Nikon D7000 AF factory defects

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by bartlomiej_gierczak, Dec 21, 2011.

  1. I live in Poland. There are very common AF problems with D7000. On most popular polish nikon forum (nikoniarze.pl), D7000 focusing problem thread has 476 pages !!
    AF is very random in this camera. Probably the cause is faulty mirror lifting mechanism. Nikon doesn't want to plead, but service replaces mirror mechanism.
    There is a photographer, who tested seven d7000 cameras and none of them was perfect. Problem is very clear when shooting with narrow depth of field - large aperture lenses. Often, the camera is working very well for some time and suddenly begins to focus randomly (backfocus), especially at long distances.
    Do You know the matter ?
    What do You think about that ? Have You replaced mirror mechanism by service ?
    Sorry for my poor english
     
  2. Do you have a D7000? Are you experiencing this problem? If so, send the camera in to Nikon repair; they will fix it for free. If you are just worrying as a potential buyer, then look online at the photos that people are capturing with this camera, and don't worry about it. Online issues get magnified by the vocal few. People aren't signing up for forums to report that their camera is working as advertised.
     
  3. Problem is very clear when shooting with narrow depth of field - large aperture lenses.​
    All AF systems have problems with that. Maybe people are expecting too much of the AF system. There are many people who expect a more expensive camera to make "perfect" photos for them, especially when used with a too expensive lens - they seem to underestimate the role they play as a photographer. And Ariel makes an excellent point how on the internet a few people can cause a lot of noise.
    So if your camera is working just fine (like most do), I wouldn't care. If it has a problem, call Nikon service. If they are performing the repairs now, and afterwards it's fine, Nikon does not need to plea anything. They need to resolve the problem that exist. Which they seem to do.
     
  4. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    I only have one D7000, which I bought as soon as they went onto the market in November, 2010. I have used it extensively and taken it to Central and South America twice in the last year (Costa Rica and Ecuador/Gelapagos). I find its AF excellent and almost as good as the D300/D700/D3. Today, the D7000 is my primary DX-format body over my D300.
    The D7000 is extremely popular. If it has a lot of problems, I would imagine that a lot of people would be sending them back to Nikon for warranty repair. While Nikon produces D7000 in large numbers at a factory in Thailand where labor cost is low, warranty repair is individual and labor is costly. If Nikon needs to make a lot of warranty repairs, they would be losing money big time.
    I tend to agree with Thom Hogan that a lot of the so called D7000 "problems" are due to user errors. To some degree the same thing happens to every popular camera such as the D300, etc.
     
  5. There are no factory defects, as stated by the poster.
    Not in Poland or enywhere else.
    Bartlomiej, you are new to photo.net, Welcome!
    Photo.net is not a nikoniarze, and unfounded accusations will not be received well here.
    Go ahead and argue there, on the nikoniarze.pl.
    There may be some large number of comments there, and most of comments are positive. If there are 476 pages of comments ?, then perhaps only a small % of it has some merit, resultant of things already explained.
    Most of people there argue about opinions and had never seen the D7000 camera.
    The nikoniarze.pl is not worth your time, but if you want to use the Google translate, go and see there:
    http://forum.nikoniarze.pl/showthread.php?t=197073
    http://forum.nikoniarze.pl/showthread.php?t=176224
     
  6. Problem is very clear when shooting with narrow depth of field - large aperture lenses.​
    Welcome, your english is just fine!
    The problem with focus errors in this particular instance are normally, in my estimation, photographers not understanding how optics work.
    "Help, my lens is not sharp wide open!" Nope, and it never will be. A subject who's not facing you directly will always have one eye out of focus when not head on, for instance.
    It used to be that when people used SLRs they learned about how they worked and how the principles of physics with regard to their optics worked. Now, they complain for pages and pages on blogs.
     
  7. It's true. People with their first step-up from a point-and-shoot camera enjoy reasonable results. Then they see that they want to shoot in low light or want to be able to get nice bokeh etc and buy a fast prime, and try using it wide open. And they have no idea that the DoF in many cases is just a couple of centimeters. If their subject (or the camera) moves even a bit while composing/shooting, the focal plane will be in an unexpected spot. It's very easy to do with human-caused errors, especially in dim situations.

    I sense that thousands of relatively inexperienced people with bodies like this and fast lenses just don't understand what's actually going on.
     
  8. I'm an owner of d7000. I don't have a fast lens now - I've sold my old analog stuff. Now I have nikkor 16-85. My nikon works fine so far, but I'm afraid that AF will brake someday. I have a lot of experience with fast lenses.
    Problems were reported not only in Poland - all over the world, but only in Poland I found that the nikon service replaces a mirror mechanism (notabene it also causes oil stains on matrix).
    Even on this forum - http://www.photo.net/nikon-camera-forum/00XnSk?start=0.
    It seems that problem is quite frequent - many users, especially who has kit lenses, are not aware of it.
    You must filter all forum information. I take into account only information from experienced users. Many of them are professional photographers and can compare pictures taken with D7000 and D300 with the same lens.
    The worst thing is that AF in a lot of d7000's begins malfunctioning after, eg 15000 shots.
     
  9. Your AF doesn't break. It's either calibrated well, or it isn't. It will continue working exactly the same, until the day that your camera dies or you do something to damage it, such as spilling water inside, or dropping it off a building, etc. Backfocus and frontfocus is not a problem of the D7000. It is a natural shortcoming of phase-detect autofocus systems. Read these articles:
    http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2008/12/this-lens-is-soft-and-other-myths
    http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2010/03/this-lens-is-soft-and-other-facts
    Again, it is not a problem of the D7000. As Shun, Frank, Peter, and Matt have already stated, it is a problem with people not understanding the equipment they are using. They think that if they buy a more expensive camera, their photos will be better, when in fact their images will be worse, because of the complexity. Anyone could go to a local store and buy a $200 bike, and learn to ride it without issues. A $13,000 racing bike used in the Tour de France is much more complex and HARDER to use, not easier. Same thing with cameras. 99% of the people with D7000 issues are actually people that bought more camera than they understand or are able to handle. Please go back and slowly read all of the comments again, because they have all already answered your fears completely accurately.
     
  10. You don't understand me. BF/FF isn't any problem for me and for most experienced users (in reasonable limits of course) as far as it is constant, fixed. AF microadjustment can fix this. The problem with D7000 is that AF suddenly begins to work randomly ! One shot ok, another shot huge BF. At long distances to the target, BF is usually greater than range of microadjustment and very variable. First nikon service calibrated faulty cameras, with no success. Now replaces mirror lifting mechanism, and after this operation owners of d7000 are satisfied wih work of AF.
    Please, believe that this problem is real, I don't have time and willingness to prove this, many clever and wise people wrote thousands comments about it, in many different countries. We only don't know what scale it is
    I wanted to know if case is known to You, especially replacing mirror mechanism.
    Oh - ps: this link You gave is known for me for long time and it was discussed on nikoniarze.pl year ago
    (http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2010/03/this-lens-is-soft-and-other-facts)
     
  11. @Bartlomiej - what exactly are you hoping for? People here do not agree that there is a AF problem with the D7000 nor do they think it is something that you need to worry about. Every new camera goes through the same issue. The D90 had a small and very vocal group of people complaining about it. Some people just like to complain.
    Since you are certain that this problem is real, then sell your D7000 and buy something else. Fortunately for you, the resale value will be high since the D7000 is a great camera.
     
