Monday in Nature Weekly Photo Sept. 28, 2015

Discussion in 'Nature' started by lgw, Sep 28, 2015.

  1. Basic Guidelines: Nature based subject matter. Please, declare captive subjects. Keep your image at/under 700 pixels on the long axis for in-line viewing and try to keep file size under 300kb. Note that this includes photos hosted off-site at Flicker, Photobucket, your own site, etc. Feel free to link your image to a larger version. In the strictest sense, nature photography should not include hand of man elements. Please refrain from images with obvious buildings or large man made structures like roads, fences, walls. Try to minimize man made features and keep the focus on nature.

    Are you new to this thread? We post one image per week. For more details on guidelines please read this helpful information.
    Monday Morning Greetings,
    No matter how much we learn about a subject in nature, the unknown shows up. There's a lot out that's not in field guides. Something may be common in one location, but not on your side of the mountain, or state, or country, so you don't see it. You don't know anyone who has seen it, so that unknown thing never comes up in conversation. You don't even know that you're happy in a state of ignorant bliss. Then, one day, some how, you cross paths with the unknown. And, oddly, being ignorant and unknowing doesn't seem to matter. That stuff is really cool, and the world seems to stop turning while you greet the stranger and hope it sits still long enough for a photo or two.
    Phlebia coccineofulva was unknown to me until we met on a walk in the woods with a group of mycologists. We marveled at the intense colors and fragile texture. In this 1:1 image it looks like a gassy nebula, but it's really paper thin. Pretty cool stuff.
    Let's see what you've seen in nature, whether unknown or well understood. You just might meet something new for Monday in Nature.
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  2. Daedalea pores
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  3. Went apple picking this weekend. After an hour we had about a 5 gal bucket of small, sour semi-wild apples soon to be enjoyed as hard cider.
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  4. Green bug on sunflower.
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  5. Well spiders are hardly unknown, but what the sun does to their webs never fails to surprise and intrigue me.
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  6. Portrait of a long-legged fly (aka Dolichopodidae)
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  7. Not new to me but nonetheless I am always happy to find these in my woods every fall.
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  8. stemked

    stemked Moderator

    I can only contribute a 'loony" image today. We were cloudy but for about three seconds the 'Super-Blood Moon was viable so I got off a few images.
    [​IMG]
    Carmel, IN 'Super-Blood Moon'. Pentax K3, 600mm f5.6
     
  9. Shot from clear skies in Vermont
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  10. Tiger Swallowtail seen at Pedernales Falls SP in central Texas.
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  11. Blood Moon/Super Moon/Harvest Moon
    [​IMG]
     
  12. A hawk, near a pond, Iowa.
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  13. Gup

    Gup Gup

    I've just returned from a few weeks on Canada's PEI. This shot was taken with a new P&S from aboard the ferry coming back to Nova Scotia. The sandy spit was dotted with hundreds of migratory birds assembling for the long flight to their winter homes.
    This camera is a Fuji XP85 purchased for its ability to take a beating, to perform under water and also because it was sold with a floating strap. It replaces a very capable Canon Elph that was not sold with a floating strap... that now resides at the bottom of the Saugeen River (the river claimed two cameras from two upturned canoes on that trip alone). So far I am more of a fan of the smaller Canon although both have their strengths and weaknesses. Shooting either from this particular ferry on this particular day required some experience. The wind made for a very unstable platform and bracing against the railings or bulkheads induced a tuning fork-like experience into the mix.
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  14. Here's my unknown. It appears to be a moldy mushroom - shown before and after a rain storm. It seems odd that the mold would be washed off so easily, so maybe this is some mechanism for dispersing spores?
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  15. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Tule elks (Cervus canadensis nannodes) at the Tomales Peninsula at the Point Reyes National Seashore.
    Nikon D750 with 200-500mm/f5.6 zoom @ 500mm.
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  16. Spider's web after a foggy morning.
    [​IMG]Canon 7D + Sigma 105mm macro + Kenko 1.4X TC
     
  17. Horseshoe crab. In Maine we are near the northernmost part of their range. Used to see them by the thousands in southern Delaware as a kid.
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  18. Belly side of a labyrinth orbweaver
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  19. stemked

    stemked Moderator

    Edwin,
    Love the image. I didn't have a clue what it was until I read the bottom, great photo. Thanks for sharing.
     
  20. Edwin - don't know if it's the low resolution limit of photo.net but I really don't see a horseshoe crab there. Not sure what it is. Here's one from a local museum, and it has a long spike for a tail...
    00dVox-558635584.jpg
     
  21. Shun, a nice demo of your new lens!
    M. Mehtar, what beautiful webbed pearls!
    Rick Bortnick, is that microscopy?
    And the mushrooms look so delicious, especially when I haven't had lunch yet.
    Anyhow, while you guys are doing all these cool things, I ran into Big Foot in the forest - and I am lucky to be alive! ;-)
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  22. Lovely harbingers of fall, Bittersweet.
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  23. Edwin, great image. I didn't know that horseshoe crabs had compound eyes until I saw your post.
    Limestone shoals on Lake Huron at the base of the Bruce Peninsula. Look out boats!
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  24. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    When I lived in New Jersey, I used to see lots of horseshoe carbs in Cape May (southern tip of New Jersey) around the middle of May, across the bay from Delaware. They have a shell and a long tail. Maybe Edwin accidentally uploaded a different image from the one he intended.
     
