processing kodachrome in bw??

Discussion in 'Black and White' started by david chau, Sep 13, 2005.

  1. hello, i have a roll of kodachrome k-14 200 i have heard it can be
    processed into black and white? if this can be done, can i use id-11
    and what time times would i need

    also what would happen if i e-6 process kodachrome? will i get bw
    transparencies?
     
  2. Yeah, you can process K-14 Kodachrome in D-76/ID-11. You'll get rather low contrast, D-19 might offer better results. You will also get a strong orange mask. There will also be the rem-jet backing you will need to rub off.

    But why? You can still get it processed in color through various merchants, who will send it to one of the remaining three K-14 labs.

    If you process it yourself in E-6, you will get a clear strip of film. There are no dyes in the film, so the color developer in E-6 won't create any color, and then the bleach will remove all the silver. Kodachrome film is "just" three layers of B&W emulsion, with different sensitizations, and different color couplers, but no dyes.

    However, you will also have to remove the black rem-jet backing, which may or may not come off on it's own in the E-6 process. Until you do that, you will have a jet black strip of film.

    If you have it commercially processed in E-6, you'll probably ruin all the other film in the process, because the rem-jet backing will (through Murphy's Law) come off and contaminate it. You will certainly earn the unending emnity of the operator of the E-6 line!
     
  3. whats the dev time needed?

    the thing is i live in australia, its hard to get processing done, also i want to experiment
     
  4. If you process it yourself in E-6, you will get a clear strip of film. There are no dyes in the
    "film, so the color developer in E-6 won't create any color, and then the bleach will remove all
    the silver. Kodachrome film is "just" three layers of B&W emulsion, with different
    sensitizations, and different color couplers, but no dyes."

    John, there are NO dyes in an unprocessed kodachrome film. No COLOUR COUPLERS either.
    The CC's are contained in the colour developers. RED reversal exposure and development
    in colour dev containing CYAN forming CC, BLUE reversal exposure and development in
    colour dev containing YELLOW forming CC and finally MAGENTA fogging development!
     
  5. David, I'd suggest giving it the same time you'd give Tri-X -- if you were doing a lot of Kodachrome this way, you could surely then adjust processing to get the right contrast and film speed. Also, you'd probably gain by increasing dilution and dev time, to ensure the developer penetrates to evenly develop all three layers (otherwise you could affect the color response of the film). And after processing, you'll almost certainly need to remove some or all of the remjet backing -- a lampblack based coating on the base side of the film, it comes off easy with gentle rubbing after soaking in an alkaline bath (baking soda or washing soda dissolved in water will work, the pH isn't at all critical, but be careful not to scratch the wet emulsion while handling the film).

    My one experience with old K-12 Kodachrome showed no yellow/orange filter layer, but there is such a layer in the film as manufactured (to keep the red sensitive layer from also responding to blue light); I suspect that solvent action in the developer or the mild bleaching of rapid fixer removed it (colloidal silver is *a lot* smaller grained than image silver and will bleach very rapidly even in weakly bleaching solutions like ammonium thiosulfate).
     

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