  12. Well well ! After taking picture of my daugther last week, and not being able to get a clear focus on the eye, I did a very simple test, I lined up 5 smalls boxs (food packaging) next to each other, each is further away from the previous by 1 inche. Then I shot 5 pictures with the 5 sensors from left to right (configured 11 sensor, not 39) camera on tripod , speed 1/500 aperture f1.8 to f2.8, lense 85mm 1.8d ( I usually shoot portrait around f2.8)
    The result is that the box on the sensor is not in focus but the one next to it on the right side and 1 inch further away is in focus, and the process reapeat itselef for every sensor. It is alwas the next box that is in focus. With a focus correction of -20, It still focus further away than target.

    My D7000 was back focusing and I had better picture with my D40, and for a dslr that I paid 1100$ it is not acceptable.

    I was the owner of many nikon slr for the last 25 years, including, N50, N80 D40 D40X d90 D7000
    I shoot picture almost every day and I know how focusing work,
    I now shot with a D300s that I got after returning the D7000 and it focus perfectly, and no softness in the images.
    I will stick with the D300s for a while, the images comming out of it are really beautyfull with no artifact and crisp details. I went back with no regrets.
     
  13. So, rather than send your d7000 to Nikon for calibration, you returned it and bought an older design ? Interesting. I was looking to buy the D300, but I opted for the D7000 for cost reasons. If after I purchased it I found it was faulty, I would have exchanged it for another body or sent it in for repair. The reasons I purchased it didn't change, so why should I spend more money to the D300 after an issue ?
    As far as the original posters comments, I suppose it IS possible that the batch of D7000s sent to that region had a faulty part. As long as Nikon fixes it under warranty, I don't see a problem, other than a reputation black eye.
     
  14. Majority of faulty cameras with serial number below 62.... Some People from my country bought their faulty d7000's in Germany, UK and Canada.
    And why Nikon service began replacing mirror mechanism in nearly every AF issue and also oil stains on matrix issues ?
     
  15. Bartlomiej, what do you want to hear? Nikon is fixing broken cameras - good. What is the problem? Your camera works fine today. And you have proof from owners that when it isn't fine, Nikon fixes it. So, what else should they do, according to you?
    I really fail to see a problem here.
     
  16. Anecdotal evidence only shows that it has happened to some people. It does not indicate frequency or severity.
    Also, in my experience, with many users, it seems that they are fine with the kit lens, then they get a wide aperture lens, shoot it wide open, read on the internet where somebody had an AF problem with that camera, and assume that that must be the problem... then they write a post on photo.net and perpetuate misinformation.
    it is certainly possible that there are some people with issues with their D7000... but it's also possible that it's not widespread. Get the camera serviced if need be and move on. All electronic equipment has a failure rate.
     
  17. I have 40 000 shots at d 7000 since september, sigma 17 50 2,8 lens. Still All OK, that is Slow lens and i know how to work, some people just CLIC, and see out of focus. I am beginner and my manager just make training how to work. Now evry pics is FINE
     
  18. Bartlomiej, what do you want to hear? Nikon is fixing broken cameras - good. What is the problem? Your camera works fine today. And you have proof from owners that when it isn't fine, Nikon fixes it. So, what else should they do, according to you?​
    Hmmm... good point. I may exaggerate, but I'm afraid that AF in my Nikon will brake after warranty expires.
    Also, in my experience, with many users, it seems that they are fine with the kit lens, then they get a wide aperture lens, shoot it wide open, read on the internet where somebody had an AF problem with that camera, and assume that that must be the problem... then they write a post on photo.net and perpetuate misinformation.​
    This experience (above) has nothing in common to the case. I wrote, that I can filter information from forums...
    Anecdotal evidence only shows that it has happened to some people. It does not indicate frequency or severity.​
    Anecdotal ? One proffesional photographer tested seven D7000 cameras - none of them were ok, but it was year ago and they were with very early serial numbers. Another bought 3 d7000 cameras in UK and returned to the seller than bought d300. I know more than 20 proved cases of faulty AF and much more likely but not certain. People are satisfied when service replace mirror mechanism or when they return d7000 and buy d300.
     
  19. I was about to ask Santa for a D7000, but the many reported back focusing problems had stopped me in the track.
    http://www.photo.net/nikon-camera-forum/00XnSk
    Not sure if OP was referring to this.
    The reported back focusing problem may be due to design or manufacturing defects, or sample defects, or firmware version difference, or the photographers' incompetence, or is yet another urban legend. Since almost all the reports and rebuttals are from those owning only a single D7000, it is difficult to tell. But Nikon, Adorama and B&H, etc. can certainly shed some light on this. Their representatives must be well aware of this, and some of them are PN members.
     
  20. When there's a lot of a certain product, there are sure to be problems. When I've heard about problems with most cameras over the past few years, it seems far more people are having no problems. That seems to be what is happening in this case, too.
    How long has this camera been out and I'm just hearing about these problems now in this thread?
     
  21. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    yet another urban legend​
    IMO, most of this is urban legend. While I have only one D7000 and have used a friend's, my D7000 is my 6th Nikon DSLR and I have tested many other samples, including a 2nd D300, D300S, D3 (two samples), D3X, D3S, D3000, and D5000. Most recently I tested a J1. And prior to digital, I had four Nikon AF film SLRs including the N8008, F4, F5, and F100. None of them has any defect at all. Obviously the test sample were shipped from Nikon directly, but the SLRs I bought were all off-the-shelf random samples.
    Among those camera, the only two problems I have had so far are:
    1. The electronics in the F4 failed after about 8, 9 years. Today, it no longer switches on.
    2. The depth-of-field preview button on the F100 malfunctioned after about 3 years. Today, the preview is no longer usable.
    Interestingly, those two are higher-end bodies. None of my 6 DSLRs has experienced any problems so far, dating back to the D100 I bought in 2002, almost 10 years ago.
    Yet, for just about every recent Nikon DSLR, there is some sorts of urgan legend that many of them are defective. E.g. the following thread is of a similar nature for the D300: http://www.photo.net/nikon-camera-forum/00SCGt
    There are a few Nikon models that have massive problems such as the D70 BGLOD and the D5000's circuit board problem. Once those issues are confirmed, typically Nikon responses quickly and provides free repairs. For example, as soon as the D5000 was released, I got a test sample and the wide-spread circuit-board issue was also discovered almost immediately. By the time I finished up the review a couple of month later, Nikon had already set up a system to repair those D5000 and I even provided a link about the recall inside the review: http://www.photo.net/equipment/nikon/D5000/review/
    Otherwise, something like a 5% defect rate is fairly typical for electronics such as DSLRs. If it is much higher than that, all the warranty repair cost will really hurt Nikon.
     
