Pet peeves - let's hear them

Discussion in 'Casual Photo Conversations' started by davidmantilla, Apr 13, 2011.

  1. Here's mine: So, I'm walking in NY's Grand Central Terminal (GCT) and I see people shooting the beautiful cavernous hall with flash. No, they're not using flash for fill-light for portraits of their friends and loved ones.. just of the HUGE hall. And I'm not talking about point and shoot or smartphone cameras users (they are exempt)... I'm talking about dSLR users with expensive gear (nice-looking glass and battery grip) and attached flash unit (people I would think know what they're doing given their expensive equipment -- if you have a battery grip you really need to know what an f-stop is).
    I saw someone adjusting the flash intensity and fiddling with their camera trying to "make it work." (I won't mention the camera brand since I see more and more people picking up dSLRs and treating them like P&S no matter the brand). Hmmm, how about a long exposure? No tripods allowed in GCT, so I was sympathetic, but really? trying to light up GCT w/ a flash unit? I know that's a great flash unit you bought, but bouncing light off a green, curved 40 foot-high ceiling is probably not going to work. So I asked this person, "hey nice camera, what kind of lens are you using? what f/stop?" and they very honestly responded "I don't know." I thought to myself, wow, you bought a prime lens, a big flash unit, a battery grip, and don't know what an f-stop is. (perhaps they borrowed the camera from their friend) I very nicely suggested they try resting the camera at an angle against the floor or marble railing and use a long exposure at f/3.5 (widest aperture) and wished them luck.
    Before people jump on me here.. I too was a newbie at one point, so my pet peeve isn't towards other newbies... and I'm not talking about the P&S and smartphone crowd (though they're guilty of this too)... instead at over-use and over dependence on auto camera controls, and hubris at thinking that a flash unit is going to light up GCT, and the lack of "common sense". Maybe this particular person borrowed their friend's camera, so I'm not directing against that person either, but I would think the idea of shooting flash into a far-away moon-lit landscape, or in this case, an enormous hall where the flash's light won't be making it's way back to your camera sensor as a "common sense" moment: "this isn't going to work, let me try something different". I hope the paint doesn't fade prematurely on the constellations painted in GCT's ceiling because of all the nonstop flash, because that would really upset me ;)
     
  2. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    Why worry about what other people do? If they ask, I help them. Otherwise, why should I care? It's their life.
     
  3. I fondly remember when the whole stadium was lit at night by thousands of point and shoot cameras flashing away. Better than most light shows, but I am sorry I never took a picture of it.
    Pet peeves? nah, I just love everybody. :|
     
  4. Otherwise, why should I care? It's their life
    Pet peeves? nah, I just love everybody. :|​
    True.. Little attitude adjustment helps, I guess. ... still bothers me when people hit artwork with flash... doesn't that fade the paint over time? Or just a museum/old-wives tale? Anyway... I need to do more shooting, and less ranting ;)
     
  5. Americans who say "I could care less" when they mean "I couldn't care less".
    Pluralisation of words which can already be used as plural e.g. "advice(s)".
    The wrong use of "there", "their" and "they're".
    Use of the word "invite" in the phrase "I sent you an invite". No you didn't, you sent an invitation. Invite is a verb, not a noun.
    The phrase "my bad". Bad is not a noun so you can't own it.
    I could go on.... and probably will later!
     
  6. Oh, I probably have a lot of pet peeves. One of them is that it's really difficult to attach the cable release to my 5D Mark II when I have it mounted in portrait mode using an L-bracket. One of the few things that I find superior about the Nikon design is that the cable release mounts on the front of the camera rather than side of it.
    Hey Canon! Fix this on the 5D Mark III! Some of us actually use TRIPODS!
    Another pet peeve is people who walk up beside me in an attempt to "take the same picture." I can understand this if we're in a crowded location, but if you've thirty miles of Grand Canyon South Rim to work with you don't need to stand next to my back pocket to take a nice shot. Think for yourself!
    Another pet peeve is the aperture and shutter speed controls on large format lenses. Difficult to read in low light, inconsistent direction of controls, extremely difficult to use with filters attached.
     
