More Angkor images

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by tim_tan|1, Apr 3, 2002.

  1. Two more images for your comments...

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    http://www.photo.net/photodb/folder.tcl?folder_id=196292

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    Tks,
     
  2. tim.

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    these to me look like "pictures of angkor" and nothing else. don't
    know what your trying to achieve, my pursuit is fine art in
    photography so maybe we're after different things. the pictures are
    interesting because they are angkor but i am wondering what tim tan
    brought to the table to make these "his" and making them different
    from anyone elses pictures of angkor. if documenting angkor was what
    you were trying to achieve then you did that (and i am not trying to
    be sarcastic).

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    i would gladly look at more.

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    good luck
     
  3. Tim, Thanks for sharing your photos. Now I know why you
    suggested I bring wide angles to my trip to Angkor next week.
    First of all I would have selected more suitable lighting
    conditions before taking scenic shots, either very early morning
    or very late in the afternoon. I would have used a tripod and an
    aperture that gave me more depth of field especially for your shot
    of the door way, else an ultrawide with the statue in the
    foreground if you need to handheld. Maybe you were traveling on
    a group tour and didn't have control over time and place. Under
    these conditions I would have skipped the scenics to avoid too
    much sky and concentrate on the monks perhaps with a tele or a
    super wide environmental portrait.
     
  4. I love the color--saffron against stone. I wouldn't mind seeing the
    photographer a lot closer, with that wide angle, to really fill out
    the frame.
     
  5. Tim:

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    Really good photos.

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    I have an almost exact duplicate of the saffron cloaked statue - a
    real great setup, Fine Art or not.

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    I also have one of the Lake but with kids instead of the monks.

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    I do not know what John Molloy's point is. What else would he have
    done?

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    I have seen much "Art" photography in the last week-ICP, Leica
    Gallery, MOMA in NYC and would love to hear a definition of "Art
    Photography" from Mr. Molloy.

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    I also bought books by John Sexton, W. Eugene Smith, HCB, Kertez &
    Man Ray while there: again what is "Art Photography"?? Is Weegee's
    stuff art?

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    To me it is an image that makes you look and say WOW, because of the
    content, composition, lighting, etc.

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    On the seated statue, I would crop out the headless(likely stolen by
    poachers-I Hate Those Guys!!) seated figure to emphasize the subject
    and the vertical.

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    The safforn colour itself against a stone background makes just about
    any photo "art" .

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    I will be going there again this year and will try improving on what
    I did 2 yrs ago. Thanks for the Pix.

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    Cheers
     
  6. richard ilomaki wrote:
    **john molloy’s reply**
    I do not know what John Molloy's point is. What else would he have
    done?
    **composed it better, got closer, everything that would make this
    picture better. everything that you do to make sure it works. or
    comes damn close. i cannot tell you how to take a good picture on
    the internet anymore than i can tell you in person.**

    <p>

    I have seen much "Art" photography in the last week-ICP, Leica
    Gallery, MOMA in NYC and would love to hear a definition of "Art
    Photography" from Mr. Molloy.
    **mr. molloy is not going to get into a debate about what he
    considers fine art photography because it will come down to
    semantics. my point is this, tim’s images did not work for me. he
    was in Angkor and in my opinion he did not get close enough to a
    powerful shot. something that makes me say “wow”, “beautiful”
    or “*X&$#**X&$#**X&$#**X&$#* i wish i could say that was mine” and i can tell you i hold
    myself up to a very, very high standard. do i get good photographs?
    yes i do. do i take a lot of *X&$#**X&$#**X&$#**X&$#*? you bet. but if i put these
    pictures in for this forum to critique i would expect some people to
    not be very impressed. sorry tim, to be dragging this on. you here
    reading all this and thinking “shut up already“ .**

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    I also bought books by John Sexton, W. Eugene Smith, HCB, Kertez &
    Man Ray while there: again what is "Art Photography"?? Is Weegee's
    stuff art?
    **who’s weegee? i would consider it art, wouldn’t you? don’t like
    any of those photographers (is that ok?).**

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    To me it is an image that makes you look and say WOW, because of the
    content, composition, lighting, etc.
    **like i said, doesn’t make me go wow. depends how high you raise
    the bar. i will always be honest. and i don’ t think i was harsh.**

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    **tim i would like to see more of your images.**

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    **cheers**
     
  7. May be Ray Tai could share some of his pics when he returns from his
    forthcoming trip to Angkor Wat. I would love to see how others
    approach the subject matter.
    Would it be a travelogue? usual postcard pics? message to convey?
    fine art? human/sacred element to protray? other themes??

    <p>

    That's why I posted these pics to try find out whether others share
    the same feeling as I took the pics .

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    Thanks for your valuable comments.
     
  8. Tim and Ray:

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    I spent one morning in Angkor Wat about two years ago - and it was
    way too short. I have included a few of my photos in my Cambodian
    folder (I took about 6 rolls so there are a lot more Angkor shots
    that I can upload if you are interested). I have just started
    photography then - some of the photos were taken with a Voigt 15mm on
    a IIIf. In retrospect, the photos were not bad for a rank beginner
    (although it's more likely due to the magic of the place) but I
    should have done a better job on the scanning part. The actual photos
    and chromes are much better.

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    What is interesting is that the shot in the Royal Palace. I was
    reading through the Nat Geo archives and they have a b&w photo taken
    in 1901 which look remarkably similar.

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    Ray: Wide angles (even ultra-wides) are indispensible.

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    http://www.photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=117096

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    Johnson
     
  9. Johnson, Nice photos. I have a total of 3.5 days in Cambodia and
    will need to spend 2 days in Phnom Penh on company business so I
    don't even know if I have time to get to Angkor this time around. I
    would appreciate any tips on photographing Phnom Penh. I am more
    interested in people and how they interact with their
    culture/environment and less on scenics.
     
  10. Ray:

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    I don't know about the weather at this time of the year, but I founnd
    the people in Phnom Pheng very friendly. The city is a gold mine for
    street photography if you are into that vein. When I took the photos,
    I was just starting out and did not have the photo techniques nor the
    people skills. A more experienced person would have gotten lots of
    interesting shots.

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    Johnson
     
  11. johnson

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    i like the one of the topless girl(?). that's what i like the most.
     
  12. AHA!!!!

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    Now I know what Mr Molloy calls "Art": Boobs. LOL:>:>:>

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    Cheers
     

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