New artefacts on my negs

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by pjmeade, Jan 27, 2020.

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  1. Hello all,
    I'm a new Leica owner, I have a Leica iiif that I've had for a few months. I've just had the second film through the camera and have noticed some artifacts that appear on every fame of the film. They weren't on the previous film I had processed.
    In loading that film, I had problems getting the film (with a correctly cut film leader) and had to remove it and reinsert it. Have I damaged the shutter curtain? I can't really look just now, because there's a fresh film in the camera.
    Thanks for your advice. 61310014_1_Tw.jpg
     
  2. Pin holes in the shutter curtain by the looks of things. When the camera is empty, shine a light through the body in a dark room and watch for light coming through the curtain.
     
  3. Good idea, but you sort of can't do that with a Leica IIIf without removing the body shell.
     
  4. Oh ok, yes that makes it difficult

    I found this video
    Link ....
     
  5. On cameras where you can open up the back, a black fabric paint will do a fairly permanent job (done, as always, with "less is more" approach) of sealing up small holes in the curtain. However, on a classic LTM Leica, ....

    As in the video, you can get in, but you still need to figure out where the holes are and "some dissassembly" is required. The video shows way too enthusiastic application of the rubber (as I said, I think a flat-black fabric paint/dye is better)
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2020
  6. thanks all
     
  7. I agree with JDM, fabric paint applied only only on the pinholes is a better option, I've seen cases where Liquid Electrical Tape will start to flake once it's been flexed enough times or the underlying rubber starts to crack.
     
  8. If me, Iā€™d just send the camera to Youxin Ye and get new shutter curtains installed.
     
  9. Per Greg if you plan to frequently use your IIIf. The original curtains are over 60 years old and the material deteriorates. Time for a CLA.
     

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