  7. Well, Steve, how about?
    -- Improper use of the reflexive - "Ask Steve or myself if you need any help."


    -- First person subject pronoun used as an object - "Come shoot with Steve and I." - Oh, that one makes me cringe!
    And while we're at it...
    Pluralisation of words which can already be used as plural e.g. "advice(s)".​
    -- Languages that spell words with 's' when the letter should clearly be a 'z'! ;-)
     
  8. Languages that spell words with 's' when the letter should clearly be a 'z'!​
    I believe that language is called English, not American. i.e. we are correct!
    Some more:
    Incorrect use of the word "may" when the correct word is "might". e.g. "I may do something" implies permission to do it. "I might do something" implies that there is a chance that I will do it.
    Improper use of the word "momentarily" as in the phrase "I will be with you momentarily". This means that I will not stay for very long!
    Using "try and do it" when the correct phrase is "try to do it".
    I'm sure there will be more soon!
     
  9. Pet peeves?
    Complaints about how other people use language.
    Complaints about complaints about how other people use language.
    And Steve:
    Using "try and do it" when the correct phrase is "try to do it".​
    The phrase should really be, "try to do it when I get a round tuit." (What is a "tuit" anyway? And in what other shapes do they come?)
     
  10. Complaints about how other people use language.​
    Mine are always tongue in cheek as I know language is evolving.
    I have had several letters from my children's schools with poor grammer and spelling. These have been corrected with a red pen and sent back to the school.

    Just thought of a few more: Mixing up "to", "too" and "two". And writing "loosing" instead of "losing".
    And there's always "alot" or even "allot" being used in place of "a lot" and "should of" in place of "should have".
    Muphry's law will take place very soon in this thread: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muphry's_law
    Muphry's law is an adage that states that "if you write anything criticising editing or proofreading, there will be a fault of some kind in what you have written.
    (as there was in that sentence from Wikipedia - which I have corrected for you!).
     
  11. Only one. People who think that every word that ends with an "s" needs an apostrophe.
     
  12. I didn't mention the apostophe one as it's a bit obvious but I have seen apostrophes (not apostrophe's) in odd places too.
    A café near me had a sign offering the usual menu of sausage's, tomato's, chip's, etc. but it was also selling toas't.
    And a house in my town had a sign outside listing items for sale. One was a ga's barbecue.
    Local classified advertisements are often a good source of interesting material too. I recently saw one for a George Formby* Grill and also some storage boxes for sale - "useful for storage" if you weren't sure what to do with them!
    * http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Formby,_Jr.
     
  13. If anyone in NYC were to draw my ire , it would have to be those wonderfully considerate, safe driving cabbies. (Thanks for all those un-signaled turns,sudden mid street stops, and turns from the wrong lanes).Who gives a stale street pretzel about the out of towners, and their inability to operate their cameras?
     
  14. If anyone in NYC were to draw my ire , it would have to be those wonderfully considerate, safe driving cabbies.​
    Those we have in London (actually, most of the UK) are the same. It's understandable though as it's very difficult to move that heavy lever which operates the indicators (turn signal).
     
  15. The person who, when I am making a 2 minute exposure of the inside of a church or similar building, walks up in front of my Mamiya TLR, peers into the lens and says, "Is this a camera?"
    Oh, and Steve - "It's 'grammar' not 'grammer'. Just thought I'd mention that. :)
     
  16. I didn't mention the apostophe one as it's a bit obvious but I have seen apostrophes (not apostrophe's) in odd places too.​
    But Steve, I know many intelligent people, including one contributor to photo.net who has helped me and countless others with photography, who never know when to use "its" and when to use "it's." It doesn't bother me at all. I had to point out the error when I was grading student papers, but I'm not going to worry about the whole world making that mistake.
     
