Should I add a Second Hasselblad Body to my Kit?

Discussion in 'Medium Format' started by jon_kobeck|1, Jan 7, 2012.

  1. I recently shipped off my 501C body to David Odess for a CLA. I feel a little naked not having a Blad with me now.
    It takes a few weeks to get it back.

    So this whole experience got me to thinking. It would be nice to have a back up body for situations like this. It would
    also be nice to have a second body with a different lens mounted to switch back and forth.

    I have always been a one camera guy. My opinion is that I can only shoot with one camera at a time, and buying
    multiple bodies is a waste. Better off putting that money in lenses.

    A body is not expensive, especially an older 500 C or similar. But then thats another body that will require routine
    maintenance, cleaning etc. Im not sure how much use it will get. Im NEVER going to carry 2 cameras with me in the
    field at once. Its a matter of grabbing one and going. Perhaps Im better off adding more backs for different films?
    As a side note, my main and favorite lens is the standard 80mm. That is the lens I use 99% of the time.
    I tried a 50 for a while, but I didn't like it, I found it was too wide for the kind of photography I do.
    I would like to pick up a 120 Makro soon. The 120 and the 80 for me would be the ultimate kit. So the real question is"
    should I have that 120 mounted on a second body or not/

    So this mental debate has prompted this post.
    What do most of you folks do?
    Do you have multiple bodies?
    Do you think that a "serious" photographer needs to own more then one camera. I am curious.
     
  2. mtk

    mtk

    Hi Jon,
    I consider myself a "serious" photographer. I shoot 35mm, digital, and MF. I currently have (3) RB67 bodies for my MF kit. I really only shoot one. The chances of even one of my RB's going down is extremely low. I simply purchased them because I when I saw the price of them I simply could not pass it up. My Nikon F3 could probably survive a Tornado easily....but then I have my Fe and Fm and F100 as "back ups".
    If you feel it would be "convenient or just in case" you probably will not use it much if at all. My advice is spend your money on glass.
    I have found over the years that film stuff is a "relavtively" inexpensive hobby that can get carried away in a hurry.
    I am finding that simply shooting my RB with the 90mm and the F3 with the 50 are very enjoyable and I really don't need anything else.
    I am in the process of thinning the herd soon. Much easier decision on what camera to use today!
    Have Fun, I know how you feel!
    Mark
     
  3. stp

    stp

    I've always been a one-body photographer as well. For the first time, I now have two Canon bodies. It was wonderful to have two different lenses mounted on two camera bodies at the same time during my last outing. However, I use a variety of lenses, and I very often shoot from a vehicle (i.e., the vehicle is very close by). If I were in your shoes of using one lens 99% of the time on a relatively heavy body, I'd be most tempted to get a good walk-around digital camera (e.g., Fuji X100) for those times I didn't/couldn't have my larger system with me.
     
  4. With the price of used Hasselblad gear as depressed as it is, why not get a 2nd body. You don't need a prism for it, just the standard WLF. Although I would get a 500CM rather than a C.
    As for shooting with 2 bodies. If you change lenses a LOT, then keeping one lens on each body makes sense. Then you are not changing lenses so much. If not, keep the 2nd body tucked away as a spare. One less thing to carry around with you.
     
  5. Though shalt have backups.
    I never go on vacation without one for good reason.
    Ulrik
     
  6. david_henderson

    david_henderson www.photography001.com

    I always take a second camera, in case one breaks. In the first year or two after buying my first Bronicas I had two overseas trips significantly affected by camera body failure and I don't want that again when I may have spent $000 getting and staying at my destination. The backup body does not go out with me, but stays in my hotel/car so that I can switch within a few hours of failure. OTOH the backup has become the main body for a few months at a time- no point having a backup that you don't know will work if you need it.
    There is no point thinking about a second body for another lens when you admit that you'll never carry two bodies into the field. In any case how long does it take to change lenses, and how often are you in environments where changing lenses might not be a good idea? Blowing sand? Spray?
     
  7. Another consideration might be getting a more recent body with the floating mirror, it is much better when using any long lenses. Fortunately, or unfortunately because of their cost, I have accumulated a few pieces of each beacause I used to photograph full-time, and I still have a pair of 180mm lenses each mounted on a floating mirror body. I had an older 500cm and a 501c like you as a pair for a while and both had the regular mirror and it was really annoying to me because when working fast I couldn't see the whole frame with the 180mm. So eventually I sold the 500cm and bought a 501cm which has the mirror that floats, and again later a 503cw that has the ttl flash capability. In your case I'm pretty sure the 501cm would be the earliest and simplist one to consider.
     
  8. Subject matter should be one of the reasons to make your decision. I'll never forget the day I was shooting a wedding and one of my "Blads" tumbled from the pew to the hard tile floor of the church. Toast, but the second body in the care had me shooting again within two minutes.
    If the situation would be irretrievably lost if the body suffered a melt down, you need a back up.
     
  9. Subject matter should be one of the reasons to make your decision. I'll never forget the day I was shooting a wedding and one of my "Blads" tumbled from the pew to the hard tile floor of the church. Toast, but the second body in the car had me shooting again within two minutes.
    If the situation would be irretrievably lost if the body suffered a melt down, you need a back up.
     
  10. If you have a second anything you will never need it, that's a good enough reason to do it.
     
  11. "So this mental debate has prompted this post. What do most of you folks do? Do you have multiple bodies? Do you think that a "serious" photographer needs to own more then one camera. I am curious."
    For wedding and sports photographers a second body is mandatory. Nobody will hire you without a second body. If you are working for yourself, it is not mandatory, but you are taking a huge chance if your equipment fails. Then there is the possiblity of legal action against you.
     
  12. I hate to say on a public forum, how many Hasselblad bodies I have, but you can practically buy them for peanuts. I always keep spare magazines loaded with the same film I'm shooting, so I don't have to load them in mid shoot. Normally, EL bodies are what I use, but it is awfully nice to use CM bodies for tagging around town. Another reason I have spare bodies is because I almost always have one in for a CLA because I rotate them over a two year period. I finally was able to acquire every lens in the lineup, so if I need to send a 50mm in for repair, I can use a 60mm. Or a 150mm can cover for my 120mm if needed. It's the lenses I have more concern with having spares. When a body needs a CLA, it will usually pull through a shoot. When a lens fails, you're pretty much done with it until it is repaired.
     
  13. I have multiple bodies. It has come in handy when shooting star trails, as individual exposures run into hours, it added the ability to increase the number of pictures I could shoot on the rare moonless nights with clear weather. My first body was a 500C/M. I then got a 503CW for flash metering and a 2000FCW for multiple exposures to give my kit some added flexibility for specific projects.
     
  14. When looking for a used 501C or CM body, with back and waist level finder preferably, what price anne
    should one expect to be in? This is assuming it will need a CLA
     
  15. I'm not current with prices, Jon. Sorry!<br>Just wanted to chime in to avoid possible confusion: you do not need a 2000-series (or any other) camera specifically to be able to make multiple exposures on a single frame of film. You can do that with all V-System cameras.
     

Share This Page