  22. I saw a guy on another site that posted "the purpose of a dslr is to auto-focus", and a second who screamed "what's wrong with my D7000, it only focuses perfectly 99% of the time!" Jeez, with folks like that running around its no wonder people think the D7000 has auto-focusing issues. So many variables can give a newbie the impression something is wrong that its almost impossible to say if there really is a problem or not. All I know for sure is that my D7000 focuses perfectly 86% of the time as expected.
     
  23. "I know more than 20 proved cases of faulty AF and much more likely but not certain." Considering that these are mass produced (probably in the hundreds of thousands I would imagine), 20 seems like an insignificant amount (I know those experiencing problems are not happy but I think everyone knows even Nikon can't get it right 100% of the time - that is why they offer a comprehensive warranty).
    My D7000 gets the focus right 100% of the time (but I do mess up on occasion). The D7000 is truly an incredible camera and exceptional value - a true bargain considering what it costs and what you get!
     
  24. Many of those "problems" probably come from poor focusing techniques. Even the best auto-focus systems are not entirely perfect, but the Nikon ones are some of the best, in my experience.
     
  25. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    I don't have sales numbers for the D7000, but when Nikon introduced the D300 back in 2007, they were producing 80K units a month running three shifts at their Thailand factory; after a couple of months, they increated that to 90K a month. While I am sure that number would slow down later on, I would say there were probably 1 millioin D300 in circulation after a year.
    Now that the D7000 is a little over a year old and since it is a cheaper DSLR (and therefore higher sales than the D300), there should be no doubt that there are well over 1M unit around. Given a typical 5% defective rate, I would assume that there are 50K defective D7000 produced, at least as a rough, ball-park figure. So if you only listen to those people who have problems with their D7000, you can easily find a lot of them.
     
  26. I bought my Nikon D7000 on the first day available. I use, or have used on it the Nikon 12-24. 10-24, 14-24, 16-85 (VR), 70-300 (VR), f4 300, 105 (VR), 17-35, 16-35, and most recently, the 85 f1.4G. Not one produced any sort of back focus or front focus that wasn't my fault. This camera, unfortunately, was marketed as both a novice and advanced camera. There are literally more ways to screw up focusing than I can mention, much less explain how to avoid them. I believe this duality accounts for a huge percentage of complaints. The few that are legit can be fixed by Nikon at no cost. If running out of warranty bothers you, purchase an extended warranty.
    If this is not a solution, buy another brand! (and see where THAT gets you)
    Please re-read. http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2010/03/this-lens-is-soft-and-other-facts
    I hate these type of posts!
     
  27. John,
    I dont believe that calibration would have change much, I think there is a desing flaw in the D7000 it is only an opinion, I may be wrong, but this is how I feel about it. The D300s older design is much stronger in buil quality, plus more resistant to elements. Of course I went from, 16Mp to 13Mp, but I find the D300s to be flawless, the auto focus is faster than the D7000, picture quality is very close to the D7000 up to iso 3200, but, the most important factor for me is trust. I was not trusting the D7000 enought to keep it. As for the price, the D300s is only 200$ more. I was also frustrated to have to send back a dslr that I just purchase and have to wait for 3 weeks for it to return.
     
  28. I'm new here and decided to read this thread to better understand the sorts of questions and answers are posted.
    My own personal experience in photography goes back to 1960 and in primary school. Its only been since when I bought an F4 that I experienced auto focus. So I was used to fine manual focus adjustments and manually opening up a stop for more dof. In the film days you had to do it like that because you often had to wait weeks to see your results. At least in Finland where I live.
    The first DSLR I bought was a D300 which I use for wildlife and a D700 for landscapes, portraits etc. I have friends who have D7000's and neither I not they seem to have a problem with any of our cameras. They also spent half their years like me in the manual film era. Maybe all this is unrealistic expectations?
    I will make one comment though, and that is this: I have used my friends D7000 quite a bit and apart from perhaps a later generation sensor, it does not AF quite as well for me as the D300. Its just a subjective observation. I was always thrilled with the speed of the D300. I see it as a D700 with a smaller sensor, which it in fact is. To me both cameras are jewels. The D7000 is good, but to me the D7000's position in the DSLR hierarchy is below the D300 in build quality and its reflected in the price.
    My suggestion to those with AF difficulty is to pass on what works best for me. And anyone who had the pleasure in their past of feeling the strong torque effect of the internal AF motor in an F4, was to learn to use the center focus point really well, because thats all you had. Either that or go to the big white rectangle and let the camera do its best. Surprisingly for me, this latter method is remarkably effective. I always have difficulty in between these extremes....how many sensors?...Dynamic or not?...AF lock on?... Thats all too complicated. My absolutely favorite lens is manual anyway: the 80-200 F4 Ais. You need good manual fine tuning for portraits and landscapes anyway. AF is only needed for wildlife or sports, and sports is really hard with any camera.
    So again: technique or unrealistic expectations in a lot of cases.
    If anyone is coming to Finland, I will take them into the lakes and they can practice shooting ducks with an FM2n and a 3.5 manual telephoto so they can learn how to do it properly.
     
  29. Niko,
    I totaly agree with you. The D7000 is a prosumer product. The sensor and functions of the camera, are realy impressive, but it does not perform, in genera,l as well as a D300, D300s.
    This is the conclusion I came to after 10 days of testing and frustration. Taking a simple portrait, in good light, should be a very simple thing for a camera with the specification of a D7000, It wasnt the case with my copy.
    So, I decided to go another path, I bought a D300s, not for it's high technical specification, witch are almost obsolete by today standard, but, for it's general quality , in built, images sharpness and color, handling, auto focus speed and reliability. In the end, it's not the megapixels or picture controls or 39 focus point or, or, or... that make a difference, it's the final result, when everything is said and done, how does the picture look like.
    I have been in photography for a very long time and the D300 have a prouven track record as a solid performer and this is what I expect for the amount of money that Nikon ask for the privilege of being a Nikon owner. :)
     