  17. Another Americanism I don't understand is the use of the word "guess" to affirm something.
    e.g. in response to the question, "are you going out tonight?" might be the answer "I guess"
    To Americans, that seems to mean yes. To me, it means you're not sure.
     
  18. I remember an evening in Shanghai, some time ago, when a man with a top dollar DSLR, tripod, and huge flash took several flash-lit photos of the skyline of the Pudong-side of the Bund. There must have been some 500 metres between him and his subject, and yet that flash was working hard with every shot.
     
  19. Yep, Steve, we Americans are an illiterate pesky lot...I guess.
     
  20. Here's mine... ...people shooting the beautiful cavernous hall with flash.... ...of the HUGE hall.... ... I'm talking about dSLR users with expensive gear​
    Why is this a "peeve"? What's the negative effect on you?
     
  21. Another Americanism I don't understand is the use of the word "guess" to affirm something.
    To Americans, that seems to mean yes. To me, it means you're not sure.​
    The use is actually somewhere in the middle. Think of it as yes without full commitment.
     
  22. The use is actually somewhere in the middle. Think of it as yes without full commitment.​
    I have heard it used: Question: "What's your favourite colour?" Answer: "Blue I guess". Your favourite colour (or color if you must) is a definite, not a perhaps!
     
  23. Steve - I really hope you don't have a Facebook account. The spelling and grammar used is atrocious. The most common correction I point out is "damn" not "dam". It must be an American thing seeing as they drop the "u" from colour, neighbour and rumour and a "cheque" is a "check" when Americanized.
    I'm Canadian, eh.
     
  24. Steve - I really hope you don't have a Facebook account. The spelling and grammar used is atrocious.​
    Not on my page!
    It's not the bad spelling I object to on Facebook, it's the use of mobile phone type text including numbers in words and missing out vowels to make things simpler.
     
  25. Gearheads in general, but especially those who--
    1) Praise a lense (sic) and post a half-dozen banal, out-of-focus snapshots to demonstrate its virtues.
    2) Have either no images visible (on the Web) or else a collection of utterly wretched ones, but insist on making recommendations about equipment, technique, etc. as though they had some basis for this.
     
  26. The spelling and grammar used is atrocious.​
    The above sentence should read, "The spelling and grammar used are atrocious."
     
  27. When I see stuff like that is mentioned , I will help if I think it will be welcomed , otherwise I just shake my head and walk away thinking of all the dumb mistakes I have made [LOL]
     
  28. Hiking for miles, then realized ooops, did not bring a spare battery.
     
  29. James G. Dainis

    James G. Dainis Moderator

    To bring this back into the realm of photography before it gets zapped to the Off-Topic forum - People who move far away from the camera so they can be part of the picture. I used to see tourists, after spotting the statue of liberty or the Empire stated building several blocks away, move 30 feet closer (further away from the camera) to have their picture taken with the Empire State building. They could be four or five feet from the camera for a nice head to waist shot and the building would still be the same size in the background. The background doesn't move if you do. My wife wanted her picture taken in the lobby of the Airport Hotel in Hong Kong but she absolutely refused to get closer to the camera.
    00YZCG-348239584.jpg
     
  30. James G. Dainis

    James G. Dainis Moderator

    ... and of course when she saw the photo she lamented, "But I am so small you can't even tell it is me. I thought you knew how to take good pictures."
     
  31. Hmm, I sort of like how this thread, which could have been disastrous, has righted itself and sails on, mostly unswamped.
    English, thanks be to Odin, escaped its original owners ages ago, and has never been vexed or hobbled by language purists the way some (nudge, nudge, wink ...) languages have been, to their eternal detriment and fossilization.
    Free-range English, that's the stuff, in all its vitality and vigor. OMG and LOL are, as some of you know, now in the Oxford English Dictionary.
     
