Processing Ilford XP2 with T-Max developer

Discussion in 'Black and White' started by mike_rapier, Jan 31, 1999.

  1. For some time now, I have been processing XP2 with black and white chemicals, and it works fine for the most part.(They come out a little thin) I want to know if anyone has been doing the same, and any ideas on making my negatives a little more dense.I have been using the standard T-Max 1:4 @ 75 degrees, followed by the usual process, stop-fix-wash-etc.
    Anyone out there doing the same?
     
  2. I'm glad to hear I'm not the only one who has tried this. I used to develop XP-1 in D-76 with excellent results. If
    your negatives come out too thin either increase the amount of chemistry in the mix or increase your development
    time. As I remember we had to develop XP-1 about 25 percent longer than recommended for T-Max 400. I still
    have the negatives and some prints from this combination.
     
  3. ok,
    this has me intrigued.

    <p>

    If a XP[1|2] in (name your silver emulsion developer) works, then what
    would I get if I tried to develop normal colour negs (or slides, for
    that matter) in D76 (or other)?

    <p>

    Anyone tried this? I seem to remember a chart detailing the results
    of all possible cross-processing (C41, E6, silver), but can't find it.

    <p>

    duncan
     
  4. Aha! I finally found it (should've looked harder in the first place)
    quoted from
    ph
    oto.net QA forum





    (from Langford's Advanced Photography):




    Film Process Result




    BW E6 or C41 Clear film




    E6 C41 Contrasty, unmasked color neg
    BW neg Pale BW negative




    K-chrome E6 Clear film
    BW neg BW neg with backing dye
    still present




    C41 E6 Low contrast, cyan cast slide
    BW Ghost thin BW neg with mask color
     
  5. I posted this late last year...you may find it interesting...Jim

    <p>

    XP2 Super In XTOL!
    asked in the B&W Photo - Film & Processing Q&A Forum
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

    One of the people I share my darkroom with mistakenly developed a
    roll of the new XP2 Super in XTOL 1:2 for 7.75 minutes at 78 degrees.
    The XP2 was shot outside at EI 250 on a moderately bright but
    overcast day. So here is the kicker...although my friend had to leave
    before we could make a print, the negs looked printable, as a matter
    of fact they look very printable! The processing included stopping
    the negs for 30 seconds in Kodak Indicator Stop Bath. Then fixing in
    Kodak Hardening Fixer mixed for film (I will get the ratio for anyone
    who wants it) for 10 minutes. We then washed the negs for 10 minutes.
    It was at this point that we opened the Patterson jug and found the
    XP2 Super mixed in with 3 rolls of TriX. We washed for 20 minutes
    then hung the film to dry but noticed chemical stain forming on the
    XP2. We restopped the negs for 2 minutes and refixed for 15 more
    minutes, then Hypo Clear for 5 minutes (all at constant agitation).
    Then a 30 minute wash. The chemical stains seemed to have disappeared
    after the reprocessing. Has anyone ever tried developing XP2 or Super
    XP2 in conventional B+W chemistry? Is anyone interested in hearing
    how the prints turn out? I shoot about 250 rolls of XP2 a year. I've
    just started to use the Super. Does anyone want to comment on the new
    XP 2 Super. This is my first time in a "User Group" so please
    overlook any Faux Pax on my part. Jim

    <p>

    -- Jim Vanson (primary_colors@hotmail.com), August 08, 1998
    Answers
    XP2 Super v. non-Super
    I'm interested in how the Super compares to 'old' XP2. I used to use
    XP2, but became more interested in conventional films. What is your
    first impression of Super?
    Dana

    <p>

    -- Dana H. Myers K6JQ (Dana@Source.Net), August 09, 1998.

    <p>


    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

    <p>

    About 12 years ago, because I didn't know any better, I regularly
    processed XP-1 in D-76. I still have some of the negatives, and have
    a print in my living room from one. It is beautiful. Don't know why
    it works, and I have no idea about archival properties developing
    film this way, but I have some very nice negatives.

    <p>

    -- Darron Spohn (sspohn@concentric.net), August 12, 1998.

    <p>

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------
    Contribute an answer to "XP2 Super In XTOL!"
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

    bwworld@hotmail.com
     
  6. As I understand it, when you expose XP2 the image is recorded in a
    silver halide image as conventional films, However in development the
    image is transfered to the dye which forms the final image and then
    the silver is bleached away in the Bleach-Fix. I guess that using
    standard B&W processing would leave you with the image held in the
    grains of silver as this wont be bleached out - I would expect the
    image to be grainier than normal.
     
  7. "using standard B&W processing would leave you with the image held in the grains of silver as this wont be bleached out - I would expect the image to be grainier than normal."
    Another blast from the past... (I picked up a slew of 120 XP2 for .50/roll, and was searching for info on traditional processing of the stuff -- I prefer to have silver images for archival purposes)
    One feature of chromogenic films is that the dye couplers remain in the film after traditional B&W processing, so if you're not happy with the results, you can bleach the negatives (use either a color processing bleach -- not a bleach-fix!), then re-expose to light, and then finish up by giving them standard C41 processing. (You can rescue color negative film that's been given B&W processing by accident using that tactic, although these days the opposite is happening more frequently thanks to the rocket scientists behind the processing counters, and there is no salvation for a clear as glass strip of film that's had everything stripped out of it in the bleach-fix.)
     

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