worried about it having APO on it or not.
     
  4. For sure, Sigma has only one model with OS (=VR in Sigma talk), which is the latest and according to tests best version. So, I'd recommend looking out for the OS designation first and foremost.
    (by the way, I'm not a dedicated birder, but in my experience: 200mm is a bit too short for many birds...)
     
  5. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Right, APO means apochromat, which is similar to Nikon's ED (extra-low dispursion) lens elements to reduce chromatic aberration. Sigma and Leica use the APO abbreviation.
    The latest Sigma 70-200mm/f2.8 has the lable: APO DG USM with Optical Stabilizer (OS), which is the equivalent of Canon IS and Nikon VR.
    I reviewed that lens for photo.net a year ago: http://www.photo.net/equipment/sigma/70-200/review/
    00a9nz-451179584.jpg
     
  6. Yes, Mr. Cheung, that is the review that motivated me to act recently. Thanks for all the info. This hobby is fascinating. Difficult, but fascinating. And I feel a lot better this morning.
     
  7. "200mm is a bit too short for many birds"
    who can resist a challenge? :) :) :)
    Osprey below was shot @ 200mm on a full-frame camera. Image is uncropped straight out of the camera.
    00a9oz-451189584.jpg
     
  8. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Allen, so what is your point? You happen to have one image where the bird happens to be close enough so that you managed to capture it with a 200mm lens on FX. But having one exception does not mean 200mm is long enough for bird photography in general. Unfortunately, that will be the challenge the OP will face using the 70-200 on the D5000 for bird photography.
     
  9. Shun, did you see the three smileys?
    I agree, 200mm is essentially a wide angle lens for most bird photographers. I am not a birder. A birder friend of mine uses a D300s, Wimberly Gimbal mount, 1.4 or 1.7x TC, and 400 f2.8 for most of her work. That's an effective focal length of 840-1020mm. Unfortunately that setup is expensive and out of reach for most people. I don't have a 400 f2.8 either, so I have to live with what I've got.
    In my case, I was fortunate enough to find a large bird (6' wingspan) and got pretty close. It's an existence proof that you don't need to spend $10k on a lens to do bird photography.
     
  10. Well, I have learned enough to sense that the lens won't be perfect for birding. But in the commentaries I have read, this lens is a good all round telephoto for a fellow like me. So I do hope I get lucky as did the above photographer. I am taking this one step at a time. Maybe the big dollar telephoto is in my future, maybe not. But this discussion is terrific. By the way the dealer responded to my inquiry with the info that the lens I bought WAS an APO lens.
     
  11. Maybe, the OP is using it on a V1? Thus the birding quote.... :)
     
  12. Okay, I got the lens. Now I am not able to mount it on my Nikon D5000. Clearly the white dots on the camera and the lens don't match up. And I have carefully tried to rotate the telephoto lens around the Nikon mount but nowhere does it engage so far. Ideas??
     
  13. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Okay, I got the lens. Now I am not able to mount it on my Nikon D5000. Clearly the white dots on the camera and the lens don't match up. And I have carefully tried to rotate the telephoto lens around the Nikon mount but nowhere does it engage so far. Ideas??​
    That makes no sense. Did they send you a Nikon mount version?
    I happen to have a couple of images of the mount area of that lens in my Sigma lens image folder when I reviewed that lens. Does your lens look anything like that in the mount area? For example, the Canon EOS electronic contacts are very different from Nikon's.
    http://www.photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=998908
    That same lens is also available in Canon EOS, Pentax, Sony and of course Sigma mount. The rest of the lens should look the same but the mounts are different.
     
  14. You know when I viewed the listing it did mention a "Sigma" mount as I recall. Is that mount much different than the Nikon? The listing said it was compatible with the Nikon.
     
  15. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Rick, in case you have anything other than a Nikon-mount version, it will not mount on your D5000 or any Nikon SLR/DSLR.
    Do you mind taking a picture of the lens mount of the lens you received and post that here, similar to my image here?

    [​IMG]
     
  16. I tanked this one. The listing clearly says "for Sigma". The listing also listed Nikon as compatible but the pic you have posted shows the contacts as little nibs and the lens I have has contacts that are not the same. It is the wrong mount. Thus the fate of the ignorant. I wasn't really aware Sigma made cameras. So I suppose I either rely on the good nature of the seller or somehow make a trade. It is the wrong mount.
     
  17. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

  18. Shun:
    I believe I bought a new lens and the return on the box was Sigma. I cannot tell you how much I appreciate your help. This is has been and will continue to be a learning experience.
    Rick
     

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