  32. The above sentence should read, "The spelling and grammar used are atrocious."​
    Damn, I missed that. I was going to post "the spelling is atrocious" and then added grammar forgetting to pluralize is.
     
  33. I hate it when I am getting setup for a shot, either perhaps kneeling or on the tripod, and somebody just steps in front of me with their cellphone and takes a picture.
    I shot a wedding last year. I was sitting in the aisle in an attempt to get the couples walking up the aisle after the ceremony. Guess what? As soon as they started their walk, a hand comes out from a pew, holding a cellphone, taking a movie, right in the middle of my shot!
    Two weeks ago, I was asked to get a group shot for a 60th anniversary party. I got the group assembled and stepped back far enough to get the whole group in. I was down on one knee and ready to shoot. And then, up walk two gals in front of me, each with a hand full of P&S cameras and start taking pictures! They knew me, they knew I was trying to get the picture, and yet...
    Arghh....
     
  34. OMG and LOL are, as some of you know, now in the Oxford English Dictionary.​
    That doesn't make it right!
    i almost forgot the common mixup up of your and you're.
     
  35. 1) People that say they are "photographers" who apply the same purchased (MCP or Jen's Fabulous Stuff) action to each and every portrait they take....
    These tend to be parents who where told by a family member - "hey - you take really good photos - you ought to go into the business..." and who have no clue about the workings of a camera, flash or lenses.
    2) People who name drop - ex: I studied under - Monte / Moose / Rockwell.... whomever.... I don't care who you studied under - show me that you learned something other than a photoshop action from them...
    3) People that walk by a photo shoot and ask - "Are you taking pictures?" - No - we're plotting to blow the place up and the camera is our cover... Then they proceed to plant themselves in what they consider to be in out of the way spot (but it's not)...
    Dave
     
  36. I've lost count of my pet peeves but here is a recent one.
    I set up at the start of a parade route standing on a street corner. This area is not the main parade route and so there were no "Spectators" crowding around for a good view of the parade. Most of the people milling about were involved with the parade one way or another. I stood on the OUTSIDE curve as the parade makes a right turn to enter the main drag - moving from my right to left. With the sun behind me this provides a photo opportunity to photograph each parade participant as they approach, turn and depart without obstruction of other participants. I thought I was pretty clever to position myself in such a strategic location. I stood at the corner with my toes hanging off the edge of the curb and a eight foot wide sidewalk behind me. For the entire duration of the parade pedestrians kept short-cutting the corner passing directly in front of my line of photography! About 1/4 of my photos have the back of some stranger's bust along the bottom portion of the image. I think I might start a special photo album just for these things...
     
  37. People who year after year here still spell "a lot" as "alot" or "allot". WTF?
    "Lense" -- again, WTF?
    Pros shooting outdoors without lens hoods.... WTF?!
    "I could care less..." WTF!
     
  38. I agree about the lens hood Ken, I use one all the time. I borrowed my Dad's 18-200mm VR lens for my trip to Florida last week and was using the hood when a gentleman with a Canon DSLR asked me why I used a hood as he has seen a lot of professionals use one. So I explained to him how it blocks unwanted light and helps protect the front element in case of physical contact with a solid object. It felt niced to be asked.
    Since I haven't posted a peeve yet - how about those who grab a photo you took of them and posted to Facebook and then take said photo and use it as a Profile Picture and don't give you any credit when someone comments on it or even say thanks. My wife's family is bad for this. (I don't share photos on Facebook except with friends.) I post them for the enjoyment of the family and I try to take flattering pictures of people and even do some editting in Photoshop to get rid of stuff like yellowed teeth and pimples. A simple, "yes, it is a nice picture - Jay took it at so and so's birthday party" would suffice.
     
