New to M6, Question on usage..

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by don_m|1, Aug 29, 2000.

  1. I'm a new Leica user: M6-TTL, 28mm Elmarit, 90mmSummicron having
    moved to shis stage in my life from Hassy, and Nikon F5. I still use
    a Noblex MF for those "grand" shots, and a Konica Hexar for my P&S
    which delives excellent results. I'v decided to lighten the load and
    move to Leica. Question: Is multiple exposure possible with the
    current version M6 (get it in 2-3 days) and can one use filters such
    as grduated ND be used on the M6?

    <p>

    Than
     
  2. ND grads are probably the most difficult filter to use with success on
    a rangefinder, except for maybe a close up lens. A polarizer is easy
    by comparison. Without being able to look through the lens at the
    taking aperture, it will only be dumb luck if you actually get the
    effect you are hoping for. I have tried to use a graduated filter on
    a fuji 645 range finder, and it didn't work out so great. On my SLR,
    I can really see the effect, which changes depending on the f stop
    chosen.

    <p>

    I don't believe any of the M series cameras had a provision for double
    exposures--I know my M3 can't, unless there is some secret technique I
    don't know about.
     
  3. Doing multiple exposures with a M camera (except the M5)
    causes damage to the winding mechanism. On some cameras
    you can hold the rewind button in (lever on M6) and this allows
    you to cock the shutter without advancing the film. When you do
    this with a M, the winding mechanism makes terrible grinding
    noises. Definitely a bad idea.
     
  4. Check with Leica.It makes a noise but DOES NO damage.Check no slack in film by softly turning rewind.Stop at resistance.Hold rewind with finger.Set switch to rewind and hold.With remaining fingers cock shutter by moving the advance lever.Thats it.
    Have done hundreds of doubles.Not always succesful as with cameras made to do it.Suggest you forget all the toys of SLR world and use M for straight photography.Stop worrying about your Leica,simply use it.I use mine daily.Pro and personal work.Done it for 33 years with M3.So it looks used.The chrome is wearing off leaving a golden glow! Shot about 3500 rolls.Try that with anything else....
     
  5. I'd have to concur with John on this one. I took two M6's without
    film, removed the bottom plate, held finger pressure against the take-
    up spool (to simulate film with no slack), and with the rewind lever
    switched to the "R" position, attempted to advance the wind lever.

    <p>

    It was clear that the advance lever was not going to move without
    tremendous force. Also, the rewind lever kept snapping back to the
    normal operating position. I would conclude that this can't be good
    for the mechanism, as you should never force a precision machine. I
    did this for years with older SLR's without any problem, but the M
    series Leica seems to have a differently designed film train system.

    <p>

    As I have been using M's for over 10 years and this is the first time
    that I even tried this, (due to your question), maybe there is logic
    to the point that the RF Leica is not the best special effects tool
    for photography... Keep it real.
     
  6. Don't you dare toy with your new M camera like that. Skip trying to
    use your M camera as an SLR -- it's just not made for it. Even though
    you possibly _could_ use your M for double exposures, why do it? Use
    the SLR for the tricky stuff. Put the Konica down and use your M as
    your P&S. I guarantee the results will be better. Also, skip the
    g.ND filter. If you're using anything more than a UVa or Skylight on
    your M camera, you're trying too hard.
     
  7. Hmmmm. Multiple exposures and subtle filters are really the domain of
    an SLR, Leica M nut that I am.

    <p>

    Off the top of my head, you could rewind the shutter on an LTM Leica
    by turning the shutter speed dial and get multiple exposures, but I
    could be wrong about this.

    <p>

    For more ideas/opinions on SLRs vs rangefinders, see my web page,

    <p>

    http://wizard.net/~tbryant/photo35.html

    <p>

    Vidi Luminium.
     
  8. By all means check with Leica. I did. It will cause damage,
    expensive damage.
     
  9. Thanks for the update imformation.I use old M3 and M2 which can do double exposures.The M6 seems a very different animal...
     
  10. Yes, I used to do the same with my M-3s--no problem. Just having a
    sound you aren't accustomed to is not necessarily a sign something
    horrible is happening--I always assumed that it was an issue of a
    gear somewhere trying to push down a lever which would then pop back
    up, and that someday one of the two would wear out quicker than
    otherwise, but probably not in my lifetime. There certainly wasn't
    any indication from any source at the time that it could be
    dangerous, and I believe I picked up the idea from some Leica manual
    or another.

    <p>

    Wouldn't it be nice if at least one of the Leica lists had someone on
    it who actually fixes the things and could give authoritative answers
    to questions like this? I would not even sure that the person who
    answers the phone at Leica HQ would necessarily give the right
    answer--as we all know the standard factory reply to any question is
    almost always if it's not in the instructions it's wrong, with an
    inplication that if they catch you they'll punish you (using off-
    brand inkjet inks is a great example)--such advice isn't always based
    in fact, and doens't always come from someone who has any idea what
    the right answer is.
     
  11. Never do double exposures with any M camera except the M5. I asked
    the head technician of Kindermann Canada and, after he recovered, he
    warned me, in no uncertain terms, not to do multiple exposures by
    forcing the shutter to cock while holding the rewind lever or button.
    I have also have seen this question come up on the LUG and all the
    experienced users repeated that Leica warns against doing multiple
    exposures this way. If you must do mutiple exposures then before
    loading the camera, fire the shutter, then load making sure to pull
    the leader so that it touches the camera body. Shoot your series of
    first exposures, then rewind the film with out pulling the film
    leader all the way in. Now reload exactly the same way (shutter fired
    and leader to the body) and registration should be fine.

    <p>

    Cheers
     

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