Nikon super colscan 9000 ED scanner

Discussion in 'Medium Format' started by aaron said, Nov 25, 2008.

  1. Hi guys,

    Does anyone know if the Nikon super coolscan 9000 ED is able toscan 6X17 films? I am interested in buying the Fuji
    6X17 to make this kind of pictures, but I would like to know if I can scan them with this Nikon scanner.

    Thanks for you comments


    Aaron
     
  2. Try this.....

    http://www.nikonusa.com/Find-Your-Nikon/Product/Film-Scanners/9237/Super-COOLSCAN-9000-ED.html
     
  3. It can't. Although the MF tray can physically accommodate a 6x17 frame, the scanner cannot scan the entire frame in a single pass. You'd have to scan in two segments using the 6x9 setting and stitch them together, making sure to manually specify focus and exposure.
     
  4. Also, I should add that supporting the film will be difficult, though this is true for all medium format negs. The FH-869S has major problems holding film flat. The FH-869G is better, or you can buy glass sheets from fpointinc.com that will fit inside the 869S tray.

    It's a shame, really. The Coolscan 9000 is such an amazing scanner, but it's held back by the stock trays.
     
  5. ... Which can be done without too much trouble.
     
  6. If your computer has lotsa RAM, you can do what Sean describes. You'll need glass for scanning 120 film. I went with spending $78 + shipping from focal point to get a couple of anti-newton sheets, and I modified my standard holder to use them.
     
  7. Nikon sells a glass filmholder that will hold an entire negative or slide of 6x17, but it is quite expensive. As
    already said, the limit is in the scanning software: you have to make two scans and glue them together.

    Actually, I think that Nikon should publish the technical specs of the scanners in order to commumicate with it.
    So we can write our own Open Source programs and adapt it to our own needs. It is unnecessary Nikon keeps these
    protocols secret, it limits the possibilities of the scanner and only frustrates its users to force them closed
    software solutions, with all its drawbacks of limited possibilities, security, unstability and vendor lock-in.
    Ask Nikon to issue the protocol for this scanner. So, you can (ask an informatic to) write a scanner program or
    adapt existing Open Source scanning software Sane. The Sane project is hold for this scanner (the 8000 seems to
    work fine), because of the lack of information concerning the communication protocol, If we, as photogs, will
    insist often to Nikon, hopefully they will change their mind, once.

    Gerber
     
  8. The limit is not the scanning software, but the fine-step stepping motor inside the Nikon. The hardware.<br>It's travel is limited to cover 6x9. Anything more than that needs the coarse-step motor to move the fine-step thingy into a new position.<br>So other software, nor a tweek of Nikon's software, will not do anything to change this.
     
  9. The limit is not the scanning software, but the fine-step stepping motor inside the Nikon. The hardware.<br>It's travel is limited to cover 6x9. Anything more than that needs the coarse-step motor to move the fine-step thingy into a new position.<br>So other software, nor a tweek of Nikon's software, will not do anything to change this.
     
  10. See that my response made the list twice. Ah well... boosts my post count. ;-)
     
  11. Recently I went to my friend house who has a Nikon 9000, the original stock medium format trail can accommodate 2 6x7 or 3 645 frame, which mean I have to cut the film to scan it.
    Not sure about the glass film holder.

    For the 6x17, do you have to cut the film with the glass holder?
     
  12. The Nikon scans 4 frames of 6x4.5, 3 frames of 6x6, 2 frames of 6x7 or 6x9.<br>But that is not all you can do with the machine.<br>The original MF holder holds a strip 20 cm/8" long. The glass carries does the same. So no need to cut the film with either holder.<br>To scan a 6x17 frame, you tell the software to scan two 6x9 images, scan the first one. Then you return to the previews and move the offset so the second frame has overlap with the first one. Scan the second bit, and you're ready to stitch the frames in photoediting software. Works fine.
     
  13. Yes it scans 6x17 and I've done so with transparency film I've shot with a FUJI 617. As mentioned above, it scans it
    into two halves that you have to merge together in Photoshop. You can get beautiful results. Once you get
    comfortable with the process, it's easy. Email me privately if you need some tips. Good luck.

    Kind regards,

    Derek Jecxz

    http://www.jecxz.com
     

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