Nikon USA Lens Warranty, No More 1+4 = 5 Years

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by ShunCheung, Apr 7, 2021 at 4:26 PM.

  1. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Previously, Nikon USA had a 1 + 4 = 5-year extended warranty for all Nikkor lenses. (Please keep in mind that was for Nikon USA only.) I understand that program was discontinued earlier this year, around February 2021 or so. At this point, new Nikon USA lenses have the standard one-year warranty.

    Personally, I think this change/reduction makes little real difference. Since 1977, I have bought about 50 new Nikon lenses. I believe I needed warranty repair exactly once within the first year. I don't think I ever needed repair between years 2 to 5. I have dropped a couple of lenses and some AF-S motors eventually failed after like 15 years. None of those are covered by warranty.

    Official statement from Nikon Inc. (Nikon USA):

    Additional info:
    https://www.nikonimgsupport.com/ni/NI_article?articleNo=000001237&configured=1&lang=en_US
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2021 at 9:07 AM
  2. Never within the 1st year (and many of my Nikon lenses come with no warranty or 90 days at best). I did have one repair in year 2 of ownership - the 200-500 that was purchased in November of 2015 needed repair in May of 2017 (and that took two trips to Nikon Los Angeles to get fixed).
     
  3. My Nikkor 20mm f/2.8 AF-D needed repair in the 4th year. Diaphragm blades stuck. Nikon fixed it under warranty.
     
  4. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    My one lens that needed warranty service was a 35-70mm/f2.8 AF from 1990. It is a push-pull zoom, and after a few months, I noticed that every time I push/pull, a new thin layer of dust/powder appear on the inner tube. I think the friction was peeling something off the tube. At the time the Nikon House in Rockefeller Center in Manhattan (NYC) was still around. I took it there and a technician took a look. He told me that I needed to send it to Nikon Melville because that zoom would eventually lock up.

    About 10 years later, that same lens developed the common (for the 35-70) internal fog up issue, but it was out of warranty by then. I still own it but it is not really usable any more. I replaced it by the 28-70mm/f2.8 AF-S in 2012, and the AF-S motor in that lens eventually failed a couple of years ago, after some 17 or so years.

    My 200mm/f4 AF-D macro had a broken AF/MF ring, which is also a common problem for that lens. I think that was after around 5. 6 years, but I bought that lens gray market so that I paid for repair.
     
  5. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    My 20mm/f2.8 AF (pre-D, but essentially the same lens) developed that same problem, during a trip to Antarctica in 1998. Eventually I sent the lens to Nikon to replace the aperture diaphragm for like $200, as it was out of warranty by then (probably around 8 to 10 years old). I eventually sold it.
     
  6. Agree, that's why I don't mind buying gray market when the price is right, and didn't quite understand why so many at PN worry so much about the warranty. After all, there are Nikon services outside of Nikon-USA when there is a need for it.
     
  7. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Mary, the issue is not just warranty. Nikon USA will not fix your grey market body or lens even though you are willing to pay. That is how they discourage people from buying gray.

    I bought my 200mm/f4 macro gray in the late 1990's because at that time the gray cost was like 60% of the USA version, such that I managed to save several hundred dollars. When I needed the AF/MF ring repair, I sent to APS in Chicago: Borken AF/MF Ring on the 200mm/f4 AF-D Macro
     
  8. The only other lens that I can recall needed repair was the original 24-120. One of the electronic contacts had come loose and I send it to Nikon through the local camera store. When I was quoted almost $170 for the repair, I declined but because of some miscommunication between the camera store and Nikon, the repair was carried out anyway - though I did not have to pay for it. Sold the lens for much less than the repair cost.
     
  9. Shun, as I mentioned, there are other repair shops - such as the one in Chicago that I am not bothering to look up now - that would repair Nikon products. Excellent service. You also mentioned that the chance of sending something for repair is not significant.
    There you go, yes APS is a non-Nikon shop. So there is no need to be tied to the Nikon umbilical cord - though it would be nice. Naturally, I had used Nikon's service as well.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2021 at 11:00 PM
  10. I can't remember how many items I had sent for repair. Even though I am not the most careful user, the number is low. I had definitely sent the 24-70 and the 200-400 too. My 200mm micro lens dropped into water and sent that one to Nikon but they returned it because the repair cost would not be worth it. Maybe there were 1 or 2 forgotten items too. In other words, the warranty does not seem to be the most important thing in the world. ;)

    Oh I need to mention that Nikon "recalled" my D800 at one time. It was quite beaten up and they practically replaced most of the parts and it looked like a new camera. I was very pleased.
     
  11. If I remember correctly, several years ago, Nikon restricted the parts, tools, software, and training independent repair facilities could purchase from Nikon. Aren't you pretty well restricted to Nikon Service for repair of current Nikon equipment?

    LINK: Nikon Shuttering Its Authorized Repair Program | PetaPixel
     

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