Shooting into the sun (intentional lens flare)

Discussion in 'Portraits and Fashion' started by chris_serio, Jun 29, 2009.

  1. I've seen a lot of photographers use the sun to help give their pictures a warm yellow/orange haze. I've witnessed this being done with no flash at all. I cannot seem to duplicate the results though. My shots seem to just have a white haze instead of the warm colors.
    Can someone offer some techniques to achieve this result? What metering is best? Where do you meter? Do you intentionally overexpose/underexpose after metering?
    Here's some samples of what i'm trying to achieve.
    Thanks in advance.
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  2. There's a wedding photographer I follow that just did a pretty detailed explanation of this process. Check her post out here -> http://www.melissajill.net/index.cfm?postID=569&Behind-the-image-flare
     
  3. Thank you for the reply. That was an informative URL but doesn't exactly answer my question. The lens flare seems to be fairly easy to obtain but the glow is what i'm after. My pictures come out washed out and white while a lot of the ones i see online have a nice orange glow to them. I'm sure this is easy in post processing but i've seen it done right from the camera. That's the trick i'm trying to learn.
     
  4. You would use a warming filter to get the warm glow. Or you can set the color temperature on your camera to a much cooler temperature (Starting point around 7500 degrees). This will fool your camera into creating a much warmer looking photo.
    Also, you aren't supposed to post someone else's photos-only link to them.
     
  5. The time of day is also important. The first photo was taken near sunset, you can tell by the long shadows, which gives a naturally orangish color to the light. The other two are either early morning, or early evening when the light is still fairly bright and not so orangish. The bottom photo either used a reflector or flash for fill light.
     
  6. Try setting the WB to shade or cloudy if you want to warm up a shot into the sun. It also works great in warming up landscape sunsets.
     

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