Nikkor 60mm f/2.8D AF Micro - ACCURACY of DESCRIPTION

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by jpb, Apr 23, 2012.

  1. jpb

    jpb

    Hello,
    I have a friend who is selling a Nikon lens but doesn't really know the technical side of things. In responding to an inquiry about her lens, she wrote a description and asked me to review it for accuracy, however, I do not shoot Nikon and so am unfamiliar with their product line. I told her that what she wrote sounds accurate, but to be sure I'd have to ask a real Nikonian.
    Would someone mind taking a quick look at the following text and let me know if it is accurate and complete in what it's trying to express? re: Nikon Micro- Nikkor 60mm f/2.8D AF
    "The 60mm f/2.8 AF-D has been replaced by a a newer AF-S version which does the same thing but costs much more. The main advantage of the AF-S version is easier access to manual focus and that is can autofocus on Nikon's cheapest D40,D40X, and D60. Also, the gentleman noted that he has a Nikon D5000 but from my research it says that the AF is not supported on the D5000 cameras."
    Thanks.
    James
     
  2. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    I would just specify that it is the AF-D version instead of AF-S. Therefore, there is no build-in AF motor inside the lens.
    The buyer should be able to figure out the compatibility issues. It is their responsibility.
    In reality, the AF-D version will not AF with these Nikon DSLRs: D40, D40X, D60, D3000, D3100, D3200 (new), D5000, and D5100. The thing is that as new DSLRs are introduced, this list will grow. E.g. the D3200 was announced just last week.
     
  3. Confuse them and you lose them. Just describe what you are selling, period. Don't become a consultant to the buyer. Direct them to the Nikon USA website.
    For example:
    For sale; Nikon auto focus close-up lens, model is 60mm /f2.8D-AF Micro Nikkor. Condition [...]
     
  4. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    I think Dan Brown and I are making the same point. Just specify what the seller is selling, perhaps add a line pointing out that it is the AF-D instead of AF-S G.
    However, in case a buyer sounds somewhat confused, it does not hurt to check with that specific buyer via e-mail which camera(s) he/she is using. If it is among one of those I listed, the seller may want to point out the AF concern, as you probably don't want to get into a return and refund situation if you can avoid it up front. But I wouldn't put too much info in the ad as that may confuse people.
     
  5. I would also note that your draft
    description references an AF-D lens,
    but the proposed title for the listing just
    says AF. This lens was made in both D
    and non-D versions, so it would be
    good to be clear about which this is.
     
  6. Oops. I just realized that your caption
    does indeed include the D designation,
    though in a different order. Sorry.
     
  7. "The buyer should be able to figure out the compatibility issues. "
    You'd think so, wouldn't you? :) ;-)
    But my experience with hundreds of buyers suggests that many of them need you to hold their hand and guide them in figuring out if what you are selling will work on their equipment, even if you explicitly list exactly what equipment will work with what you are selling.
     
  8. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Michael, of course a lot of potential buyers are going to be confused. However, at least my point is that I wouldn't list in the "for sale" ad that this AF-D lens is not fully compatible with a bunch of recent Nikon DSLRs because that sounds negative.
    If a buyer askes specifically, the OP and his seller friend has the list of Nikon DSLRs that have no AF motor inside the camera.
     
  9. Seems to me that the attention should be put on the camera, here is how I would word it:

    This AF-D 60mm f/2.8 lens requires a Nikon camera with a lens drive motor to auto focus, often called screw drive. On a camera without that motor, the lens will only manual focus. Please check your manual or the Nikon web site to see if your camera supports AF-D auto focus.
     
  10. I think this would cover the entire list: D50 thru D90 models, D7000, D100 thru D800 models, D1 thru D4 models.

    Or it could be expanded; D50, D70 models, D90, D7000, D100, D200, D300 models, D700, D800 models, D1 models, D2 models, D3 models, D4 models.
     
  11. As a seller you have the option of including a detailed technical description for an item using eBay's listing tools. During the process of creating the listing it will ask you to look up the item. Even if you choose not to, the listing will continue to remind you that one is available in the listing on your seller's page. Then either above/below insert your own comments about the condition of the item.
     
  12. jpb

    jpb

    Thanks so much for your informed responses, and especially to Shun Cheung and Michael Kohan for the details we needed.
    Best,
    James
     
  13. Your friend should keep the older lens and sell the new one. The older Micro 60 is by far the better optic. I don't know why, but it it's sharper and better to use all around. As to camera compatibility, there is no motor in the less expensive DX cameras like the new 3200, and the 5100 so you can only use AF-S lenses on these. The 300 and 7000 have a motor. All the FX cameras have motors and the old Micro 60 works well with them. There is no "trend" toward camera bodies without a motor. Nikon makes them without a motor because they are lighter and cheaper, therefore good travel camera alternatives to point and shoot and great entry level cameras.
     
  14. Just simply state that it's an 60mm f/2.8 micro Nikkor AF-D. Don't state any incompatibility as it would confuse the buyer and sounds not very good. Then if the buyer has any question just answer them accurately.
     

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