Ricoh/Pentax MIA

Discussion in 'Pentax' started by htarragon, Oct 24, 2013.

  1. I went to my first PhotoExpo in NYC today (I knw, what took me so long). I had questions for Canon re: my printer and the red color cast, Vivitar as to whether they are still making the 2x 7 blade TC. and Tamron as to whether they will be making any more PK mount lenses. I get to call Canon tomorrow for a walk-through of my problem; Vivitar guy defiantly tells me there's "no demand" for Pentax, saying he supplies B&H and Adorama (both of whom have it listed on their websites as backordered. I ordered one from B&H when there was no backorder posted but now there is. I'll have to cancel my order tomorrow. Tamron practically sneered at me when I asked my question.
    But what could I say? Ricoh/Pentax was nowhere in sight nor listed on the directory. I have a K-5. I could use a 2.8 70-200 lens for portraits. Do I invest in a Sigma? This is just very discouraging. I've been happy with my camera and lenses wide angle (Tamron and Pentax kit 18-55), DA 50-200 and DA 50-300 (2-one broken (dropped)) a Tamron 90mm 1:1 macro and a Rokinon 85mm 1.4 manual focus. I do landscape, flowers/plants, candid and posed portraits. Do I get the 55mm 1.4 for posed portraits? a 50-135 or a 17-70 the latter two are fastish lenses and all are SDM which have had problems. This is a very unhappy situation.
     
  2. Sounds like Four Thirds. Nothing new to be found.
    Everyone has gone to micro4/3. Ugh!
     
  3. Howard, if you are talking about PhotoPlus Expo, Pentax actually had a presence--sharing a table at the Unique Photo booth. The other Pentax site has a story. You can even check out a K-3. But really, they should have had a more visible, Pentax-Ricoh branded presence. I really want to believe those third-rate marketing days are over. . .
    Secondly, I'd recommend the 50-135mm DA*. I've owned two of them and now the Tokina EOS version and think it is wonderful. The SDM issues appear to be repaired, plus I never had problems. I'm not a big proponent of the 70-200mm focal range for cropped sensor cameras--that's a valuable range for FF and maybe some sports in the cropped world, but it seems too cramped for portraits.
    ME
     
  4. Ricoh seems to have a stronger presence outside the U.S. The GRD models in particular have a well deserved cult following. But that's outside the scope of the U.S. distributor.
    I wouldn't put too much emphasis on a company's presence or lack thereof at meatspace conventions. Opinions and trends seem to shift about the value of those types of gatherings.
     
  5. Sadly, this is the problem with Pentax. They lost market and with it third-party support. Yet they think they can continue on the same road and yet find greener pastures.
    Sounds like Four Thirds. Nothing new to be found.
    Everyone has gone to micro4/3. Ugh!​
    That's not "ugh", that's "finally" - like when Pentax was the last manufacturer of note to finally adopt a bayonet mount in their DSLRs. If they would but just search their history to understand how their failure to keep up with technology brought them where they are now!
     
  6. Michael - I went past the Unique booth several times and never saw them -and to not be listed? I just looked at the reviews for the 50-135 and they're great when the SDM worked. How does one know if one is getting an "issue fixed" lens? and why have you had several of the lenses?
     
  7. Pentax never made a DSLR without a bayonet mount. It switched from the M42 screw mount to the bayonet 'K' mount for its film SLRs in 1975 with the introduction of the KM, KX and K2 models.
     
  8. I went past the Unique booth several times and never saw them -and to not be listed?​
    You were most likely a few steps ahead of them, no news there. Photos on the other site clearly show the flag. My guess is that the event booking timeframe was during a period of indecision by Ricoh about the release of the K-3 (and probably other products) as well as their marketing strategy. With the K-3 about to hit the street, they probably figured any presence, let alone an unlisted one, was worthwhile. I know, pure kitchen table monkey business, but it is better to be seen when you have a new product coming out.
    How does one know if one is getting an "issue fixed" lens? and why have you had several of the lenses?​
    I thought the newer dates of manufacture were less problematic. Hey there is risk to all purchases, but if the lens helps get you great shots. . .Suppose you could buy new and get an extended warranty beyond what your credit card provides.
    Both of the ones I owned performed excellently. I don't own them now for unrelated reasons. If the K-3 is the cat's pajamas, then I'll simply get another. I only wish the lens had a tripod mount like the Tokina version does.
    If portraits are your requirement, I'd say get the DA Ltd 70mm and declare victory. Surely one of the greatest Pentax lenses ever. Otherwise your Tamron 90mm and Rokinon 85mm should be superb.
    I'm looking forward to tethering the K-3 to my iPad during portrait and studio-type shoots.
    ME
     