  30. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    I have been in photography for a very long time and the D300 have a prouven track record as a solid performer and this is what I expect for the amount of money that Nikon ask for the privilege of being a Nikon owner. :)
    Eric, if you do a little search, you'll find plenty of threads concerning various "problems" for the D300, equivalent to this one on the D7000; people frequently cite various "urgan legend" they read on the web. If anything, there are more such D300 threads than D7000 due to the simple fact that the D300 has been around for a lot longer:
    And the list goes on and on. If you believe in those, you'll wonder about the D300's proven track record.
    I bought my D300 in November 2007 and my D7000 in November 2010. In both cases I got them almost as soon as they were available. I compared their AF capability last year and found only a small difference between the two. The main issue is that I miss the extra 6 cross-type AF point on the D300 (15 vs. 9). Since I shoot a fair amont of sports and wildlife, the slower memory write speed on the D7000 is very noticable and can be an issue if you a lot of successive frames.
    Eventually I decided on the D7000 as my primary DX body due to its improved high-ISO capability. With the D7000, I am comfortable at ISO 800 and sometimes 1600, which is a big plus for wildlife photography. The D300/D300S can get quite noisy at ISO 800 if the lighting is not good, which is typically the case when I need ISO 800 or higher. The 1080p video capability from the D7000 is merely an extra bonus.
    A few months ago I posted this owl image I captured at the Galapagos. I was glad that I had the D7000 with me; @ ISO 3200, the noise is not great but acceptable. The noise would have been ugly had I used the D300. The owl is a nocturnal animal; therefore, you typically photograph them under dim light. Notice that AF is spot on when I needed to use ISO 3200.
    I still own my D300, but it is now my backup DX camera.
    [​IMG]
    Nikon D7000 with 200-400mm/f4 @ 400mm, f4, 1/160 sec and ISO 3200.
     
  31. From my own experience -- and backed up by very good authority -- there is clearly a problem with the way in which D7000 autofocus works under warm color temperatures and in particular incandescent light. Under 2500K to 3000K light, you're looking at a consistent -12 adjustment with f2.8 lenses and about a -8 with f3.5. Under daylight, there is no problem that I can see, but the D7000's response to incandescent with autofocus is a serious problem that should have been attended to by Nikon a long time ago.
     
  32. I'm not sure how people can so confidently state that D7000 A/F issues as reported by some are due to user error. If your D7000 focuses correctly I totally believe you and I'm happy for you. Using A/F is not complicated. I bought a D7000 two weeks ago, and eventually returned it today after struggling with back-focusing issues. I had to adjust the A/F fine tuning endlessly to get acceptable results in various light conditions. All my lenses are acceptably sharp on other Nikon bodies, but all 4 needed "fine tuning" on this camera. Even with fine tuning, the A/F doesn't consistently focus correctly. I ended up using manual focus for most shots. Very disappointed in Nikon - I've been a Nikon D-SLR enthusiast for many years. Back to my D90.
     
  33. Didn't I tell You? The problem is real
     
  34. I'm beginning to feel repetitive in posts like this one. Both of my F7000s had auto focus problems and one had an exposure problem. I don't believe in micro adjustment unless a lens is the problem and my lenses have already proven their focus accuracy on other Nikon bodies. I took both bodies to Nikon Torrance for repair. Both came back operating properly. I did provide Nikon with images taken with the D7000s illustrating the problems. Nikon really appreciates that.
     
  35. I got a D300s and could not be happier.
    Case close as far as I am concern.
    Happy hollyday to all !
     
  36. Bartlomieg,
    Your original questions were:
    "Do You know the matter ?
    What do You think about that ? Have You replaced mirror mechanism by service ?"
    For the most part, we did not know about it, because it just didn't show up much, and because it wasn't a problem , we didn't make Nikon replace our mirror mechanism.
    The point that most have made is, if Nikon fixes the issue, when it is sent in, then they are doing their part. I don't know if this issue is more prevalent than any other issue that camera makers have. If it WAS a big issue, then we wouldn't need a single poster to let us know about it. The professionals would be posting about it and there would be a recall.
     
  37. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    When people say using AF is not complicated, there is where the problem is. The Multi-CAM 3500 AF system (on the D300, D300S, D700, and all D3s) and Multi-CAM 4800 AF system on the D7000 are complicated. I have been using AF almost from the beginning, starting with my N8008 in 1989. And yet, back in 2007, I found the AF system on the D3/D300 very different from the D2X I was accustomed to at the time. It took a lot of trial and error with different settings to figure out what work for me.
    Back then, besides my own D300, Nikon also sent us a separate D300 body and then a D3 body. So I had three cameras all using the Multi-CAM 3500 to work with. For example, 51-point with 3D tracking is pretty much useless to me. Face-detect AF was primitive back in 2007 even on the high-end D3. Today, face-detect AF is excellent on the much cheaper J1 as long as the face is facing the camera from the front; from the side, it is not so good.
    If you look around there have been all sorts of complaints about the D300's AF also. If you want a camera with very few complaints, try the D3X, not because it is any better (I tested one for photo.net), but since it is a $8000 camera, very few people own one so that internet discussion on that model is quite limited compared to the affordable ones.
     
  38. When people say using AF is not complicated, there is where the problem is. The Multi-CAM 3500 AF system (on the D300, D300S, D700, and all D3s) and Multi-CAM 4800 AF system on the D7000 are complicated.
    ...
    It took a lot of trial and error with different settings to figure out what work for me.​
    And for even the most experienced owners of many Nikon gear who can tell the failure of AF in their images. Some (many?) never figure the settings out, because the many permutations of the settings make it nearly impossible for trial and error. The less experienced, the first time owners, and the less critical probably never realize that AF is not working as supposed to.
    Nikon could have done all these owners a great favor by:
    - Explain in detail how the Multi-CAM system work, and how they differ in each body.
    - Provide recipe like suggestions for AF settings for some common shooting situations, such as centered vs off center focus point, decoupling exposure metering from focusing, static vs moving subjects, subject moving across vs back and front, etc. Explain WHY each element in the settings matter. These will lay the foundation for the shooters to experiment with.
    In the much simpler film days, Nikon provided excellent brochures (yes, in PRINT) such as the Challenge and New Creative Techniques series. Now with the much more complex digital, this kind of information is non-existent from Nikon, in print or online. It makes no sense. Well, perhaps there is a good reason - Nikon may think that detailed explanation of these complex AF systems may scare the less experienced potential customers away.
    This leaves room for someone like Thom to bridge the gap. But not everyone reads Thom, nor can we rely upon him to be right all the time.
    http://luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/nikon-focus.shtml
    http://bythom.com/autofocus.htm
     
  39. What firmware are those who experience the problem using? There have been two updates since the released of the
    camera. I have not had similar problems that I can attribute to the camera. However, there are times that my D7000 will
    focus somewhere other than I want it to. In those cases I just reframe, refocus and move on. The camera has such a wide
    range of capabilities that it does increase the opportunity for user error. I've pushed about 10,000 images through the
    camera and consider myself about 80% of where I'd like to be interns of using the camera without till haing to think about
    each step. Ad cameras become moe sophisticated and complex the learning curve becomes steeper and the process
    takes longer.
     
