Processing Time

Discussion in 'Black and White' started by joanne_de_boehmler|2, Oct 27, 2000.

  1. I have shot a roll of Tri-X 400 at 200 and used a red (25) filter on
    my lens. Can someone advise me what my timing should be for processing this film?
     
  2. Using the red #25 filter drops your film speed by two stops. By
    rating your film of 400 at 200 you have already compensated by 1
    stop. You can compensate the other stop in the development by
    overdeveloping. Your developing time will depend a lot on what
    developer you intend to use. Also take into consideration under what
    conditions you exposed your film at (cloudy, hazy, flat lighting) you
    may want to overdevelop just a bit to bring out some contrast in the
    low-lights. You did not mention what your reasoning was for using a
    red #25 filter to begin with. What are you looking for in your end
    result in your image?

    <p>

    Rhonda
     
  3. Thanks for your answer - I am new at this so still unsure about a lot
    of things. I tried looking for answers but could only find times for
    "pushing" to higher speeds. I plan on using Kodak D-76 developer for
    the processing. A chart I have here recommends 8 minutes for Tri-X
    400. First I looked for processing times for 200 speed but could only
    find a note on Agfa Pan 200 at 10 minutes - so I ended up more
    confused than ever as whether I should process for less or more time!
    I used a red filter just to play - have not experimented with filters
    yet and went into a store and asked what should I start with and the
    red was recommended. It was a bright day and most of the shots are
    outside street scenes. So - trying to put this altogether - do you
    recommend I process for the 8 minutes? I hope you get this tonight as
    I want to work on this in the morning! Thanks again for your input.
     
  4. How did you meter?

    <p>

    If you used the camera's meter, just process it normally. If you used
    a handheld meter, you need to push it one stop.
     
  5. Uhhh, wait a minute. If Joanne used a through the lens meter, with
    the red filter on the lens , and exposed at 200, she OVER EXPOSED
     
  6. Uhhh, wait a minute. If Joanne used a through the lens meter, with
    the red filter on the lens , and exposed at 200, she OVER EXPOSED by
    one stop, and should REDUCE developemtn arrocrdingly.

    <p>

    chris
     
  7. sorry - gremlins!!!!!!!

    <p>

    chris
     
  8. Thanks to all who responded to my query. I ended up doing the
    following and am pleased with the results.

    <p>

    I used Xtol made according to the package directions to make 1 litre
    and processed two rolls for about 6 to 6.5 minutes (I am not 100% sure
    of the time as I forget to start the timer and spent some time
    fiddling around with it after I poured in the chemicals) - I was
    aiming for 5.5 minutes. The second two rolls i processed for 8
    minutes with the Xtol diluted 1:1. All four rolls have good contrast.
    Thanks again for your input.
     
  9. Christian,

    <p>

    Many people shoot TriX at 200 or 250 with normal development. Better
    shadow detail.
     
  10. I get great results with Xtol but the manufacturer's recommend times
    (Kodak and any other company) are intended
    to be a starting point only. You have to adjust development time
    to get the results you desire, using your equipment
    and techniques.
     
  11. Hi Terry, I was not taking issue with what you said. I could have
    sworn there was a post on here that said, by doing what Joanne did,
    she had underexposed the film, and needed to push process.

    <p>

    Regards - chris
     
  12. Chris, I think that the push process was mentioned when it was thought
    that I might have used a hand held meter rather than my camera meter,
    which is what I did (use the meter in my camera). someone from Kodak
    sent me this response when I originally sent my query to them asking
    how long if I used D76:
    "Although you increased your exposure by a stop, you may still be
    underexposed due to the filter. Unless your camera meters through the
    lens, we suggest you add about three minutes to your development time.
    As we do not know your exact lighting conditions/light exposure, this
    is a starting point only. Please refer to the following URL for the
    technical data sheets:
    http://www.kodak.com/cluster/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/f
    9/f9.shtml
     
  13. Hi Joanne - thanks. Well, I am glad your film came out fine!

    <p>

    cheers - chris
     

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