NIKON D80 1987(ISH) LOGIC AND MIRROR PROBLEM

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by steve_white|16, Aug 11, 2013.

  1. Hi All,
    My first post on this site, so I am hoping you will be able to help me please. I am an enthusiastic amateur who progressed to my first DSLR from 30 years of 35mm (Zenit E, Canon A1 and Pentax D50) to my lovely Nikon D80. I bought it in Australia in 2007 and it has been around the world, working quite hard (10000+ shots.)
    This weekend at the first of 2 weddings, the screen stopped displaying. The 'shutter' sound (mirror lift) was heard like normal but after the display started to remain blank, I subsequently noted not images saved. I then noticed that the menu screen (top right) was displaying information regardless of the camera being switched on or off. Full functionality came back intermittently and then the camera ceased to function. On arrriving home I removed the battery (which was showing about 75% full) and left the camera overnight without the battery in. I charged both the main and my spare battery and in the morning, on reloading the camera, all worked fine.
    Day 2, Wedding 2 (my daughter's) the camera performed beautifully, taking 483 shots and working very well with my Speedlight.
    I got home today and on downloading I noticed some blotches. Obviously some dust. I opened the camera and with a full battery (iaw the instructions) selected mirror lock up successfully. I used my blower to blow through and switched the camera off, thus lowering the mirror as instructed.
    Now, when I switch on, there is an E showing on the menu screen and in the viewfinder a new icon flashing; it is a square with a slant line and up arrow, suggesting mirror up problem.
    In view of the problems shown above I guess the advice I will receive is to send it back to Nikon for them to look at and quote a price.
    My question is: has anyone out there experienced anything similar please and, if so, what did you do about it?
    As with many of us I don't like being without my camera, added to the fact that I have lost my trusty Olympus waterproof camera that I normally carry as a back up. I guess I will have to bite the bullet and post it off to Nikon, but I would really appreciate any views please.
    Many thanks
    Steve W
     
  2. Sorry, me again. I also would like to add that on opening the side flap to the left (USB port etc) I noticed a small 'pin operate' type button. I took the plunge and tried this , hoping it would be like a 'reset' button on a router. Nothing appeared to happen. I also tried pressing the two red 'format' buttons nothing. I still have the icon flashing (square with slant line and 'up' arrow and an E on the menu screen and in the data line in the view finder. Heeeeellllpppp ?
     
  3. The square with the up arrow does not indicate a mirror problem, but it indicates that there is no memory card. The -E- on the LCD indicates the same.
    So, check the SD card, try a different one, see if you can format the card in camera. If multiple SD cards aren't recognised in the camera, it could be the memory slot being defect, but it's a bit more likely to be the problem of a single card; so try another card first.
     
  4. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Also, on the left side of SD memory cards, there is a little switch for locking the card. If that is switched to the lock position, the camera cannot write any new images onto the card and will display an error message. Please verify that your card(s) is not locked.
     
  5. Sounds like more than just memory card issues to me. If so, it's not worth repairing, given the age of the camera. Since you do weddings,
    I assume you have backup gear. If so, what model is your backup camera? Sounds like a great time to upgrade. Maybe a D7100, or even
    a D7000 which are at a great price these days.
     
  6. Thank you all so very much for your swift replies. This weekend has been a bit emotional - my elder daughter's wedding - and when the D80 went down on Friday afternoon, with no time at all to source another camera, I was a bit desperate. My backup is a little Olympus which decided a couple of weeks ago to play hide and seek with me. It is still winning as I have no idea where it is. I guess it will jump out and shout 'Boo!' just before its battery dies.
    Anyway, a big thank you to Wouter Willemse, I just discovered what a twit I am - you are absolutely right - my SD card was sat on the shelf next to me. As Homer Simpson would say ' Dooooh!' Thank you.
    Thank you to Shun Cheung, when I put the card back in I checked the switch as well. Actually the D80 is performing like a new camera at the moment - maybe I will trade it in to a shop before it decides to play up again.
    And Thank you to Devon for your advice too. I went along the Nikon Repair Centre route a while back when my pictures got a bit spotty. After some more valuable advice I bought a 'bulb blower' for £6 and it blew my troubles away.
    I know this is a Nikon page, and I have loved the D80 since I bought it in 07. I reckon around 10000 photo's (could be double that) have been shot with it with some lovely results. Thing is, like all folks, I really don't like unreliability; when something actually lets you down for no apparent reason, it is difficult to truly trust it again. If it turns out I go for an upgrade I know I want a DSLR that does good HD video, has a really good microphone capability and also has a fold-out screen.
    I think I might stick with Nikon for now as I have 2 good lenses and a Speedlight which is lovely. Actually another Nikon Body and I would never have to take a lens off again - saving the risk of spotty pictures.
    Thank you all again, I really appreciate your advice
    Happy shooting
    Steve
     