  40. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    As I said, I bought my D7000 almost as soon as it came out last year. (I did the same with the D300 4 years ago.) I had the original version 1.00 firmward for about a year. Only recently I upgraded to A 1.02 and B 1.03. Firmware is definitely not the issue. Age of the camera shouldn't be either; my D7000 has over 20K actuations now.
    The fact of the matter is that moden electronics are complicated. I have two graduate degrees in computer science, but when I bought my first DSLR the D100 back in 2002, it looks me months to learn digital and post processing. Even today, I only a small fraction of the features in PhotoShop; I know enough to print good images, but there is lot more out there that I don't know.
    Therefore, if one doesn't have the time to spend on learning complex digital cameras, they are better off getting a point and shoot. Even the J1 is pretty complex once you go inside the menus.
     
  41. Shun: You are right on the mark about the complexity of the system -- it isn't any single component either -- it is a system from lens through camera to media to processor and software. I'm reminded of moving up to high performance aircraft after flying for several years. The flying was the same, but the systems management and time frame to do it in were much more demanding. The same is true with each new generation of camera. The D7000 seems to me to be a generational jump from my D70 and thinking back to my D1, it looks like a fossil now. Moving to CS5 at about the same time and having 16GB of RAM and seemingly endless memory opens doors that I never thought of before. It is all that learning and working with the new capabilities (and failing time and again along the way) that is exciting.
     
  42. I bought a USA Nikon D7000 at a Los Angeles-area Best Buy immediately after its release, SN: 30029XX. A couple months ago, I bought an AF-S Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8G and found that the lens appeared to unpredictably back-focus. Test after test, shooting wide-open, using a high-contrast target (a lock-off shot of an Apple keyboard) and the center focus-point, definitely showed something was amiss (e.g., focus on the 'T' key, but the 'V' key was the only letter sharp). I also thought that the D7000 "AF problem" was mere internet lore, until I had the problem myself. AF-tune didn't help, since the behavior was inconsistent. Often, the lens wouldn't auto-focus at all until a re-mount/re-boot. I returned that lens and bought another 17-55mm Nikkor from Samy's Camera in LA. There's no focus problem, but every once in a while, the AF is dead, requiring a re-mount/re-boot. This problem only occured with these two lenses. Up until I bought the 17-55mm, AF was spot-on with this body when using the AF 35mm f/2.0D, AF 50mm f/1.4D/G, AF 105mm f/2.0D, AF 180mm f/2.8D, AF-S 70-200mm f/2.8 VR I, etc.
     
  43. Settings for above:
    Firmware v1.02
    Focus mode: single-point
    Focus point: center, cross-type
    Number of focus points: AF39
    Focus-tracking: off
     
  44. My point was both to contribute an additional report to the mix, as well as to field others' hypotheses on the matter. Could the D7000's "AF problem" be caused by particular body-lens combinations? Some odd quirk between the D7000's, and lens CPU's firmware and/or electrical tolerances for example,?
     
  45. There is no issue regarding AF system. I own a Nikon D7000 for more than a year, and after thousands of pics I realized that AF systems are mainly human errors. Seriously!
     
  46. I have used the D90 for a couple of years then I decided to get the D7000. I had no problems with the AF on the D90. If my shots were out of focus with the D90, yes it was my fault and I was able to make in field corrections. I have taken well over 60,000 shots with the D90 with the vast majority of the shots were tack sharp. The D7000 now thats a different beast, I have had nothing but AF problems right from the start. Those persons who own a D7000 and report no problems, thats great I am happy for you, but please do not attempt to boost your ego by telling yourself and others that all of the D7000 owners who have AF problems do not know what they are doing. Seriously!
     
  47. I am so amused by this tread Lol ! Lol ! and re Lol!
    The toyota owners that crash their cars a couple of years ago , probably did not know how to drive and it was probably their fault....
    Again, Lol !
     
  48. i've done exhaustive testing and still been burned by randomness on this issue. I'll send mine in
    if they really take them.
     
  49. The toyota owners that crash their cars a couple of years ago , probably did not know how to drive and it was probably their fault....​
    That's what the Nikon cheerleaders (who have no first hand experience of the D7000 problems reported here) want everyone to believe.
     
  50. The toyota owners that crash their cars a couple of years ago , probably did not know how to drive and it was probably their fault....​
    Did you ever actually follow up on that story? I didn't think so.
     
  51. Mr Laur
    1- 0 for you !
     
  52. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Interesting link, Matt. I am old enough to remember the Audi "sudden acceleration problem" 20+ years ago. Back then, a close friend of mind had an Audi and he was sure that there was no problem with his car at all.
    In particular, the last two paragraphs in the Car and Driver article Matt links to caught my eye:
    Audi didn’t help itself by blaming the crashes on the cars’ owners, who didn’t appreciate the suggestion that they were incompetent drivers. Toyota avoided that approach last year.
    Like Toyota, Audi was also largely exonerated by a DOT report, published in March 1989. But by that time, however, the damage was done. Audi’s U.S. sales plummeted from 74,061 in 1985 to 12,283 in 1991.​
    It is human nature to blame someone else first. That is why it is always Audi, Toyota, and Nikon's fault.
    Nobody is suggesting that every single D7000 ever manufactured by Nikon is perfect. It is completely normal that a few percent of DSLRs, be it the D7000, D300, or D3, to be defective. However, I don't think there is any wide-spread AF issues on the D7000, nor the D300 as quite a few threads on this forum suggest. My D7000 works perfectly and I think it is a major bargain for $1199. There is absolutely no reason that yours is not. If you fully understand how the D7000's AF works and still have doubts about your camera, by all means send it back to Nikon for adjustment.
    Another issue to keep in mind is that the D7000 is far more demanding on lenses. As I have mentioned several times before, my 500mm/f4 AF-S works great on the F5 before and nowadays on the D300 and D700. However, on the D7000, it is simply not as sharp. I have tesed that carefully in live view mode; even though I fine tune the focus manually with the aid of a greatly magnified image on the back LCD, the D7000 out-resolves that lens at f4. That is not an AF issue as I didn't even use AF for the test. That is going to be a bigger and bigger problem as we move to higher pixel-densities.
     
  53. I picked up a D7000 yesterday (last one in town) and am having the focus problems that others seem to be reporting. Previously I've used Nikon FE, F801, D50, and have been shooting with SLR's for 30 years. I'm extremely impressed by everything about the D7000 except the focus.
    I took a few shots of my son shortly after getting it, and was surprised to see him out of focus, no question the focus was on his face in all pictures. This was in the default AF-A mode, using an 18-70mm DX lens.
    So, I sat with the manual, put it in single-point mode, and took some pictures of a focus chart at a 45 degree angle with the 18-70, using both the D50 and D7000 (tripod mounted, flash illuminated). In that test, both showed significant back focus with the 18-70. I used an older 50mm/1.8 AF with better results, and a 70-210/4-5.6D which showed no backfocus.
    So, I sat my daughter down and took photos with both bodies using the 18-70 at 70 mm, focusing on her braces. The D50 was a bit soft, but not anything that would have caught my attention - likely just the default settings. The D7000 was quite out of focus in an identical situation. I tried the D7000 in live-view: big improvement. Then I tried AF fine tuning on, and -20, -15, -10, -5 were all perfect - dazzling in their detail actually. I'm surprised they all look identical, but I checked the exif data, and those were the settings. When I set to 0 with fine tune on, it was still blurry, but not as bad as when fine tune was off.
    Now I'm trying to figure out what to do. Is this expected behavior? Should the camera be returned? I've only had it for a day, but I know I can't find a replacement in town.
     
