Shooting fast speed film in the day, is it possible?

Discussion in 'Beginner Questions' started by 10986431, Jan 19, 2021.

  1. Hey all

    I have been lucky enough to get hold of a couple of boxes of 3000 iso black and white polaroid peel apart thats been kept refridgerated and working super well. I would love to shoot some of this in the day but my camera doesn't shoot fast enough it seems for the film. Is there anything that can be done to step this down in any way to enable this?
     
  2. Sandy Vongries

    Sandy Vongries Administrator Staff Member

    Don't know your camera, (or Polaroid cameras much at all) but I seem to recall there were some press on ND if you can't stop down enough, and other filters available for some Polaroid cameras. Someone may know more.
     
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  3. I'm using 4x5 film in a graflex speed graphic. Oh so an ND filter should help me slow the iso down. Is there a particular one I should get and is there a way to calculate the new iso when using one. This is amazing if so!
     
  4. Sandy Vongries

    Sandy Vongries Administrator Staff Member

    The ND filters I have used come in stops, the Nikon ones range from half a stop to thirteen and a half. I have used primarily ND 2 (1 stop) and 4 (2 stops) A question of setting your meter for your film, measuring the light, adjust speed & F stop, apply filter factor and go on as usual.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2021
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  5. SCL

    SCL

    You need to determine the filter size to fit your camera body. ND filters typically come in filter factors of a power of an f/stop; so for 1 f/stop you want a 2x, for 2 f/stops a 4x, 3 f/stops a 8-9x, etc. I don't know what apertures or shutter speds you have available on your camera. but if you use the sunny 16 rule of thumb, where on a sunny day (in the USA...(may be different in other locales) at f/16 your shutter speed should be the reciprocal of the film speed. it is pretty easy to determine how strong your ND filter should be. For instance you said the ISO of your film is 3000... so a 2x filter would be the equivalent of a film rated 1500, a 4x filter would be the equivalent of a film speed of about 800, and a 8-9x filter would be the equivalent of a film speed of about 400. Of course these numbers aren't exact, partially due to the spectral sensitivity of the film and transmission of the filters, but this should give you enough info to get you started. Good luck.
     
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  6. Wow amazing thanks so much SCL and Sandy Vongries, this is awesome! I guess I'm getting an ND filter or two!
     
  7. Do you really want to shoot wide open? IDK where the Speedgraphic's FP shutter tops out. - 1/1000sec? If so f32 should make your day.

    If you plan sticking to BW photography why not get orange &/ red filters instead of ND?
     
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  8. Sandy Vongries

    Sandy Vongries Administrator Staff Member

    Colored filters dramatize monochromes - you may want that, or not, ND filters just reduce incoming light but render contrasts normally..
     
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  9. An ND 16 (minus 4 stops) filter effectively reduces your 3000 ISO to a more manageable 180 ISO.

    Except technically it doesn't. The film speed stays exactly the same, but the amount of light reaching it is reduced. You're changing the exposure, not the speed of the film.

    Pedantic? Maybe, but I think it's important to realise that the ISO of a film emulsion is 'baked in' during manufacture, and there's little you can do to change it.
     
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  10. Sandy Vongries

    Sandy Vongries Administrator Staff Member

    Sounds familiar.
     
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  11. Why waste such a rare survivor on daylight shots?

     
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  12. Just trying to counteract this apparent misconception by the OP.
     
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  13. Ok this is all so helpful thanks. Let me get some filters.

    @jdmvw I totally agree. The issue is I’ve never actually shot any of the 4x5 in the day and don’t have any I can do never experienced it. For a few shots I’d love to try it in the daytime. If I had a lower iso film that could do this I 100% would but as it’s all I have I thought it would be ok for a couple. A very very valid point though.
     

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