Portraits (1)

Discussion in 'Seeking Critique' started by jc1305us, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:01 PM.

  1. Couple of portraits (I usually shoot city/architecture) thoughts? Both shot on a Rolleiflex 2.8f using Tri-X. Thanks in advance
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    Ricochetrider likes this.
  2. I really do like these 2 very different portraits a lot. I only ever shoot digital and I had no idea what a Rolleiflex 2.8f was or why it would be worth mentioning. But the quality of your first portrait prompted me to find out more and it seems like a really cool camera!

    On your first portrait, your use of natural (?) light is superb! I love the subtle and delicate grey tones in the photo as a whole. These - together with the film grain - give (for me) your portrait an 'ethereal' quality. In any case, your first portrait exudes atmosphere'. In terms of composition, I really like the way in which the woman's gaze leads \my eye to the left while the depth of the archway to her right (visually) draws my attention to the right. As a viewer, I don't feel any great tension or distraction in this. Just that it's interesting to have two perspectives in one photo.

    The 2nd (most probably 'street') portrait is very different to the 1st one but equally valid. I like the way that you've portrayed the sax player as a subject starkly (focus, greytones, contrast) against a more diffuus background. W.r.t. composition, I like the fact that you've included a 'passer-by' in the background to make 'the story' complete

    Many thanks for sharing these photos. I have no suggestions or tips to offer (even as a sax player :))

    Mike
     
    jc1305us likes this.
  3. The composition of the 1st image feels all wrong to me - the face is essentially centered in the frame leaving too much space above and not sufficient space in front. In addition, the lit column distracts - placing the woman a step or two to the right (provided the light would still have reached her) would have eliminated that distraction as well as putting her in a better relationship to the background hallway and arches. The image is also slightly tilted to the right which to me just adds to the distraction created by the lit column.

    The 2nd image is fine - though I might have waited for the person in the background to move out of the frame.
     
  4. Yes, if the nice lady had been asked to take a step or so backwards, it would have avoided the very distracting light area to the left, and enabled her to be placed in a less central position in the frame.
     
    robert_bowring and jc1305us like this.
  5. Thank you Mike, I really appreciate your thoughts. Yes, it is natural light, and yes the Rolleiflex is an AWESOME camera! I was like you, a digital shooter only, but like many others, I got the itch to try film. (I used film point and shoots as a kid, but I don't consider that experience) I started out with a Canon Cannot, & a Yashica electro. Neither really scratched the itch so to speak, and so I spoke to my photo teacher who suggested medium format. ( I thought it was too complicated for me) but I went and bought a Rolleicord on eBay, and shot it. Really enjoyed it, but the more research I did, I knew I'd have to have the Rolleiflex. (Three later and I landed on the grand daddy, the 2.8f) Its a conversation starter for sure, and is built like a tank.
     
    mikemorrell likes this.
  6. I may crop the first photo to achieve that, I see what you saying. I was a bit afraid there wouldn't be enough light on her face, so I had her stand a bit closer to the entryway. No flash on the camera.
     
  7. I agree that the light wall on the left in the first portrait is distracting. You could burn it in to darken it or maybe just crop it out. I have a Rolleiflex 2.8E and agree that they are awesome cameras. Keep using yours.
     
    jc1305us likes this.
  8. I'm with everyone else in that you could have had your subject step back and put her more in line with the arches, Im not sure it would have made any sort of difference you couldn't. have overcome- in terms of light on her. I like the street shot of the sax player.

    I'm always caught off guard at how great Tri-X is. Both of these are nice in terms of shading, tonality etc.
     
    jc1305us likes this.

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