Schneider 80mm companon-s for 6x7 printing

Discussion in 'Medium Format' started by sucai_bi, Aug 16, 1998.

  1. Thinking of buying Schneider Componon-S 80mm f4 for 6x7 printing. According to Schneider brochure, it covers up to 6x6 format only.
    Has anyone tried using this lens enlarging 6x7 negative with success?
    I use Sauders/LPL 670 enlarger and have the recessive lens board for medium format lens. Comments on this combination appreciated. TIA.
     
  2. Because I had a 6x6 camera before I got my 6x7, I bought a Componon-S 80mm/4. I have had no problems printing 6x7 negs with it. However, I have not printed larger than 11x14, and none of those were full-frame. Print size matters because, the larger the image, the closer the lens must be to the negative to achieve proper focus, and that can increase light falloff, or vignetting.

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    And there are other considerations. Printing full-frame means printing the physical corners, so that also contributes to light falloff. If you typically crop a fair amount of your negatives, you may never notice a problem. The choice of lens aperture also has a dramatic effect; larger apertures result in more falloff than do smaller ones. And you'll need larger apertures for larger print sizes. Finally, no matter how proper the lens and how perfect the enlarger, *some* light falloff will occur. That is inevitable.

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    To quantify the matter, I ran a quick test on my setup. For my MF work, I use a Philips PCS130 with the PCS150 tri-color head. I put a 6x7 neg in the carrier and set it up to project an 11x14 image on the easel. I set the aperture to f:11 to minimize falloff caused by a large aperture. I then removed the negative, leaving white light falling on the easel.

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    Then I measured the light intensity with my analyzer. I use a Speedmaster A10 with a 3mm fiber optic probe. With the probe at the center of the image area, I set the analyzer to give a full-scale needle deflection. That equates to an exposure indication of 8 seconds. Next, I checked the light intensity at the corners. Tilting the probe toward the lens, a standard procedure to eliminate "cosine error," the needle indicated a 12-second exposure, or 50% more light needed. At the center of the bottom edge (within the image range of a 6x6 neg), things were just a bit better; there, the analyzer indicated 11 seconds.

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    A half-stop falloff is not perfect, but for me, it's workable. At worst, I will have to burn in a corner or two on some prints.

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    Your enlarger is different from mine, so it may exhibit either more or less falloff in the corners. Mine is a condenser type, and I very likely could have reduced my falloff a bit by putting a diffusion matte in the filter drawer.

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    Still, unless you can get the 80mm at a super low price, you may want to consider the Componon-S 100mm/5.6 lens. New from B&H, it costs another $75, it's one stop dimmer, and it will not project as large an image on the easel as will the 80mm, but it will be a perfect match for your 6x7 negatives. If I didn't already have my 80mm, I would go for the 100mm.

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    Mel
     
  3. Although not a schneider, I just recently purchased an 80mm El nikkor.
    Prior to the purchase, I e-mailed Nikon and they do not make an 90mm lenses, because their 80mm will cover the 6x7 fromat.

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    The 80mm is a 6 element design and in my experience, it covers the 6x7 format well. As to light fall off I found only about 25% drop from center to edge at 22x28 height(Omega c760xl). I always burn the edges of all my prints at least 10% as a matter of routine.
     
  4. Hi,
    I have such a Schneider Componon but that lens is not good enough to
    make very big pictures. (127*100cm) One have to stop down 2.5 f-stops
    to get good sharpness in the corners. Now I use Rodenstock APO 80mm/4 N and that lens is quite sharp also at full opening. However I stop
    down 0.5 f-stops to be sure. I think it's the best lens but rather expensive.(I use it to 6*7 color negatives)
     
  5. FWIW, I print all my 6x7 negatives with a 75mm Ektar, even though I have a 105 Nikkor available to me. I prefer the closer focusing distance, and have had no problems with fall-off that normal edge-burning will not take care of.
     
  6. Dave J.

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    I tried using a 75mm El Nikkor, but the edges fell apart on the 6x7 negative(four element lens). Bought a 90mm Beslar used from B&H and it was NG. So sprung for new 80mm El Nikkor and got a jewel. Sold the 75mm to a blad buddy who thinks its ok for 6x6 (which it was).

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    Sucia; Unless you are on a tight budget or you KNOW that you won't be making anything larger than an 8x10, DON'T spend $$$ on a good MF camera and then skimp on the enlarging lens. Been there, done that!

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    Gene
     
  7. I've been reading the posts on the Schneider lens with interests as
    I was planning on buying this same one used this week. Now I'm not so sure.
    I have a Beslar Printmaker 35 and recently purchased a RB67, so
    I know I need to get a conversion kit for my enlarger but I am
    really stumped as to what to get for a lens.
    I don't want to spend an awful lot right now, but obviously
    want something decent and certainly want to be able to print bigger
    than 11 x 14 in the future. I'm really getting overwhelmed with all the choices and would appreciate any advice. Thank you Eileen
     
  8. My experience with the 80mm El Nikkor is good. B&H will sell you a gray market new one for less than $200. Since the 80mm is a fairly recent addition to Nikon's line, a used 80mm would probably work well, but the asking price may no be much less than a new one(indication of demand).

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    Used enlarging lenses usually are not abused much, but fungus can be a problem. Get a trial period and make as big a full frame print as you can,(from a grainey negative such as tri x) stopped down at least 2 stops, and look at the corners with a loupe to determine how well defined the grain is compared to the center. Even a cheap lens can be sharp in the center, but the corners are the real story. Be sure to check all four corners, as unsharpness in part of the corners, but not all, indicates that your negative may be buckled or you have an alignment problem. Be sure that all four corners are equally sharp or unsharp, before keeping or sending the lens back. Don't expect the corners to be quite as sharp as the center except in the very expensive process lenses. You have to ultimately decide what is acceptable to you.

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    My experience is that in enlarging lens, you get what you pay for!

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    Nikon only makes one line of enlarging lenses and all apparently are of good to excellent quality. My 50 is great and the 75 I sold was great for 6x6 coverage.

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    Others let us know what the story is on other lens makers.
     

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