Mystery movie Camera?

Discussion in 'Extreme, Retro, Instant and More' started by gary_palmer|1, Jul 31, 2016.

  1. Hi All.
    I have this old movie camera. It states Newman & Sinclair but I cannot find any info on google which is an achievement in itself.
    It came with a very nice 18mm Cooke Lens so I suspect the movie camera was of a good quality.
    Any help would be appreciated.
    Thanks in adavance
    00e4oH-564650684.jpg
     
  2. I have more pictures but don't seem to be able to upload them
    00e4oR-564651084.jpg
     
  3. Final pic
     
  4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newman-Sinclair
     
  5. I cannot quite see the dial at the bottom on the right hand side - does this have numbers like 16, 24, 32, 64, 128? This is a relatively simple camera but with a sophisticated (reflex) viewfinder. I suspect it is for some kind of special purpose cinematography, maybe slow motion (if it has speeds like 64 or 128 fps as mentioned above). Over 50 years ago I visited the Sinclair shop at the corner of Charing Cross Road and Whitehall in London - a true Aladdin's cave!
     
  6. Just one final thought - almost all Newman & Sinclair movie cameras which I've ever seen resemble a cornflake packet made out of duralumin. This camera looks totally different. If I had to take a wild guess, I'd say this camera is an American design produced by N & S under licence, possibly as part of a government contract, during World War II. It looks very much like the kind of camera issued to military newsreel photographers.
     
  7. "I'd say this camera is an American design produced by N & S under licence, possibly as part of a government contract, during World War II. It looks very much like the kind of camera issued to military newsreel photographers."

    I'm in the U.S. and this doesn't look like any movie camera I've ever seen here. The standard U.S. combat camera for movies in WWII was the 35mm Bell and Howell Eyemo, with the 16mm B&H Filmo also used sometimes. This doesn't look anything like either one of them. Those had rounded tops and bottoms, while this is very boxy. They also usually had a three lens turret and were not reflex. This is a spinning-mirror reflex camera as can be seen by the part that comes out at a 45-degree angle to enclose the mirror-shutter.
     

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