Photoflo 200

Discussion in 'Black and White' started by robert_boyer, Sep 9, 2000.

  1. I am having a consistent problem with Kodak Photoflo 200. If I mix a large batch with tap water there seems to be crap growing in it after about a week. I don't really want to go with distiled water for large batches, has anyone else had and solved this problem?
     
  2. I don't see the advantage of mixing photoflo solution in advance.I
    just add a drop or two to enough water to cover the film,that's
    all.And of course i never had that problem.Using distilled or at
    least filtered(this is what i do) water is a good idea
    regardless,though.
     
  3. I do as Cem does. After being stingy for too long, I gave up and buy
    distilled water for PhotoFlo use only. I ruined too many negatives
    using tap water.

    <p>

    chris
     
  4. Robert,

    <p>

    I've used two public darkrooms, and in both of these, one always had
    to check whether the photoflo had gotten "filmy". I think this is
    normal for this stuff. They used tap water, but I don't know if
    distilled water would make a difference. The only solution I can
    suggest is use small batches--some folks even use just a tiny amount
    "one-shot". Some time ago, I stopped using a wetting agent, and
    after washing the film in tap water, I finish washing the film with
    distilled water. So far, it has worked fine.
     
  5. Edwal LFN low foam wetting agent is a superior product. You only
    need to add a drop or two per liter of water. You should always use
    distilled water anyway.
     
  6. I use distilled water for everything. It just removes one variable,
    at not much cost.

    <p>

    Why make up large amounts of PhotoFlo anyway? I mix a little more
    than needed for my tanks, and use it until I neeed to mix more, or it
    gets funky.

    <p>

    I do a last rinse in distilled water after washing, then into PhotoFlo
    (going to try Edwal LFN) mixed in distilled water.
     
  7. I mix my Photoflo 200 as a one shot using the bottle cap. Instructions printed on the label. I've been doing this for YEARS with no problem.
     
  8. Have to agree with Ed on the LFN, I tried it years ago and then through
    away all my Photoflo. You can use a drop of it in your developer also
    to release the water tension to cure any and all airbells!!! The stuff
    is great!
    Cheers
     
  9. Robert,

    <p>

    I just use a small soda straw as a pipette and "suck out" just a
    little for the tank. My water here is pretty clean so I don't bother
    with distilled water.

    <p>

    I found that mixed photoflo goes bad .. and eventually smells.

    <p>

    Ken
     
  10. I dole out my Photoflo from a dropper. One drop per 2 oz of water, use
    once and discard.
     
  11. I myself have never had those problems with Photoflo. Have you also
    rinsed out your bottles with boiling water? Whatever organic scum is
    growing probably is not killed with just washing the bottle out with
    cold water, and is there the next time you use the bottle. I change
    Photoflo about every couple of weeks or so, just from useage.
     
  12. From the Kodak Photo-Flo web page: (http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/health/tiDocs/ti0688/ti0688.shtml)
    Scum on the dry film or plate:
    If the concentration of the working strength KODAK PHOTO-FLO Solution is too high, it can cause a scum to form on the film or plate surfaces. If this occurs, rewash the film and retreat it in PHOTO-FLO Solution of reduced concentration.
    Scumming can also result from old solutions, biological growth, or solutions that have accumulated gelatin, etc. from over-use.
    Scum on the base side usually can be removed by wiping carefully with a clean soft cloth, chamois, or cotton ball. Scum on the emulsion side can be harder to detect, and usually requires re-washing to remove.
    Storing Solutions
    Concentrates of PHOTO-FLO Solution should last indefinitely if the container is tightly capped.
    Because of the convenience and high concentration of the liquid concentrates, mixing of working solution just before use is recommended. Also because of the high concentration of PHOTO-FLO Solution, "one-shot" use delivers the highest quality final rinse while remaining economical.
    Capacity
    The surfactant capacity of a working tank of PHOTO-FLO Solution will depend in part on the amount of film put through it, the quality of the water used in mixing, and the length of time a working solution is kept in service. Generally, it is recommended that the solution be changed when it begins to bead, streak, or leave scum on the surface of films or plates, or once per week, whichever is sooner.
    Formation of slime on tank walls, and / or evidence of biological growth in the tank are also indications that the solution should be changed more frequently.
     
  13. </b>Nuts, I missed a tag! Sorry about all the bold face.
     
  14. </b></b></b><small>Nutty HTML... &gt;:(
     
  15. also try tetenal mirasol, the only one with fungicide and bactericide agents,
     

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