Question about ISO rating

Discussion in 'Black and White' started by connor_stride, Feb 1, 2009.

  1. I'm just running a roll of Ilford delta 3200 through the camera.
    I noticed on Ilford's website it is rated at 1000 ISO but It also suggests a recommended meter setting of EI 3200/36.
    Forgive my ignorance, but what does this mean exactly?
    is it recommending I set my external light meter setting to 3200 ISO? and treat it like 3200 iso instead of 1000 iso?
    I'm not sure what the letters EI or /36 mean either. I am a little confused.
     
  2. Exposure Index --> iso rate.
    The nominal EI for the Ilford Delta 3200 is with most developers iso 1000, with some speed enhanced developers like DD-X, Microphen around iso 1250. The rest is a push development which gives a steeper log D curve of the film (>0,65).
    A regular film curve should be 0,55 for printing with a condensor type enlarger and 0,62-0,65 with a diffuser type enlarger.
    With a regular MG (Multi Grade) paper and filter 2-2 1/2 you should have all grey tones from white till black in your print and reach a normal contrast.
    When the curve is too steep you must correct with a 0 or 1 MG filter to have regular prints, the same when the film has no contrast but then with MG filter 4-5. In both circumstances you will loose a part of information which is not in the negative anymore. Even the best split grade system can not archive a perfect print from a bad developed film.
     
  3. Thanks robert,
    I intend to develop this with hc-110 and will be scanning the negatives.
    Would I be best to shoot at 1000 iso?
     
  4. The film is designed to pe pushed so I for the most time rate it at 3200 because that is the reason I got the film but it looks nice at 1600 but I can't tell much differance in shadow detail between 1600 and 3200 because I use it in places that tend not to have much in the shadows. Clubs etc.
    HC-110 is my standard developer for that film.
     
  5. Thanks very much Larry,
    If you get a moment, is there any chance you could share with me your recipe for developing it in HC-110?
    dilution, times, agitation and such. I'm a novice at processing films so need all the help I can get :)
    I've 6 shots left on the film and I rated all the others at 3200 so i will continue to do so.
     
  6. Films have one ISO speed. This is determined by the manufacturer. What you end up shooting it at is an EI, Exposure Index and is a personal thing.
    Delta 3200 true ISO is around 1000, some folks say 800. You may shoot it at any speed you wish, but you then have to develop accordingly. You can shoot it as high as 12,000 if you wish, but most folks stop at 3200 or 6400.
    If you do a search, you'll find globs of info about this film and "pushing" it.
     
  7. the other number you saw is a din rating a european film speed from a while back.
     
  8. So far I've only deved one roll of Delta 3200 in HC110, I had mostly used Rodinal in the past.
    I shot it at around EI1600, dilution H at 20C for 16 minutes, agitation for 30 seconds, then 3 agitations every 30 seconds after that.
    I use Covington's page on HC110 to supplement the massive dev chart: http://www.covingtoninnovations.com/hc110/
     
  9. Thanks Robert Yes I use 14.5 minutes dilution B for this film at 3200 and to top that off using HC-110 I just mix 15 ML of the syrup to 500ml of water and it is a great 1 shot. for most other films I use Dilution H double B and just double the time.
     
  10. Thanks lads, I just had a success with Dilution A - 8 mins (I'd already started before I read the post about Dil B) I'll post the results when I get them scanned.
    Thanks for all your help.
     
  11. I think you will find Dilution Sharper. Grain may very depending on divers usage. : )
     
  12. Now I am confussed. If the "true" speed is 1000, why do Ilford sell it as 3200? As that is the best part of 2 stops difference, if the "true" speed is 1000 they may as well sell it as a 200 film then?
     
  13. It is a film that is designed to be pushed and with Development with the proper developer. Development ment to hold shadow. It is a fine film The Kodak T-Max is just the same I find little difference between them other than tones. Maybe the Ilford has more grain but who cares if you get an Avabile shot ....
     
  14. Yes, it's designed to be pushed, however, many a camera owner has set his meter to 3200 and shot away only to get thin negs. IIRC, Ilford states the true ISO on the box. I'm not sure whether Kodak does or not, but Kodak calls their film P3200; P is for push.
     
  15. Armatures... those Kodak folks ... if they don't no it is on the box. And aloso in one of the most infornitave pages on the internet you just have to find it in the Kodak Mess.
     
  16. I have both Tmax 3200 and Delta 3200 in the house right now. I've examined both boxes for 20 minutes now.
    The Delta says nothing about ISO and right on the box says EI3200.
    The Tmax says nothing about ISO nor EI.
    That being said I prefer Tmax 3200 and wish it was sold in 120. I also love Neopan 1600 but, alas, it's not sold in 120, either.
     
  17. it is tain't now but I have a roll in the freezer.
     
  18. "I noticed on Ilford's website it is rated at 1000 ISO but It also suggests a recommended meter setting of EI 3200/36.
    Forgive my ignorance, but what does this mean exactly?
    is it recommending I set my external light meter setting to 3200 ISO? and treat it like 3200 iso instead of 1000 iso?"
    It means that it's really an ISO 1000 film. And I would suggest you shoot at ISO 1000 if you're concerned about shadow detail. Shooting at 3200 means the film is being pushed and therefore you'll lose shadow detail.
     

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