Panoramic street photography

Discussion in 'Street and Documentary' started by arond a., Feb 2, 2010.

  1. Hi,
    I'm interested in panoramic candid/street photography but have a hard time finding anything that appeals. Have you or do you know of anyone who has worked in this specific style? In the right hands this format seems to have a lot of potential, although I'm not sure I trust myself to avoid falling for compositional gimmickry, at least initially. Acquiring an Xpan/TX1 seems as much of a commitment as learning a new instrument.
    Thanks,
    Arond
     
  2. I agree, buying a xpan seems like a abit of a commitment. However, I don't view different formats are any specific style per se. I shoot mostly 3:2 but, on occasions, I shoot 6x6, 16:9 4:3 and very rarely, I do swing pano (widelux). Similar in style, I usually find good light, something interesting, compose and shoot with any camera (format) I happen to shoot with. I would suggest masking your digicam/dslr, buy a cheap horizon or even get a widelux F6/7 before spending on a noblex, xpan or any 6x17 cams.
    I once saw the actor Jeff Bridges pano book. It was better than I expected. Check it out if you haven't
     
  3. Hi,
    you may want to take a look at my website, section "XPanded street". Sounds like what you describe (which doesn't mean you have to like it of course)
    www.at-photography.net
     
  4. I've dabbled in doing panoramic street photography. For the most part, since I don't want to invest in a full pano rig, I've
    just gone with my 6x7 and a wide lens, occasionally doing 2 shots ifthe scene permits, or doing "snap-n-stitch" with a
    digital, or shooting wide and cropping to a 6:17 (or thereabouts) ratio. You get the idea.

    Check out Pentti Sammallahti. Though not typical for street photography, as much of it takes place in rural areas of the
    near arctic, he often used panoramic cameras for these scenes with (at least in my opinion) amazing results.
     
  5. I've dabbled in doing panoramic street photography. For the most part, since I don't want to invest in a full pano rig, I've
    just gone with my 6x7 and a wide lens, occasionally doing 2 shots ifthe scene permits, or doing "snap-n-stitch" with a
    digital, or shooting wide and cropping to a 6:17 (or thereabouts) ratio. You get the idea.

    Check out Pentti Sammallahti. Though not typical for street photography, as much of it takes place in rural areas of the
    near arctic, he often used panoramic cameras for these scenes with (at least in my opinion) amazing results.
     
  6. I have done a bunch of Widelux stuff over the years. Some of it has been street photography, documenting opening of a city-owned water park, or a fire or snowstorm or flood in the biz district of a small town.
    I've also done stitched digital. The Widelux is less work / time, esp. if scene changes between digital shots.
    Agreed with Leslie Cheung above, about 99%. Go for a cheap Horizon if all you want is a taste, or make a pinhole camera using an empty paintcan and large-format film. Just saw some ready-made pinholes using 1-gallon paint cans at the Detrait Institute of the Arts, and am VERY tempted to buy one.
    One bit of advice: sun at your back is really important once you start talking about a 120-degree field of view.
    For samples of what can be done in street photography with a swing-lens camera, take a look at links below.
    Rayz Cafe (a week after I ran into my first love there, after no contact for 31 years):
    http://www.photo.net/classic-cameras-forum/00UmvU
    Canal boat:
    http://www.photo.net/classic-cameras-forum/00TSOZ
    Documentary Widelux images around Sandusky, Ohio:
    http://www.photo.net/classic-cameras-forum/00V8tr
    Splash Pad, and Widelux advert:
    http://www.photo.net/classic-cameras-forum/00UB6O
    Route 66, Widelux and Kodak Panoram:
    http://www.photo.net/classic-cameras-forum/00O1Dl
     
  7. Or you could try a Holga-type panoramic mashup (many cameras will allow this) simply by not winding the film on fully each time. It's a bit messy but can give interesting results.
    Hey Leslie. Long time no see you here! HNY!
    [​IMG]
     
  8. I like this one pretty much:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/sinoperture/3954888629/
    It isn't really panoramic, but close to it.
    Also Matjaz Krivic has some great panoramic work, also street:
    http://www.krivic.com/main/page
     
  9. Arond,
    I use a Noblex 135U and 135S for doing street pictures. It's all I've been doing for the last two years. I find that it's the best option of all, as it has a differentiating "look" without being gimmicky, it is among the sharpest options available to me, and it looks the least like a "regular" camera, so people seem to be less alarmed when I photograph in public places.
    Both cameras are typically sold for around $700 to $100US on the used and auction markets, sometimes for much less. I recently bought a mint condition ProSport for $500, which lacks the bubble levels, but I bought a $5 bubble level and glued it on the top of the camera.
    If you are interested in seeing some of the work, check out http://crowdspotting.blogspot.com.
    Best regards,
    Jeff Phillips
    00Voin-222257684.jpg
     
  10. I'm late responding to this topic. My whole thing is swing lens street photo. Have a look at my web page. Ignore the camera building how-too stuff.
    I'm re-doing my pages to pictures-only this winter. It's looking like McGee's closet. If you want a free copy of a film pano camera how-to book it's available there. Also I'd be delighted to discuss pano-street shooting with anyone. I'm going over some old negs that were never printed. The one below is typical of my street work. I'll post a couple of more pans if they show up OK with the size limits on the list.
    00YBMJ-329983584.jpg
     
  11. Jeff - Noblex rules! If I were to own just one swing-lens camera it would be a Noblex. Swing-lens pano cameras have unique image qualities not obtainable with digital. It has to do with the swing and the slit exposure not do-able with digital.
    Pano images are much more than just a wide format. They extend the narrative beyond what can be seen in a single glance. Once you see that you can do interesting street work.
    00YBMy-330005584.jpg
     

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