Myths Of The Photography Business

Discussion in 'Business of Photography' started by dcstep, Jan 23, 2017.

  1. I thought that this article was worth the read: http://digital-photography-school.com/myths-realities-becoming-professional-photographer/
     
  2. The article doesn't seem very different from other accounts of the perils of becoming a professional photographer except for the beginning, in which the author describes viciously biting his teacher when he was five years old. I thought the biting might foreshadow a great emphasis on the importance of people skills, but it did not.
     
  3. Don't think he's saying much > 've seen this show before. Back in the 80's I gave a thought or two or five, to become a pro. I quickly realized that I'd be chasing the photo fairs circuit (various cities and states) and the rest the time (year) I'd focus on obtaining the images. Great, except I'd have no time for me...or any sort of social life (friends, what friends ?). Anyway, the writing was on the wall and in a v. large letters. I wanted to continue to enjoy photography....other than learning how to hate it due massive amount of constraints.
    Different folks may have different reality....
    Les
     
  4. Learning photography at a real school is a lot of work and should only be done at the college level.
    I did that in 1969 at a four year university which assigned photography to the school of applied science. There were instructors in this school who HAD NEVER GIVEN AN "A" in their entire career. Luckily not in photography. College was actually like that back then
    The course was technically and artistically challenging. Most of the fine arts majors decamped in the two week period allowed for dropping the course. I stuck it out and got one of the rare "A" grades the instructor awarded. It was a lot of hard work and that is what real photography actually is. Don't settle for less.
     
  5. Michael, I'm glad to read that you got an A. How did the career in photography work out, with that foundation?
     
  6. Quite well, thank you.
    I am a retired pensioner from the company which developed and commercially introduced the 35mm camera.
     

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