  54. Nobody is suggesting that every single D7000 ever manufactured by Nikon is perfect. It is completely normal that a few percent of DSLRs, be it the D7000, D300, or D3, to be defective. However, I don't think there is any wide-spread AF issues on the D7000, nor the D300 as quite a few threads on this forum suggest.​
    Why are You so sure that only a few percent is defected ? Do You have any proof for it ? How many d7000's have you tested ?
    Another issue to keep in mind is that the D7000 is far more demanding on lenses. As I have mentioned several times before, my 500mm/f4 AF-S works great on the F5 before and nowadays on the D300 and D700. However, on the D7000, it is simply not as sharp. I have tesed that carefully in live view mode; even though I fine tune the focus manually with the aid of a greatly magnified image on the back LCD, the D7000 out-resolves that lens at f4.​
    We talk about random and huge BF/FF(rather BF), when there is a part of a particular image sharp enough, but it isn't the target. We don't talk about lack of sharpness on a whole frame. It is obvious that d7000 is more demanding on lenses.
    And now for Eric
    I used an older 50mm/1.8 AF with better results, and a 70-210/4-5.6D which showed no backfocus.
    Now I'm trying to figure out what to do. Is this expected behavior? Should the camera be returned? I've only had it for a day, but I know I can't find a replacement in town.​
    In my opinion Your d7000 is okay - the nikkor 17-80 is defected. You should calibrate the lens with the d7000 body - send both to service.
     
  55. I just got a call from the friend of mine to whom I sold my D7000 a few months ago. He had taken the camera in for complimentary sensor cleaning (offered in the original purchase; warranties are transferable in Finland) and what happened is that the service replaced the mirror mechanism and some other parts (without being asked about it) under warranty. Some of you will recall that I owned the D7000 for about eight months and had difficulty in autofocusing with fast lenses so that the rate of successful focus was as low as 10% with some lenses (the 200/2 notably) while being better but still required stopping down to f/2.8 with the 70-200 II, something that I didn't have to do with my D700, D3 and now D3X. I sold the D7000 because these difficulties meant the camera was too unreliable for me to use as a general purpose tool (excelling in landscape details and macro mostly)as I often photograph with wide apertures (f/1.4 to f/2.8). I really liked the sensor though. Now I regret selling the camera a little but since Nikon didn't send any word about this problem to users (at least not by September) I was unaware that it was a manufacturing / quality control issue. I assumed that the problem was just due to the camera being intended to a more consumer market and not users of very fast lenses. That assumption turned out to be incorrect.
    But my friend got it inexpensively and this I am happy about and the fact that he got it fixed. I'm sure he will be very happy with it. ;-)
    By the way the forum response to this topic has been appalling, and not just in this thread.
     
  56. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Why are You so sure that only a few percent is defected ? Do You have any proof for it ? How many d7000's have you tested ?​
    Bartlomiej, exactly when and where did I say that I was sure about only a few percent of D7000 are defective?
    I have used two D7000 samples. How many have you used?
    To Eric Maniloff, if your experience with SLRs is with the FE, F801 (N8008) and D50, you haven't used anything as complex as the D7000. I do have an unfair advantage as I have tested all six Nikon DSLR models that use the Multi-CAM 3500 with 51 AF points, and I own two of the six (D300 and D700). The Multi-CAM 4800 on the D7000 is like a slightly watered-down version with a lot of similarities. In other words, the time I spent learning the Multi-CAM 3500 when I tested the D300 and D3 back in 2007/2008 makes it much easier for me to use the D7000.
    To see how accurate your D7000's AF is, I would suggest getting off the default AF-A mode. Try single servo AF-S. Set your Custom Setting a2 (AF-S Priority) to focus priority so that the camera will not capture an image unless it thinks the subject is in focus. Among the D7000's 39 AF points, only the center 9 are of cross type (i.e. the 9 in the center of the frame in a 3x3 matrix). I would stick with those 9 as they would give you the fastest and most accurate AF results.
    While the many Custom Settings on Nikon DSLRs seems complicated, as starters, I would set a1 and a2 first. Those are the focus priorities settings for the Continuous (AF-C) and Single Servo (AF-S) modes.
    00ZnZr-428815584.jpg
     
  57. But my friend got it inexpensively and this I am happy about and the fact that he got it fixed. I'm sure he will be very happy with it. ;-)​
    There could be a few reasons why Nikon replaced the D7000 parts.
    - Nikon recognizes the problem in the units sold in Iceland, and takes measure there.
    - The particular Nikon tech recognized the problem in that particular D7000, and took measure.
    In either case, your friend was very lucky. And are the Iceland Nikon owners?
    By the way the forum response to this topic has been appalling, and not just in this thread.​
    Which response did you find appalling? Those who reported the problem, or those who refused to accept the reports?
    One thing I do hope the owners can provide is the serial numbers of their D7000, with or without the problem.
     
  58. if your experience with SLRs is with the FE, F801 (N8008) and D50, you haven't used anything as complex as the D7000.​
    I agree completely, this was why I sat with the manual for a while, to try to understand the AF system. The last set of photos I took were in single point mode, using one of the 9 central sensors, and I did set it to focus priority. With fine tuning off, the images were clearly not focused - but on the D50 they were in focus using the same exposure at f4.5.
    With fine tuning on, they were focused at -5 through -20, now that I think about this I suppose this is understandable, based on the depth of field.
    The question I have is whether this is considered defective - does one expect to need to use AF fine tune on this camera out of the box on lenses that work on other bodies?
     
  59. I share some of the frustrations with the focus on the D7000. Coming from a D300, there was no question that the AF capability was " different ". The D300 has a more sophisticated AF capability and I found that shots that would have been sharp with the D300 were not on the D7000, plus the unreliabilty was worrisome. I sent mine to get worked on by Nikon and it is definitely better; as my LCS said it got the attention that it did not get at the factory. I still know it will not match the D300 in some focus situations, but the image quality more than makes up for the focus issues, plus the high ISO performance is much better. They will sell tons of D400's! I am happy and have no regrets now.
     
