OK to wind M6 and newer body w/o base-plate mounted?

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by rowlett, Nov 1, 2000.

  1. rowlett

    rowlett Moderator

    Similar to Mani's "How far to wind..." this thread is "Can I wind w/o the baseplate on?" Someplace a long time ago, probably the LUG, I read that it causes undue wear and tear on the take-up spool spring mechanism if shutter is advanced (w/film) without the baseplate mounted. I always wind once to make sure the film is engaged before placing the back and baseplate in place. Anything to worry about here? My own feeling is no, that the spring is strong enough not to have the support of the baseplate half of the take-up mechanism.
     
  2. Tony, I just slip the film in and pull it through until it lays in
    the take-up spool. I smooth it flat, reattach the baseplate and
    wind, observing the rewind crank for proper movement. Then I fire
    twice and go. Works for me every single time. I don't think the
    shutter was designed to be advanced without the baseplate on. The
    loading was designed to be so simple and foolproof that it would be
    overkill. Or am I just being a total Leica-babe-in-the-woods about
    it? (probably am...)
     
  3. I talk to the Leica technician at Kindermann Canada and he said
    it was hard on the wind release/counter mechanism. Not as bad
    as trying to do double exposures but not good none the less.

    <p>

    The problem that some M cameras have is with the leading
    edge of the film getting caught on the edge of the camera's film
    gate. When you put the baseplate back on it jams the film
    between the film gate and the baseplate positioning disc. A roll
    of film comes with a kink in it right where it comes out of the
    magazine. When you are loading, flip open the back of the
    camera and make sure that the leading edge of the film is past
    the camera's film gate, place the film according to the diagram,
    button it up and there will be no misloads ever.

    <p>

    Some M cameras are more suseptible to having the film catch
    on the film gate than others. I have never been able to come up
    with a reasonable explanation for this. It helps if you slide the
    film magazine in first with the film going in on a slight angle
    (magazine low and the tip of film high). Once you practice this, it
    becomes very natural and quick to do.

    <p>

    Most people like to blame the take up spool for misloads but, if
    the film clears the gate, it pushed into position by the baseplate's
    positioning wheel and always lines up correctly.

    <p>

    If you want absolutely fool proof loads so you can lend your
    camera to your deaf, blind and dumb friend, just get a ABLON
    film trimming template for the old screw mount cameras and
    trim the film leader. I sometimes do this if I am shooting a whack
    of film in a theater as I or my unsuspecting friend can load the
    cameras without openning the back at all. Too time consuming
    for regular shooting though.

    <p>

    Cheers
     

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