  39. Steve Smith [​IMG], Apr 14, 2011; 01:55 a.m.
    Americans who say "I could care less" when they mean "I couldn't care less".
    Pluralisation of words which can already be used as plural e.g. "advice(s)".
    The wrong use of "there", "their" and "they're".
    Use of the word "invite" in the phrase "I sent you an invite". No you didn't, you sent an invitation. Invite is a verb, not a noun.
    The phrase "my bad". Bad is not a noun so you can't own it.
    I could go on.... and probably will later!​
    People, from any country, who happily correct others but don't know quotation marks go on the outside of sentence ending punctuation, not inside.
    Just kidding.
    Kind of...
     
  40. My granddaughter lived with us last year and was in first grade in school. When she got home from school she would always do her reading assignment with me and I consistently found improper grammar in her school issued reading books. When I finally questioned the teacher why they would want to teach improper grammar, punctuation and capitalization, her reply was: "this is Reading class, not Grammar. We don't get into Grammar until 3rd grade". So teach them the wrong way and then have to re-teach them the proper way later?
     
  41. Using 's' in place of a 'z' is no more right than driving on the left.


    'I guess' can imply resignation to an unpleasant situation. "Aren't we going to visit my mother this weekend?" - "I guess."


    Taxis in New York. There's a special place in my heart for the idiot who dropped me off in the left lane of the West Side Highway
    just as the light was about to change.
     
  42. Your speling is atroshous.
     
  43. The use is actually somewhere in the middle. Think of it as yes without full commitment.
    I have heard it used: Question: "What's your favourite colour?" Answer: "Blue I guess". Your favourite colour (or color if you must) is a definite, not a perhaps!
    That response in that scenario usually indicates that recipient of the question hasn't given much thought to the issue and is providing a hastily considered or partially indifferent response which might cause the response to be incorrect or subject to change. Like I said, it is a response with out a full commitment to the answer. Even if British sensibilities make it appear otherwise.
     
  44. Pet Peeve: When shooting at a beach, dog owners who allow their dogs to harass me while shooting knocking over tripods, pissing in the camera bag and telling me their dog won't bother me while its its aggressively barking or growling in attack position with fangs protruding. Its especially fun when the owner just stands there and does nothing but watch or lamely tells Fido not to do that while it just continues.
    My big Monfrotto tripod make for an excellent club to swing now that I think about it.
     
  45. Using 's' in place of a 'z' is no more right than driving on the left.​


    It's equally right (or correct) as driving on the left! Anyway, as the original spelling of the word was with an s, we are not using it in place of a z. However, you are using a z in place of an s.
    but don't know quotation marks go on the outside of sentence ending punctuation, not inside.​
    Yes. I know..... It just doesn't look right to me!
    And finally tonight, Another Americanism I don't understand is "listen up." Is this to differentiate it from listening down or left or right?
    I don't like "wait up" either.
     
  46. The up in listen up is used to emphasize the seriousness and need to actually listen. Wait up is a request or directive for someone to stay in the position they are currently in in order for the speaker to 'catch up' to them. THen there is the more recent usage of the phrase "man up". I'm sure you'll love that one.
     
  47. Not really peeves, because I really don't care, I just feel a little bad for people who have obviously bought a new "kit" and upgraded it to include a toothpick tripod and a polarising filter that they screw onto their lens and leave it there, even when shooting inside. They also often have their lens hood reversed whilst shooting outside in the sun.
    As for all the pronunciation and word use, some rankles but I really don't care. But when did "taking pictures" become "shooting", and why?
     
  48. Listen up: we also say 'listen here', but it tends to be more colloquial and dismissive. "Now, you listen here, young
    man!"


    Quotes on the outside confuse my iPad spell checker.


    I always hated the apostrophes after a plural possessive: My brothers' houses are in Dallas and Chicago. Why not
    my brothers's houses? The British have St. James's Park, after all.


    My brother-in-law's family is from North Carolina and West Virginia. They've got some real gems: 'out yonder' and
    'them thar' are two of my favorites. "Them went down to pick up a new truck engine out yonder with them thar friends
    of theirs. Y'all should see it. It's purt near bran new!" I thought people said that only in cowboy movies.
     
