'Rejects' - or images that at first sight ....

Discussion in 'Casual Photo Conversations' started by Tony Parsons, Jul 12, 2019.

  1. Tony Parsons

    Tony Parsons Norfolk and Good

    Looking through the 'Blurry' thread in the NW forum, i wonder how many would have deleted them as unwanted, not realising they may come in handy. That is one reason I never delete images - storage is cheaper than regrets.
     
  2. I delete 90% before I get home, they are that bad.
     
  3. I’m with Sanford on this although i delete mine on the ipad at home. Don’t laugh but i even have a little ritual i perform when deleting photos.
     
  4. Tony Parsons

    Tony Parsons Norfolk and Good

    Wasn't going to laugh - everyone needs their way of manipulating reality. One of mine is cursing inanimate objects that don't do what I want. I mean, what on earth is so attractive about gravity ?
     
    HoofArted likes this.
  5. Ritual? In pace requiescat.

    I rarely delete photos intentionally, even shots of the ground while walking. I could never be comfortable wondering whether something valuable was lost when there's a gap in frame numbers.

    Just as well, too. On numerous occasions I return to images I never published or used, because they fit a need which didn't exist at the time.
     
    Tony Parsons likes this.
  6. Tony Parsons

    Tony Parsons Norfolk and Good

    My point exactly
     
  7. Most of the blurs in that thread seem intentional, either when taking the photo (using movement, depth of field, or shooting through windows and what-not) or the blur was added in post. I get the feeling most would not have been rejects. Overall, they seemed deliberate and not just like they came in handy for a thread.

    My rejects are some of my best work, so I keep ‘em. :)
     
    Tony Parsons likes this.
  8. Tony Parsons

    Tony Parsons Norfolk and Good

    Can't speak for others, of course, but mine was certainly unintentional - I was intending a portrait of the gull, when the rat ran across (the brown lump !). Taken while zooming out, turning to frame the rat, and jumping a little through surprise !
     
  9. I delete everything I don't like, which is most. I see little point in keeping them. They fill up your hard drive, confuse, and bloat any selection process and make it harder to locate images that you really do like. Also a bad picture 99% of the time stays bad. I rarely keep multiple shots of a similar view too. My feeling is the world needs fewer images if anything, not more.
     
  10. My own view is, if you have faith in your ability, you have an infinite supply of photos (barring accidents) so why worry about an off day. Tomorrow is another day.
     
    Brad_, HoofArted and Tony Parsons like this.
  11. As an anal-retentive archaeologist, I pretty much save everything.

    In so many cases, methods of post-processing or simply taste have changed, and I find I'm glad I saved the '2nds'
     
  12. It would be tough to be the official Whitehouse photographer. Every photo, good or bad, becomes part of the public record, not your property to be deleted once the button is pushed. My doctor tells me: walk more, sit (Photoshop) less, so I have to keep a 50-50 time balance.
     
    mikemorrell and Supriyo like this.
  13. I wouldn't care, if it's not my responsibility to archive, back up and answer if data is lost (that would be White House ITS whoever that is) :). White House photographers maintain their own curated subsets though which are published later on in books and magazines.
     
  14. Tony Parsons

    Tony Parsons Norfolk and Good

    I use the official House of Commons exercise regime - 'Jump to conclusions, duck responsibility'.
     
  15. It would be tough to be the official Whitehouse photographer. Every photo, good or bad, becomes part of the public record, not your property to be deleted once the button is pushed. My doctor tells me: walk more, sit (Photoshop) less, so I have to keep a 50-50 time balance.

    Well in some ways that would be much easier. You keep everything you take: simple. No thought required. Also that is professional work. If you don't like it then don't take the job: you are not doing it for your own pleasure.
     
  16. You state like a supervisor with no sense of humor (not rare). :)
     
  17. I have no sense of humor: it is my one failing. A professional job is quite different to a hobby. If it was a professional job I would keep the images for at least 7 years.
     
    Ricochetrider, Gary Naka and Supriyo like this.
  18. Film, I keep everything, but only print what I want to, like most people I imagine.

    Digital, I sort in folders by date. Everything is backed up. I delete raws and original jpegs that are more than a month or two old, leaving only the finished 'output' jpegs, but I still have the originals archived should I want to go back to them.

    Anything I think is particularly good, I print.
     
  19. Like @samstevens says, there are photos in which the blur (either by design or by chance) adds interest to a photo. I've taken many, many more 'blurry photos' in which the blur adds absolutely nothing! Except to tell me that my shutter speed was way too low, my focus was on the wrong spot, etc.

    When I transfer photos from my camera/phone to my Laptop, I 'rate' them. I usually have multiple shots of the same scene/subject choose 'the best of the bunch' to keep. Every so often I just cull the rest knowing that I'm never going to look at them again anyway.
     
  20. I delete some in camera. I keep the SD cards as I would have kept film. Then delete what I don't want on the computer files. I can go back to the SD cards if need be.
     
    tholte likes this.

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