  7. Glad to hear the D80 is back up and running!
    I want a DSLR that does good HD video, has a really good microphone capability and also has a fold-out screen.​
    The camera that delivers closest to what you want would be the D5200 - though I honestly have no idea about the microphone quality and capabilities. But it's worth looking up that one - it is smaller and more consumer-oriented than the D80 though. If the fold-out screen is just "nice to have", the D7000 or D7100 mentioned are definitely nice steps up from the D80.
    Actually another Nikon Body and I would never have to take a lens off again - saving the risk of spotty pictures.​
    Not really; the idea that dust gets in while changing lenses is partially a myth. I mean: it can happen, but it's certainly not the only way. Zoomlenses push and pull in air as well, and lenses are not dust sealed. So, basically, using zoom you also already risk dust spots. Simply put, sensor cleaning is part of being a DSLR user.
     
  8. Thank you Wouter, as an engineer it should have occurred to me that the air had to go somewhere when a zoom mechanism is operated. I had not even thought of it.
    With regard to an upgrade, I really like the 'heaviness' feel of the D80 (585gm) so I might feel drawn toward the 7000 (695gm) although the D5000 series, weighing in at 510-565 are going to be just right too. I guess it is all down to what I can afford at the time of buying
    I wonder how long it would be before I get bored of carrying 2 cameras around.........
    Regard
    Steve
     
  9. Thank you Wouter, as an engineer it should have occurred to me that the air had to go somewhere when a zoom mechanism is operated. I had not even thought of it.
    With regard to an upgrade, I really like the 'heaviness' feel of the D80 (585gm) so I might feel drawn toward the 7000 (695gm) although the D5000 series, weighing in at 510-565 are going to be just right too. I guess it is all down to what I can afford at the time of buying
    I wonder how long it would be before I get bored of carrying 2 cameras around.........
    Regard
    Steve
     
  10. Thank you Wouter, as an engineer it should have occurred to me that the air had to go somewhere when a zoom mechanism is operated. I had not even thought of it.
    With regard to an upgrade, I really like the 'heaviness' feel of the D80 (585gm) so I might feel drawn toward the 7000 (695gm) although the D5000 series, weighing in at 510-565 are going to be just right too. I guess it is all down to what I can afford at the time of buying
    I wonder how long it would be before I get bored of carrying 2 cameras around.........
    Regard
    Steve
     
  11. Really sorry, not sure why that posted 3 times. I hope the moderators will tidy it.
    Last question: does anyone know what the little button inside the left hand cover (where the USB port is) - it looks like one of those 'reset' buttons you find on an internet router. I pressed this a number of times and I am not sure if it did anything.
     
  12. "...does anyone know what the little button inside the left hand cover (where the USB port is)"
    See excerpts from D80 user manual below...
    00buBZ-541870484.jpg
     
  13. Actually the D80 is performing like a new camera at the moment - maybe I will trade it in to a shop before it decides to play up again.
    You will be offered little for your D80 on trade-in. You may be better off to have it looked over by a repair shop, then use it for back-up until it really dies. My D80 has been problem free for years, and I still use it for more casual photography. Note that the D80 has a penta-prism viewfinder (although not 100%) and two control wheels for camera adjustments. I also have a D7000, and the transition between the two cameras is easy once you gain reasonable familiarity. The D7000 has a 100% penta-prism viewfinder. The D5000 series have only one control wheel, which means camera adjustments are more menu driven. The D5200 has a 95% penta-mirror viewfinder. Typically, penta-prism viewfinders are brighter and better for composition than penta-mirror viewfinders. Additionally, the D7000 (or D7100) will meter with manual focus lenses, such as my Micro-Nikkor 105mm AI. The bottom line: take the time to handle the new cameras, and read up on the specifications. Then comes your cost/benefit analysis.
     
  14. Thank you Christopher. Since playing with the reset button my D80 seems to be behaving. Thanks also for the info on the D5200 and D7000 series, I think I will probably go that way since I have 2 Nikkor Lenses and a Nikon Speedlight SB800.
    Cheers
    Steve
     
  15. Your D80 should last many frames longer. I have over 50K with the shutter rated for 150K actuations. Dust is the biggest enemy of the D80 and the occasional cleaning is worthwhile. When your camera failed the first time is a result of a failing battery. I had a similar situation happen with the original batteries purchased with my body. I had used them heavily for 3+ years and when shooting a family session the camera stopped functioning completely. I was fortunate enough to have shot 90% of the session and pulled out a MF camera and took 10 frames to end the session.

    When I returned home and installed a new battery, everything returned to normal.
     

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