  49. Wow, nice pictures! You must have a professional camera.

    Yes, how about I lend it to you for a day and we'll see how your pictures turn out?
     
  50. when did "taking pictures" become "shooting"​
    Which one came first?
     
  51. Wow, nice pictures! You must have a professional camera.​
    http://www.gavingough.com/wp-content/uploads//2009/01/wtd95.gif
     
  52. John,
    I doubt if Ansel Adams, HCB etc referred to their picture taking as "shooting", I never heard the expression used until my first interactions with US photographers, sorry, shooters, in the 1990's.
     
  53. Wow, with so many English grammar-related posts that I think we have more English teachers than photographers on this board :p I kinda assumed we would stick to photography-related pet peeves in the casual photo conversations forum, but I guess I was wrong.
    I have to concur about the lens-hood-on-backwards faux pas...cracks me up whenever I see that, especially when people shoot all day like that (why not leave hood at home?). Reminds me of umbrellas w/ built-in retractable hard plastic cover. Just looks funny when it's not fully extended.
     
  54. My pet peeve is people who shoot belt fed large format camera's.
     
  55. I get asked often, "What camera should I buy?" I ask what they will be doing, and all the right questions. Usually I recommend they get a $200 P&S. They inevitably buy a gigantic $1,000 dSLR, which they need like a hole in the head. Ok, the pet peeve is coming up now. They come to me with their new SuperNovaXtreme 4000GX/12i, and want me to unbollox the unit which has been accidentally set to some absurd condition by pressing menu after menu. Asking if they read the manual, is of course, hopelessly optimistic. "No, I didn't understand all that gobblygook."
    A few times I showed my impatience with, "This is why I told you to buy the Simple1000 model." "Yeah, but my husband said this one was a lot better." Well, for the next 6 months I am the "go to guy" to set/fix/reset/configure/reconfigure the camera. Of course, all they ever do is put it on AUTO and zoom away. I am learning patience. It is a small pet peeve and frankly more amusing than annoying.
    Since I answered a photographic pet peeve, does that earn me a small shot at the language question? I was once a strict language nazi myself, and was disgusted with all the LOLing about. No more. I now believe that it's every bit as absurd to demand strict formalized written language as it would be to suggest that no one should use Photoshop to play with "formally recorded images." Communications techniques are redefining language exactly as Photoshop is redefining the image. Stiff branches break off in the wind.
     
  56. The up in listen up is used to emphasize the seriousness and need to actually listen. Wait up is a request or directive for someone to stay in the position they are currently in in order for the speaker to 'catch up' to them.​
    I know what they mean, why they mean it is what I don't understand.
     
  57. I kinda assumed we would stick to photography-related pet peeves in the casual photo conversations forum​
    A foolish presumption but lets see if we can steer it back to your original intention!
    Referring to items of equipment (usually lenses) as copies e.g. "I think I might have a bad copy of this lens as mine is not sharp" leads me to think that the writer should have bought a real one rather than a copy.
     
  58. The AF and IS switches on canon tele lenses are positioned so that if you're shooting portrait oriented shots with a
    tripod and the collar you can't get to them without rotating the camera.
     
  59. Interesting comments about lens hoods. It makes me want to set up a test of with/without hood shots. It would be
    interesting to see if anyone can actually identify the shots with the hood consistently. Except for lighting that might
    cause flare, I'll bet that the results would average out to about the same as a coin toss.


    When did "shooting" or "making an exposure" become "capture?"


    When did pictures become photographs, and when did photographs become images?


    And what is a digital photographer? Someone who takes photographs of fingers? Either you're a photographer or
    you're not. Are you defined by your skills and knowledge and vision, or are you defined by the gear that you used for a particular project?
     
