Opinion on Rollei 6003 System

Discussion in 'Medium Format' started by cing_dao_kan, Oct 14, 1997.

  1. I have used 35mm (Nikon system) for the past 15 years and wanted to get
    into the medium format for some times (although I used medium format TLR
    when I was about 15 years old but quickly moved into 35mm).

    <p>

    Since I have been a Nikon user, a happy one, I would like to consider
    getting into Zeiss optics for medium format. I looked Hasselbald 503
    and could not make up my mind. I like Rollei 6003 system's spec and
    price (though expensive), but have not heard much comments in this
    digest. If I do decide to go with Rollei, I would get the 6003 kit
    first, then add a 50mm and 180mm in the future.

    <p>

    I would like to hear some advises, comments, and experience about the
    Rollei 6003. Is it a good choice for a starter with limited
    experience? One of the concerns that I have is that if Rollei is a
    reliable camera system. (I never have had any serious problem with my
    two Nikon bodies and several Nikkor lenses in the past 15 years) Or if
    Hasselbald 503 is a better choice than Rollei 6003 for a starter like
    me, knowing that they are different type of MF bodies.

    <p>

    Thanks in advance for the help!
     
  2. Hi,

    <p>

    if you rely on mechanics choose a Hasselblad, if you accept electronics, forget Zeiss lenses and consider a Zenza SQ or GS. I am using a Rollei SL66E since 84, but you get an idea about my experience with Rollei quality in my answer to Werner Bvckelein's question to 'Reliability of Rollei SL 66 E'.

    <p>

    Manfred
     
  3. I agree with the essence of the previous reply. All major medium format systems have great optics. Your choice should be based on format (square, rectangular), style (slr, tlr, rangefinder), whether you prefer mechanical or electronic, whether you need high speed flash sync, what focal length lenses you need, whether you need OTF flash or TTL metering, whether you want traditional metal-bodied construction or can tolerate polycarbonate, whether you need interchangeable backs, and finally of course, cost.

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    Rent a few different systems before you buy to see what you like. There are big differences in the photographic experience between the various models. Some stores may allow you to put the rental price towards an eventual purchase.
     
  4. Hi, People. I guess this may sound stupid but this post begs the question: Are you a PHOTOGRAPHER or an EQUIPMENT LOVER? I think that there is a real distinction between the two and one has to search one's soul deeply as to whether one is into photography because he loves making images or whether it is because he loves gizmos/gadgets. I know a pro who does beautiful work on a well-used Bronica SQ-Ai, and a set of beat up Nikons. I also know a well-heeled lawyer who has a coterie of the lastest, fastest Nikon lenses (no doubt costly), a mint F-4 which was promptly traded in for an F-5 when it debuted, a Hassy 503CX which became a 503CXi which metamorphosed into a 503CW when that became available. Photography was just an excuse to collect equipment, and that wasn't any good either. If you're truly in it to make images that move you then any of the well-established medium format brands will serve you well. Your only concerns should be one of format, and price. Okay, one may argue about the resolution, colour, contrast, leaf versus focal plane shutters and what have you, but isn't that like counting angels on the head of a pin. If you're after a brand-name and its resale value even before you've even bought the camera, the Hassy would be a good choice. If you are a true professional for which photography is your only source of income, perhaps the Rollei would be a good buy provided you can afford the superlative Schneider and excellent Zeiss lenses; otherwise spring for the Bronica, Fuji or Mamiya-they get the job done well enough. Pro's work their equipment real hard, trash them, make money off them and then go on to the latest models only if they can help them make even better money. The cliche goes: it's the 'cameraman', and not the camera that makes the pictures. Sorry for the long post but talk to a professional and do some real soul serching before you part with your money. I'll probably get flamed by Hassy owners but how many of them make a serious living on photography with their equipment. As an addendum, Hassy has just released a limited edition burgundy leatherette 503CW; a good clue as to at whom Hassy targets its equipment. You won't find that with the Rollei 6003. I repeat: if you can afford the lenses, Rollei is tops (even I, the churchmouse, succumb); to get work done check out the Japanese stuff. My friend, the pro, swears by his Bronica-Does the Job, Pleases the Clients, Pays the Bill. That's all that counts. Ciao.
     

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