  60. Tim, the MultiCAM4800 has greater differences than most people assume and it takes some getting used to if someone is coming from the CAM3500 or 1000. The size of the actual focus sensor associated with each FP is larger than the VF boxes so there are more possibilities for someone to give the camera ambiguous directions and the camera picking the more "contrasty" feature in the actual focus sensor aperture which might not be at the same focal plane as the intended target.
    There does seem to be a lot of complaints about the D7000 but I have noticed that a very high percentage of them are resolved by education or breaking old habits instead of correcting defects. Some cases are resolved by warranty service.
    The most common issue I see is the poor problem diagnostics used by users, jumping to conclusions that just do not fit all the evidence and making no attempt to follow the evidence or expand it by well constructed tests. I am not sure where that comes from but it sure must be frustrating for stores and Nikon to be handling so many returned cameras that show no real problem. I have seen no indication that there is a design problem but I sure see a marketing position problem. Nikon's ads and videos are targeting first time photographers or point and shoot users. That likely pays off in sales but it creates a lot of frustration when the camera is actually a very complex camera with 1,000,000 ways to screw up a shot.
    I have met several local photographers who complained about one aspect or another of the camera, one had years of experience although the others were in over their heads and did not really understand the terms used in the manual or did not open the manual. But in each case, by slowing down and avoiding jumping to conclusions, instead using logic and reasoning to pinpoint the source of the dissatisfaction, the problem was resolved.
    The D90 was the last enthusiast camera that was easy for a beginner to jump into. From the D7000 on, the performance capability of newer cameras will test the users habits and understanding about optics and light a great deal more.
    Regarding the D300s being better built....is it? It is heavier and for some that means "better built" but not to an engineer. As materials research advances there are more options for manufacturing and generally the lighter, low the mass the less massive it has to be to protect itself. Which is likely to sustain no ill-effects from a drop on concrete from 5 feet, a 12mpx cellphone camera or a D3? There have no rash of reports of D7000's breaking or not surviving typical rough usage. Lexan cases, over metal superstructure in the D7000 will survive quite well and not get dented or bent like a all metal cast body because of the longer period of time that the lexan outer case will have to dissipate the energy of a blow. Plastic bumpers on cars protect a car and occupants more than heavy chrome bumpers plus are cheaper, and easier to install. I have no doubt the 3 years difference in technology was used effectively in designing a tough yet lower mass case of the D7000. Same with weather resistance. The AF systems between the D7000 and D300 are really the only area where there is parity or an advantage to the D300. Everything else involved with image making is superior with the D7000. The high ISO is often talked about but the low ISO is the most impressive. At 100 ISO, the D7000 is the highest DR and lowest noise and artifact camera Nikon has produced, or any camera that Canon has ever produced. Even the speed of the CH mode is 2.5 times faster in 14 bit mode than the D300.
    All this and only $1199! A couple years ago that was not available at any price.
     
  61. Folks,
    I recently (Nov'11) bought a D7000. For 1.5 months I struggled with my camera, convinced that it had AF issues or a sensor alignment issue.
    Fast forward, the D7000 is not at fault. It has great, very precise AF. The fault, I have concluded, lay in (a) my lenses* being inadequate for the D7000's high-resolving pixel-dense sensor; and (b) my AF technique.
    I am not new to photography or AF or DSLR's... neither do I regard myself as a particularly bad photographer.
    I think the issue is with a lot of folks suddenly being able to buy pro-level equipment and tripping themselves up. It's like handing someone the keys to a sports car and they going ahead and crashing it... and blaming the car.
    *Including the Nikon 50mm f/1.8 AF-D.
     
  62. From what I can gather after reading a lot (too much) about D7000 focus complaints over the last week there are 2 things going on here - a combination of people struggling with a new AF system and some badly calibrated bodies. The D7000 focus system is causing a lot of people to have focus problems when they first use the camera. I've certainly seen a number of comments mirroring the above, saying that after some weeks people realized the camera wasn't the problem but their technique was. It seems to me that the easy way to tell if this is the case is to take some controlled pictures of static objects using AF-S, focus priority. I've done this using a combination of lego figures, black text on white backgrounds, and brick walls.
    There are also quite a few reports out there of D7000s taking OOF pictures in the controlled testing. I've concluded that mine is this variety. What I've seen so far is that on my 18-70 it is OOF with AF Fine Tune off, and the sharpness improves all the way up to -20. I borrowed an 18-200 VR, and did the same test (AF off) with identical results. On my 50 mm f1.8, AF fine tune seems to have no impact, but photos taken with it are less sharp than photos taken with my 18-70 with AF fine tune set to -20.
    The final thing that I've seen is that with my 50 f 1.8, focusing using the side sensors gives me less accurate focus than using the central sensors, even when taking pictures of brick walls. I'm not sure if this is expected, but it surprised me.
    I should comment that when I went snowshoeing with the D7000, I absolutely loved it - the camera is a joy to shoot with. But when I looked at the pictures after I saw the same issues I was concerned about.
     
  63. internet paranoia! people worrying to much, and/or poor technique/inadequate lenses. i have even tried to look for faults, and they just arent there. you have to work a little bit harder to get ultimate sharpness, but, when you do it is well worth it!
     
  64. I earlier noted my own suspicions on this so i sent mine in hoping for relief, especially after I opened the mirror chamber for routine cleaning and it was loaded with shiny little fragments !
     
  65. I am among those Nikon D7000 owners who had to send my camera in for repair. The intermittent Autofocus issue became too annoying. Receipt of my camera repair authorization was on April 16, 2012. After a number of phone calls, here I am at July 6th without a clue when I might expect the repair to be complete.
     
  66. It is strange that nobody understood the reason why camera acts this way.
    D7000 has weak "AF screwdriver". This problem occurs only when optics does not have internal focusing drive and it does not have enough power to screw the focus.
    I have the problem only with 24/2.8 optics, but 85/1.8 works just fine even without internal drive.
    Nikon will never accept this because it is a design problem and the only way to solve it is to change the camera (buy D300s which is an awesome PROFESSIONAL camera).
     
  67. Has anyone else noticed that the focus issue is not restricted to auto-focus? It is impossible to achieve accurate focus using the viewfinder with manual focus as well! Using Live-view, the focus if fine!
    There seems to be a flaw in the optics of this camera, or at least certain batches of individual cameras.
    Using a tripod, plenty of light, plenty of experience achieving razor-sharp focus, and a motionless subject, there is no way to control the focus through the viewfinder!
    Has anyone else seen this? Thanks!
     
  68. anyone who says "there are no factory defect" needs to wait until they have something to say before posting.
     
  69. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    anyone who says "there are no factory defect" needs to wait until they have something to say before posting.​
    What is your point? Do you only want to see those answers that you like?
    Sorry, you are more than welcome to post about your experience with the D7000, be it negative or not. But you don't have the right to dictate what other people post or not post.
     
  70. I don't mean to be rude. My point is that stating categorically that there is no defect, as some previous posters have, is an insult to those of us who have carefully tested and researched to determine that there is actually a defect. Stating that there is no defect adds nothing to the discussion, unless there an explanation of how to make the focus work as it does on other cameras of lesser or equal quality. Thanks.
     