  60. People, from any country, who happily correct others but don't know quotation marks go on the outside of sentence ending punctuation, not inside.​
    I would have once agreed with this, but not any more. It logically just makes so much more sense to not have extraneous material inside the quotation marks which is NOT part of the quotation. Not to mention how much easier it is to type with the marks in order with the meaning, not the convention. It's not that we don't "know", it's that we have moved on from the outdated constraints of the printed page.
    Here are some very useful German phrases for this sort of thing:
    Ha - Das war nichts. [Ha, that's nothing]
    Gestern warf ich ein Gummipapier auf dem Marktplatz! [Yesterday, I threw a gum wrapper on the square]
    Ich bin ein Anarchist/Amerikaner. [I am an anarchist/American.]
    w/ apologies to Wicked German for the Traveler
     
  61. dlw

    dlw

    I have two, they're both related, and they annoy the hell out of me.
    1. People who seemingly have no clue what a turn signal lever is used for. This includes both making a turn and lane changes.
    2. When making a turn, the turner turns not into the lane closest to them, but crosses that lane and goes into the other, ie. person makes a left turn onto a roadway with two lanes of traffic in both directions, but instead of turning into the inside lane, they go directly to the outside lane. They should instead, turn into the inside lane and once there, use their turn signal to indicate a lane change into the outside lane.
     
  62. On the subject of turn signals, here is one which I hate. (US residents who drive on the wrong side of the road will have to swap left and right to understand this).
    When approaching a roundabout to turn right (third exit of a four junction roundabout) the correct procedure is to indicate right, then just before exiting the roundabout, indicate left so that drivers waiting to join the roundabout know where you are going.
    About half of the drivers I see in the UK do not indicate at all. A big percentage of the half that do manage to keep their right indicator on when exiting the roundabout.
    Not using indicators is the height of laziness as they are probably the easiest to operate of all of the controls in a car and your hand is right next to the lever whilst you are driving.
     
  63. it

    it

    Gearheads.
     
  64. David W -
    Two to add to yours -
    1) Masters of the pump fake - people that are turning in one direction but go to the opposite direction to make the turn - so if they are turning right - they swing into the left lane to make the turn.... Come on folks - you're not driving a bus or 18 wheeler!
    2) The fake turners or undecided... they use turn signals - but then go straight or turn the opposite...
    Dave
     
  65. Pedestrians do that 'pump fake' a lot. Especially when they exit a building or an elevator.
     
  66. Having just completed the experience of air travel in the US, my pet peeve today is airport (TSA) security. When did frisking grandmothers turn into a national security strategy? Thankfully I travel less by air these days.
     
  67. From the OED, v. 2
    f.III.22.f transf. intr. and trans. To take a snapshot (of) with a camera; to photograph (a scene, action, person, etc.) with a cinematographic camera; to take (cinematographic film), to film; occas. with the actor as subject.

    1890 Anthony's Photogr. Bull. III. 3 Beside him is another sort of shutter operator with an ordinary camera and fairly good shutter.‥ Does he shoot when his companion did? 1892 Photogr. Ann. II. 51 We at first tried the other method, namely, looking at the object and shooting at the critical moment. 1896 Punch 30 May 264/2, I even bless the Kodak now With which, dear Nell, you ‘shot’ me. 1916 ‘B. M. Bower’ Phantom Herd ii. 22 He‥debated whether it should be ‘shot’ with two cameras or three. 1919 Conquest Dec. 70/2 First, the camera man ‘shoots’ on the tank containing the fishes with one half of the lens open. 1930 E. Waugh Vile Bodies ix. 156 ‘All right,’ said one of the men with megaphones.‥ ‘We'll shoot the duel now.’ 1953 Manch. Guardian Weekly 27 Aug. 7/1 While the big-city exhibitors were pondering this expensive outlay a small studio in Hollywood shot a poor film with two interlocking lenses. 1962 Montagu & Leyda tr. Nizhny's Lessons with Eisenstein iii. 66 Could the set-up be so changed as to shoot past Dessalines' back? 1976 Observer (Colour Suppl.) 9 May 10/2 She has also shot the odd film here. 1978 J. Krantz Scruples iii. 77 If anyone was going to go down to the Virgin Islands and shoot three models in next year's monokinis‥it was Hank.
     