  9. Given that I won't be spending close to $1000+ on a lens or camera for a while, maybe the older inventory will clear out. An extended warranty is a good idea.
     
  10. Pentax never made a DSLR without a bayonet mount. It switched from the M42 screw mount to the bayonet 'K' mount for its film SLRs in 1975 with the introduction of the KM, KX and K2 models.​
    Yes, I meant SLRs, not DSLRs - I got so used to typing DSLRs that I did it here too. And I also meant to say "finally have switched away from a screw mount" instead of "finally adopt a bayonet mount", but I spurted that out and didn't proof read it. So my corrected statement is:
    "Pentax was the last manufacturer of note to finally have switched away from a screw mount in their SLRs."
     
  11. You have some very nice equipment.
    Traditionally with film (35mm) or full frame digital, portrait photographers have favored focal lengths of 70 to not much over 100mm or so. The 85mm f/1.4 has been very popular. But that is getting a bit long for APS-C digital cameras, with the crop factor boosting the effective FL to near 130mm. Using longer than optimum FL ranges for portraits can flatten features somewhat. A FL that is too short at a closer shooting distance can have the opposite effect- exaggerated features. Fastish lenses are favored because depth of field can be reduced to blur the background more.
    A 70-200mm is a honking big, heavy beast of a lens. For posed portraits, the shorter part of its range would be most often used, making most of its size and weight more like liability than usability. For candids, such a big rig might often call attention to itself and be a distraction for the purpose of candids. The DA* 50-135mm is a great tele zoom lens, but not very highly rated for sharp performance at closer focus distance. (but how close used is the question) And it is still rather big for candid use.
    The DA* 55mm f/1.4 was formulated with posed portraits in mind, but it is a little short to get enough distance away from subjects to sneak candid shots while they remain unaware. The FA 77mm f/1.8 is one of the best for your stated purposes. It is compact for its FL and speed, and is unobtrusive with a little more shooting distance for candids than the DA 70mm Limited, which is also a bit slower at f/2.4 and tested a little shorter than specified, more like 65mm. The 77mm Limited is actually 77mm. It is a great lens, capable of beautiful images with wonderful bokeh.
    If f/4 is good enough to blur background to your satisfaction, and you are ok with a lens the size of the 17-70mm, you may as well just work with your DA 55-300mm which is compact for a zoom, not really larger than the 17-70mm, and its aperture can remain around f/4-4.5 all the way out to 200mm.
     
  12. Anthony, there's nothing wrong with m43. The new E-M1 resolves the size issue for those with larger hands and in pretty well all 'real world' shooting provides IQ as good as the better APS-C DSLRs. Only battery life seems to be an issue for me.
     
  13. I've been going to Photo Expo for years. Sometimes Pentax is there with a real set up, sometimes nothing more than a few Costco folding tables, other times not at all. It won't be much longer before they're sharing a booth with Kodak ;-)
     
  14. American photo shows are pretty much a big nothing compared to European and Asian shows. Pentax has a far bigger presence at WPPI held in Las Vegas every spring. Although New Yorkers may think otherwise, the PhotoExpo in NYC is a small, relatively inconsequential show in the overall global scheme of things.
     
  15. PhotoExpo in NYC is a small, relatively inconsequential show in the overall global scheme of things.​
    Yes, because as every knows, wedding photography is at the true center and pinnacle in the world of professional photography.
     
  16. Well, wedding photography is certainly not my thing either. I would never touch a camera again if I could only do weddings. But when I want to see and experience the latest photographic hardware, I go to shows that exhibit the most of it. In the US those are WPPI and the Winter Consumer Electronics Show. Both are in Las Vegas. I will admit I'm luckier than most as attending those shows only requires a 120 mile drive.
     
