Professional modern film cameras

Discussion in 'Modern Film Cameras' started by andy_collins|1, Jan 27, 2011.

  1. I frequently use my Canon EOS 1vHS, a top-tier camera, one of the absolute best ever, capable of handling any situation a photographer can possibly find him or herself in. I know of other cameras that are equals of the 1v, namely the Nikon F6 and F5, while others are definitely pro-caliber cameras but maybe not quite as full-featured as these behemoths, like the F100. What are some other modern film cameras that would fit in the same category as the 1v or F6, or even the F100 and EOS 3? We discussed the Maxxum 7 and 9 in another thread, but what about cameras from Pentax or even some other Minoltas? What features or capabilities do you think warrant their inclusion in this category? I ask this because I'm always fascinated by a manufacturer's interpretation of what meets a pro's needs.
     
  2. I note merely that the EOS 1v is not the only Canon EOS camera to qualify as "professional" by even a narrow definition. Historically, there are cameras that may not be so capable as the 1v that still deserve consideration in the first rank. Certainly the original EOS 1 and the later EOS1n qualify. I'd suggest that the EOS 3 at the very least should also be in this league. There are other EOS cameras, earlier, that at the least deserve consideration alongside the Maxxums and Nikons.
     
  3. I absolutely agree JDM, although I did briefly mention the EOS 3 in passing. The A2 would also probably qualify; George Lepp used to use one during the 90s, if I recall correctly. I certainly don't mean to imply that the 1v is the only pro-caliber EOS; it's just one member in a long chain. To be honest I was really thinking about other manufacturers' cameras since I'm pretty familiar with Canon, but I didn't communicate that very well at all.
     
  4. Pentax MZ-S? And are you only talking about 35mm? Because there are some AF medium format cameras that are definitely "professional".
     
  5. Just about all of the Hasselblad line, the Mamiya RZ and RB, ... All great, modern professional cameras.
     
  6. SCL

    SCL

    Don't forget the Leica R8&9, even though they didn't have auto focus I believe they were the only 35mmfilm camera bodies which had an interchangeable digital back .
     
  7. I was originally referring to 35mm cameras, but let's include other formats as well.
     
  8. K B Canham cameras are excellent. New lightweight materials with a classic design.
     
  9. It's always a sticky wicket this "pro" camera thing. Most top-of-the-line cameras were used by pros and /or preferred by pros but many lessor cameras were also be used professionally. Once you open up the format category, a virtual flood of medium and large format cameras would fit the bill. Indeed it is fascinating that if it takes interchangeable lenses, some pro, somewhere could press it into service for a money making enterprise.
     
  10. Sorry, you surely did mention the 3, I guess my knee-jerque reaction clicked in too soon after
    a top-tier camera, one of the absolute best ever, capable of handling any situation a photographer can possibly find him or herself in​
    Given that you are seeking non Canon/Nikon classics, which I agree is a good question, I am nonetheless curious how you would categorize the EOS 620 which Canon called 'professional' at the time. I'm not arguing one way or the other on it myself since I've always been ambivalent about it.
     
  11. Yeah Louis, there are undoubtedly many pros who had to shoot parts of weddings with their Rebel backup cameras. I agree, the 'pro' designation isn't worth much.
    I think Andy is asking which are the Latest and Greatest, Top o' the Line bodies from the other makers? I can only think of three; the 1V, F6, and the Maxxum 9. The secondary premium cameras would then be the EOS 3, F100, and the Maxxum 7. I plead ignorance of Pentax and Olympus, and the Contax lineup just confooses me.
     
  12. I shot professionally with my Nikon FE2 and FM2n bodies, but they were never marketed as pro cameras. Sure were tough though and they never let me down once.
    I enjoy the Nikon F100 very much, it sits alongside my Nikon F3HP which I also enjoy very much. It's my second F100 and my second F3HP. Won't sell them off this time, regretted it the first time. They are too good and the price I paid for each ($150 and $225 respectively) was very reasonable.
    Other formats I'd say the Pentax 67 was a wonderful large SLR camera. I always wanted one, the Pentax optics were very highly regarded and they seemed to make a lot of different focal lengths. It's the one MF camera I never owned, having shot with Mamiya, Bronica and Hasselblad in the past. Maybe I'll pick one up someday...maybe not! If I were to buy a 6x7 camera it would be a Mamiya 7 for sure...
     