  68. Ditto on intrusive airport security and all of the ludicrous geopolitical conditions that necessitate it in the first place.


    And lest we not forget, luggage surcharges for already-expensive flights that can't even offer a free bag of pretzels.
     
  69. Living here in politically correct California, I wonder if the sensitive types found "shoot" too violent and "caaapture" more humane. For those that did, I "machine gun" mine with a burst at 8 fps with my 35 mil. Any of the lovers of the language here miss Carlin's analysis of language too?
     
  70. People who "pour over" things and who have "peaves". ;-)
     
  71. McDonald's. Generally.... but also for their lack of a capital I in their "i'm loving it." advertisements.
     
  72. Mine just hit me. I was looking forward to an afternoon of printing. Got everything set up, and when I started to mix my Dektol, it looked like some really strong tea. Guess it was older than I thought. so It shouldn't be a total loss, I mixed fresh paper fix too. Now just have to wait for it all to cool down.
     
  73. People who say "where's it at" or "where are you going to".
     
  74. My pet peeve is the obsession with lens sharpness and resolution.
     
  75. When I order a large fry at McDonalds and they put the same amount in it as a small. I have gone back in so many
    times that my local McD's will see me and top it off before they give them to me.
     
  76. Spending many hours researching a lens online and with fellow photographers, deciding on a lens, going to the store to buy it, and then getting into an argument with know-it-all clerks about how I should be buying a different lens. I still don't have a wide angle lens because of that, the money is still in my pocket.
    Wandering around a wildlife sanctuary with my humble SLR with 100-300 lens, enjoying the view, and nearly being trampled by some wanna-be pro with huge tripod, over-sized fancy photography bag, camera round his neck with 600 mm lens swinging over his pot belly, Tilley hat and glasses, pretentious vest with pockets filled to the brim with accessories bulging around said pot belly, and nearly shoving me aside to set up the shot. Then comes his buddy with even more gear, and they start yammering about the shots they got this week, which ones have been published in what magazine, and other bragging b.s. in voices so loud that any creature with 1/4 mile has long since dove for cover.
    People that SEE a photographer taking pictures of the crowd, have ben TOLD clearly that photographers are taking pictures, then walk in front of the photographer, put themselves in front of the action...then start b***g out the photographer about how he/she didn't have permission to take their picture, and don't dare publish them.
    Trying to make a left turn, you've waited for oncoming traffic to clear...and there's that ONE last car coming...and the S.O.B. sees your left turn signal...and deliberately slows down so that traffic behind catches up and you miss your chance to turn. Also, on a 4-lane, you're in the left lane doing the speed limit and even more, and some jackass behind you swings out, races ahead of you, and cuts back in to the left lane only to slam the brakes and turn on the left turn signal.
    Tailgaters. I should have a sign in the back window of my truck cap that says "Slow down or pass/Just get my a**!"
    Hissy-speak. Mostly women, young gals do this, hiss their esses when they speak like a demented snake in a horror movie.
    Threads that ask me my pet peeves. I get roped in and show the world I'm a cranky old gal!
     
    • Moderators who banned me from posting for 30 days. (Peeve)
    • People shooting pictures at night of Manhattan from the observation deck on the 86th floor of the Empire State Building with the flashes turned on. It's always funny watching that from the ground. (non-peeve)
     
  77. Talking heads on TV especially Jim Cramer (he's on right now).
     
  78. I go to great lengths to be on time for ANY meeting or function, so for me the most irritating failing in others is unpunctuality without explanation, apology or simple call to warn you.
    Damn, I'm late for my bus >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
     
  79. To Clive:
    Punctuality is the art of knowing how late the other party will be!
     
  80. J.I.T. ?
     

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