  71. I should add... Focusing through the viewfinder appears to work fine, but the photos are actually back-focused by a significant amount.
     
  72. The focus confirm dot on most of the DX cameras is pretty unreliable. I don't know why but they put more slack in the tolerance on the DX cameras than the FX. You really want to use live view unless you're stopped down a lot.
     
  73. i don't use the focus dot. I focus the old fashioned way, by eye. I have achieved perfect results this way for years, so i swear I know what i am doing.
    I am stopped down to 1.8.
    If one pays for a viewfinder it should work properly. I really don't want to have to use live view because the viewfinder doesn't work properly. Live view is not useful in extrememly bright sunlight, for example.
    The camera IS defective.
    I am attempting to help the readers of this forum, as everyone talks about autofocus assuming that it must be the root of this camera's defect while overlooking overall focus.
    In fact, it seems to be an optical path calibration issue (if that's a valid term). The distance the light is traveling to the sensor is not the same is it is travelling to the viewfinder glass, hence the discrepancy.

    There is a defect. The only actual question is - has anyone else noticed?
    The camera is going back regardless of what the doubters say.
    This is really not very complicated.
     
  74. You can focus a DX camera with a prime lens wide open without any electronic assist? I'm not criticizing, it's just not something most people do, and I've never found it works well.
     
  75. It works with some DX dSLRs. The D2H viewfinder is equal in every way to my F3HP finder with "E" grid screen, including eye relief. Both are equally bright and crisp enough for accurate manual focusing even in dim lighting - I've used both at night for street photos and dimly lit interiors.
    The only other Nikon dSLRs I've tried were the D100, D70, D50 and D90. None could match the D2H finder for accurate manual focus.
    I don't bother with the D2H green focus confirmation dot either. It's not accurate and distracting to use since it's not inline with the eye-to-subject. Using the center AF bracket for confirmation might work, but only if it was actually accurate.
     
  76. Andy:
    Of course I can manually focus a DX camera wide-open. If I couldn't I wouldn't be noticing the discrepancy I'm discussing.
    If the auto-focus had been working properly I probably wouldn't have resorted to manual focus. I am using manual focus because the auto didn't seem to work well. That's how I discovered the optical defect.
    Using a tripod and a non-moving subject, manual focus is no great trick. Perhaps you thought I was shooting a moving subject?
    Thanks for the replies, but apparently noone has any ideas. Oh well. Perhaps the replacement camera will work as designed.
     
  77. Andy:
    Of course I can manually focus a DX camera wide-open. If I couldn't I wouldn't be noticing the discrepancy I'm discussing.
    If the auto-focus had been working properly I probably wouldn't have resorted to manual focus. I am using manual focus because the auto didn't seem to work well. That's how I discovered the optical defect.
    Using a tripod and a non-moving subject, manual focus is no great trick. Perhaps you thought I was shooting a moving subject?
    Thanks for the replies, but apparently noone has any ideas. Oh well. Perhaps the replacement camera will work as designed.
     
  78. What do you want me to say? "You're right, your camera is crap!"? That wouldn't be productive either. I'm commenting that I (and most people I've seen writing about the subject) find it very difficult to get accurate manual focus without an electronic assist on any of the DX DSLRs (from any company, with maybe a few exceptions at the high end). This isn't unique to the D7000. The screens they put in now aren't very good for it and the finders are small (which is why you see a lot of Canon enthusiasts who use lens adapters wanting adapters with focus confirm compatibility and Katz Eye screens). The only decent solution I ever saw was a replacement screen.
     
  79. Good points, Andy. Thank you. You seem to know more about cameras than I do.
    It is indeed quite difficult to manually focus this camera, and I would rather not do it. The auto-focus through the viewfinder is not working well though, so I tried manual focus to rule out the auto-focus as the cause of the problem and noticed that neither seem to work.
    I can use autofocus fine-tuning but fear that will not work well with my zoom lens. Is that a valid fear?
     
  80. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Even back in the 1970's when I was a teenager, I needed the split-image focus assist to focus manually, on bodies such as the FT3, FE, etc.
    Today, if you are using a tripod, I would use live view to focus manually. You can greatly magnify the image on the back LCD to fine tune the focus. At least I find that far more accurate than any method before live view was available since 2007 (on the D3 and D300).
     
  81. That is definitely true. I feel that the viewfinder auto-focus should work though, since they went through the trouble and expense of producing it. If that worked I wouldn't even be thinking about manaul focus.
    One of the 'features' of this camera is the relatively nice viewfinder. If people can't use it becuase neither auto nor manual focus is reliable, then i'd call that a problem.
     
  82. Wow...its amazing how many photographers here want to blame user error on the D7000's low light focusing problems!
    Please explain this to me:
    I shoot a lot of events at night to help pay the bills, and I've experienced inconsistent focusing results with the D7000 in low light when I know it can't be my technique. You see, I shoot 2 or 3 shots of each grouping of people --- standing right in front of me posing --- with AF-assist on the SB600 and Single, yet invariably one of the images is out of focus.
    Why does the D7000 not provide consistent focus for consecutive identical shots?
    My old D200 works beautifully at these events, so I've gone back to it for these kind of shoots. But thank you Photo,net...If Nikon can repair this, I'm sending it in.
     
  83. There is definitely a problem with the focus. I bought new D7000 before about 8 months and I can say that the body is definitely bad calibrated ... I tested the AF in controlled conditions and when the AF Fine Tune is set to -16, the result is the closest to that obtained when the focus through Live View. If the lighting is worse (tungsten), it is need higher value AF Fine Tune, probably more than -20. Tomorrow I send the body is calibrated and we'll see what the outcome will be...
     
  84. Hi all im new to these forums, I would just ike to say when I 1st got my D7000 I was chuffed to bits with it, I was getting very very good results. Then after about 8 months I started getting frustrated as the images where not as good a quality as they used to be (and this was a sudden change in the quality) I looked in to it and discovered this whole back focus issue and done some testing, in live view the AF was perfect as it was using contrast detection as per info provided by what the sensor was picking up, however then using the viewfinder to take shots I was finding that the camera would appear in focus but would be slightly out (AF wise) I also confirmed this with auto focus charts.

    I tried the usual AF fine tuning which worked to a certain degree but still want as tac sharp as I would like, I put up with it like this for over 4 months thinking it was just me being too judgemental over my images, until one day I thought "I've had enough of this" and took it back to the shop where the camera was purchased from (thankfully I had an extended warranty)
    Wilkinson cameras sent the D7000 off to Nikon who performed diagnostics and determined that work needed to be carried out, they performed a full clean and re-calibration of the AF mechanism and more importantly replaced the full mirror mechanism/carriage as mentioned in a few posts)
    Since getting the camera back I have fell in love with it again and im getting some awesome shots too boot
    [​IMG]
     

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