  17. The absence from some of the exhibits don't concern me as much as the lack of support in third party lens. It is a growing concern in my view when I see Tamron stop some of the newer lens in Pentax mount. One typical sample is the recent Tamron SP 60mm f/2.8 macro and I can't find the equivalent in Pentax mount. And if 3rd party have a new lens out , Pentax always seem to be the last one out if anything. Compared that to Pentax in 5 years ago, there are enough bad reputation on dwindling support that is very negative to its loyal user base if you ask me. Gone are the days that I can welcome the arrival of newer lens in Tokina, Tamron and Sigma. We are still fortunate that Sigma still have some newer lenses with Pentax mount.
     
  18. The absence from some of the exhibits don't concern me as much as the lack of support in third party lens.​
    Indeed, this is a serious issue. I think the decline of the Pentax brand and associated sales over the past few years has increased the risk of marketing a K-mount for third parties.
    Hopefully Ricoh is fixing this with reborn sales channels, better point-of-sale displays and advertising (advertising, imagine that!), and of course great products. If the K-3 is a hit--even with the Pentax faithful--then we'll see more lenses from the third parties. The gaps in focal length coverage are quite obvious but it's in Ricoh's hands as much as anyone. I think Sigma's chances of releasing a K-mount version of the 120-300mm f2.8 increases if Pentax offers a DA 100-400 f 4-5.6. Especially if the K-3 can use it well. It's gonna take a year or two though to convince the corporate bean counters.
    ME
     
  19. This is troubling notice on the Sigma 24-105mm f/4.0 art series
    http://www.sigmaphoto.com/product/24-105mm-f4-dg-os-hsm-art
    Official announcement.

    will be available for Canon, Nikon, Sigma, and Sony mounts (in that order). The lens features optical stabilization (except for Sony) and supports Sigma's USB dock. You'll be able to pick one up for yourself starting next month at a retail price of $899. In the UK, the recommended retail price will be £849.99.


    And I thought the 18-35mm f/1.8 Art series will have Pentax mount. I am not so sure from the Sigma site with mount selection currently provided with Sigma, Nikon and Canon.
    http://www.sigmaphoto.com/product/18-35mm-f18-dc-hsm-art
    It will be extremely sad if Sigma follow Tamron and Zeiss to put Pentax out of the picture with their latest lens release. And the price grouching from the mother-ship of Ricoh/Pentax is adding trauma to the squeeze. And we can only be hopeful that K-3 is a big hit if anything to get better recognition of the brand and 3rd party lens support.
     
  20. And I thought the 18-35mm f/1.8 Art series will have Pentax mount.​
    This lens is specifically for APS-C bodies and will be released in K-mount because that's what Pentax offers.
    The Sigma 24-105mm f/4.0 directly competes with FF-oriented offerings by the major brands. Pentax is out of scope for now. That seems like a no-brainer business call.
    ME
     
  21. Thank you Michael, you assessment makes perfect sense. I do hope that Sigma will deliver the 18-35mm f/1.8 for Pentax in early part of 2014. I may have stronger interest on the zoom than the FA 31 limited. Don't know what I am talking about as 31mm is still pretty compact for its fast speed but it darns on me that the Sigma can go to f/1.8 constant for that critical aps-c range in 18-35. Very tempting to consider to get for K-3: FA 31 vs Sigma 18-35 where the later is more versatile though more bulky and heavy.
    I am bored with the FF rumor but if it leads to anything and if FF Pentax pans out in 2014, I hope that Sigma will re-visit the 24-105 f/4.0 Art series decision.
     
  22. You are welcome Hin. The 18-35mm is intriguing, though it conflicts (mentally for me) with a more general purpose f2.8 zoom in a more useful focal range such as 16-50mm. I'd also just be disappointed in my DA Ltd. 21mm and 35mm macro lenses being usurped.
    A K-mount version of the Tokina 11-16mm f2.8 is of a higher priority to me, second only to a 80-400mm f4-5.6 that could be used on cropped and FF bodies.
    If Pentax releases a FF body next year (and it smells like it) I gotta assume that they will have their own standard 24-90mm-ish lens. There will be plenty of space for Sigma and others to compete.
    ME
     

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