Photos in Switzerland

Discussion in 'Nature' started by bruce, Apr 15, 1998.

  1. I am an avid outdoor photographer. I have done both shows and assignment oriented photography. Each year my partner (wife) and I go on at least 3 "photo adventures." This year, we are going to miss out on one of these trips as we are going to Europe to visit family in the "old country." We will have about 1 free week during this trip. We will be staying in Germany, but plan on doing some photography in the Swiss Alps. Does anyone know about a subject, place, or natural area that we should not miss while we're in the Switzerland/Bavarian area. Your response is greatly appreciated!
    regards
    bruce
    bt_photo@sprynet.com
     
  2. <P>Take a look at the "Where to go in Switzerland and South Germany?" thread in the regular photo.net Q&A forum. Although the thread veers off topic, there are some useful responses.
     
  3. I lived in Switzerland for a year. Alas, it was before I was serious about photography. There are many beautiful places there. Since the aforementioned thread doesnt specifically mention the area..If I had a week Id spend it in the Berner Oberland (off-season would be best). Interlaken is the jumping-off-point, but you want to be in one of the villages thats near the beautiful Lauterbrunnen Valley and the famous Eiger, Monch and Jungfrau peaks. I was there in June. The tourists were scarce, the valley was in bloom, the many waterfalls were full, and the snow caps were still deep. I think if I went back today with some wide angle lenses and a bunch of Velvia (and a bunch of SFr. its an expensive place) Id be able to make some nice photographs. At the time I thought Id created some masterpieces with a Minolta p&s and Ektachrome 200! Ignorance is bliss. Alles Gutes!
     
  4. Ride the tram to the top of the Schlitthorn for a great 360 degree
    view of the Swiss Alps. This is a great vantage point for pictures
    of Eiger, Monch and Jungfrau.

    <p>

    The tram leaves from Grindelwald. I'm not sure that the tram runs all
    year long. It cost about 65 Swiss Francs two years ago when I was
    here.
     
  5. I started the tread "Where to go in South Germany and Switzerland" a couple of months ago. My stay there ended a couple of weeks ago so it is time to look back and share some of my experiences.

    <p> Altough I worked near Stuttgart, I only had two opportunities
    to go in the direction of Switzerland. One my first trip I did not get further than the BodenSee where I spend a very pleasant afternoon in a
    small university town called Konstant. Got some great shots of the
    swans on the lake and a hot air balloon. The Boden See is a very nice area and worth the visit.

    <p> My second trip was to Zurich which is worth a visit as well.
    Unfortunately I did not make it to the Swiss Alps.

    <p> A general piece of advice which I like to repeat is to buy film in the US. I checked the prices of Velvia film in Germany and found that it was generally twice as expensive as in the States.
     
  6. Living in that small university town (it's called Konstanz or sometimes Constance in English) at the lake-side of the Bodensee (Lake Constance) it's a pleasure for me to second Arjen's comments regarding the Bodensee area. But unfortunately I have little experience with Switzerland which, I confess, is a real shame having in mind that the border is less than 5 minutes away from my apartment. Therefore I can not contribute any further to this subject.

    <p>

    One last note with respect to film prices: Velvia is available for about 14.5 German marks (~8 USD), Sensia II 100 for about 7.5 marks (~4.15 USD). I do not know Swiss prices but I would be surprised if they are lower.
     
  7. The great thing about both Switzerland and Bavaria is that they both look exactly like they're supposed to -- lots of hills alive with the sound of music, and onion domed churches -- and it's not hard to find them both in abundance. Plus lakes, derndl skirts, frothing mugs of beer, cow-bells, feathered hats; they are nothing if not traditional parts of the world.

    <p>

    Cities like Munich, or Geneva, are, by contrast, lively modern cities, with nice historical areas, as well as more modern stuff, powerhouses of strong cultures and economies. And both have long and resonant histories too, as I am sure we all know.

    <p>

    Gute Reise!
     
  8. Well, it's really not in Switzerland, but close enough I suppose. If you the time, visit Chamonix and the nearby Arve valley for some spectacular scenery. The train trip from Chamonix (in France) to Geneva takes you through some beautiful scenery, and there are lots of trekking routes near Chamonix. Places like L'Aiguille du Midi, Mer de Glace (Mont Blanc's glacier) are once in a lifetime experience.
     
  9. Hi Bruce,

    <p>

    So many different answers and not a single one from Switzerland! Let me be the first Swiss national to give you some hints.

    <p>

    The suggestions about the Bernese Oberland (Interlaken, Grindelwald etc.) are good but there are other interesting locations. Further to the East is a mountain area called "Santis" with cable car facilities and and excellent view over Lake Constance (Bodensee), the Alps and the lower parts of our country, called "Mittelland". To the West, in the French speaking part, you will find the Jura mountains, abundant with wildlife such as European lynx (too shy to be photographed) and European ibex (quite cheeky sometimes and excellent photographic subjects). Other lovely areas are to be found around the lakes of Neuchatel, Bienne and Morat as well as Lake Geneva with beautiful shorelines and wildlife refuges of international importance.

    <p>

    I hope the Swiss Tourist Authority reads this and sends me a cheque.

    <p>

    Feel free to contact me by e-mail for more specific discussions.

    <p>

    Cheers, Hans
     

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