  13. I don't think a camera is a pro camera just because some professional photographer at some time in some place used it to make money. I wouldn't call a Holga a pro camera, even though some wedding photographers occasionally use them to give their photos a different look.
    I think the designation of a camera as "professional" refers to the build quality and robustness of the camera. The are made to stand up to heavy use and are built to take more abuse than the cheaper consumer models.
     
  14. JDM--I don't know how I'd classify the EOS 620; I don't have any experience with that camera at all but if Canon marketed it as a pro camera, I'd consider it to be one. In fact I meant to ask you earlier whether or not the 650 was considered to be a pro camera when it first came out. I know very little about any EOS prior to the 10S even though I had a 650 for a short while recently.
     
  15. I'll give a shout out for the Minolta 9000. It's a solid camera, very heavy, very strong with quite a big system around it. Being a 9-series camera it was the upper end of the Minolta range in its time, the mid- to late-80s.
    This camera/drive/grip/flash combo uses a total of 24 AA and 4 AAA batteries ...
    [​IMG]
     
  16. Andy,
    Canon themselves clearly indicated that the 620 was an advanced version of the 650 with additional features worthy of "serious photography". Contemporary reviews indicated the "advanced amateur" character of the 650, but occasionally some little tot in the front row popped up with the observation that there wasn't so much difference between the 650 and the 620 aside from the price. Most reviewers bought the Canon-implied "professional" status for the 620.
    I have shot with both of them (link and link) and they are both nice. The 620 has higher speeds, and some other handy things, but in ordinary use, not so different. In retrospect, many professionals used the 620 and 650, but when the first Canon 1 came out, that one was the real key to Canon taking the lead among professionals.
     
  17. "I wonder if any one is using a Fujifilm GF670 yet ?"
    Yes. I posted the following in another thread concerning Medium Format enlargeability.
    "I have the a Mamiya 7II, a Fuji GF670 and an older Fuji GW670III. I also have good quality 100x and 60x microscopes and a Nikon 9000 scanner.

    1 Resolution:
    Best is the Mamiya 7II with both the 50 and 80mm lenses. It out resolves the ability of the Nikon 9000 to capture detail.
    Next is the GF670. It resolves about the same as the Nikon 9000.
    Worst is the GW670III which cannot resolve the detail that can be scanned by the Nikon 9000.

    2. Results most pleasing to my eye without consideration to resolution.
    Best is the Mamiya 7II.
    Next is the GW670III.
    Followed by the GF670, but all are quite acceptable. Notice that I said "My eye." You may like them in another order.

    I have not seen a Flickr medium format scan above 2000PPI (there may be some, I have just not seen any). That is about 38-39 LP/mm on film. So, if you can see a negative difference in resolution on Flickr, the lens or focus was pretty poor.

    To get all of the sharpness from any of the three cameras you need a high resolution film, great focusing and a TRIPOD or you are wasting you money getting a good sharp lensed camera."
     
  18. Medium format, still manufactured:
    Horseman SW 612 Professional. You can attach 6x12, 6x9 and 6x7 backs to it, and use Rodenstock lenses ranging from 35mm to 135mm.
    Arca Swiss, Silvestri, Gottschalt, Ebony, Linhof, Mamiya 7, Mamiya Pro RZ (or RB?)
    Medium format, out of production but pretty 'new':
    Plaubel Makina, Plaubel 69W ProShift Superwide, Fuji GSW 690 III, Fuji GW 690 III, Arca Swiss, Hasselblad, Rollei TLR GX 2.8
    All of them professional cameras, built to last.
     
  19. Medium format, still manufactured:
    Horseman SW 612 Professional. You can attach 6x12, 6x9 and 6x7 backs to it, and use Rodenstock lenses ranging from 35mm to 135mm.
    Arca Swiss, Silvestri, Gottschalt, Ebony, Linhof, Mamiya 7, Mamiya Pro RZ (or RB?)
    Medium format, out of production but pretty 'new':
    Plaubel Makina, Plaubel 69W ProShift Superwide, Fuji GSW 690 III, Fuji GW 690 III, Arca Swiss, Hasselblad, Rollei TLR GX 2.8
    All of them professional cameras, built to last.
     
  20. ...and don't forget Alpa
     

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