  25. Patrick and Shun, Edwin's shot is a closeup of the crab's compound left eye plus left side of the carapace ... it had me puzzled too for a while :)
     
  26. Patrick, the shot is a detail of the carapace of a horseshoe crab showing the lateral compound eye.

    The lateral eye is clearly visible in the mounted specimen of your photograph.

    The spiky "tail" is to the far right out of the image in my photo.
     
  27. John, Doug - horseshoe crabs are among my favorite "primitive" animals. If you ever get a chance to see their breeding
    frenzy in Delaware or New Jersey and the simultaneous shore bird extravaganza, it is well worth the trip.

    The water actually turns blueish there are so many eggs suspended in the water and one could, in principle tho I wouldn't
    do it, walk across the backs of the crabs without ever touching the sand.
     
  28. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Thanks for the clarification, but it is still difficult for me to see that as a closeup of a horseshoe crab.
     
  29. I missed the earlier moon shots, so here's another bit of last night's eclipse.
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  30. I went out to chase bees the other day, and this neat little moth showed up, so I chased it for a while instead. Certainly well equipped to drink from a flower.
    This is with the 85/2.8 PCD micro lens, a huge heavy thing that is hard to use freehand, but occasionally it hits.
    00dVpR-558636584.jpg
     
  31. Since I am limited to one image, I can't show you the pre-cropped shot, which may or may not clarify anyway. This image from the side may help:
    http://cdn2.arkive.org/media/F7/F7D1B9BF-AEA6-45E2-8D06-E1089B0524C6/Presentation.Large/Horseshoe-crab.jpg
    The detail encompasses part of the carapace, or shell, with the lateral eye and lateral ridge; the eye being the kidney bean shaped object. The glistening quality is simply due to its being partially submerged.
     
  32. Wow... I can't say I've ever seen their eye close up, but I'd swear that's a picture of a beach with some cracked mud just barely covered by water and some kind of seashell. I believe you, I'm just saying it's so hard to get a grasp on it because I don't know what it's supposed to look like!
    If photo.net ever holds an abstract photo competition, you have... pardon the pun... a shoe in!
     
  33. John, great spider shot. It provides a 3-dimensionality I don't often appreciate in spider web shots.
     
  34. Katherine, I think that is pokeberry. Bittersweet is a vine and has small yellowish orange round pods.
     
  35. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    but I'd swear that's a picture of a beach with some cracked mud just barely covered by water and some kind of seashell.​
    That was exactly what I thought.
    BTW, as long as it is for explanation purposes, I would imagine that it is acceptable to post a second image to the thread, and that image doesn't have to be nature (as Patrick's museum capture above).
    Everybody's primary entry to these threads should meet the nature guidelines, and Laura would like to limit to just one image per person per week. Of course, there are always some occasional exceptions, but please observe those guidelines.
     
  36. Tail to the right but not visible due to attached and breeding male and photo's limited perspective
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  37. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    I thought I had seen a lot of horseshoe crabs in New Jersey, but I never noticed that their shells have such crack patters. Usually my focus was in the egg-laying season (full moon in May) and the sea birds feasting on those eggs.
     
  38. I had not really thought about it before but you prompted me to look at the 3 horseshoe crab shells on my shelf and they all have that pattern to varying degrees of visibility. I think they are all from Maine (one definitely is - it is still decaying) so I suppose there could be regional variation but I suspect I had just never noticed it before, not having inspected them that closeup.
     
  39. apologies for forgetting which forum this is and posting two images. Oops.
     
  40. Matthew,
    Snap of the whip............forgiven ;-)
    Edwin,
    Thanks for the additional view. I've never seen these crabs on the beach, but have always wanted to. I'm going to look a lot closer if I get the chance. The close up is stunning.
     
  41. [​IMG]Some fantastic shots today - closeups and long distance moon shots.
    Mine is just some birch in parc Tremblant a couple of days ago. The backdrop is this huge rock that I found colorful.
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  42. Gup

    Gup Gup

    Edwin, that shot is captivating. I've picked up many empty horseshoe crab shells on beaches I've combed and never seen an eye up that close, probably because they are sans eyes at that point, and the shells all appeared smooth.
    Congratulations on fooling most of us, regardless of your intentions. :)
     
  43. Last September I was caught by the alpine storm and spent a quite rough night on the high altitude. Don’t want to create a long story of surviving experience – it’s not related to photography anyhow. Early morning when the storm began winding down I started the descending. I had been in the clouds for several hours already and totally soaked with moisture, but at the elevation below 4000’ I saw that the clouds were dissipating and it became much warmer and quitter. I set up my Nikon N80 on the tripod and fired several shots of this beautiful view of Keene Valley and the clouds beneath me.
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  44. Thanks, Gup. Definitely no intentions to fool anyone.
     
  45. Hello all,
    A damselfly (either boreal or northern bluets; can't distinguish without having a specimen in hand) mating wheel. Made back in July along the Zealand Fall trail in the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire.
    [​IMG]
    Nikon D300 with 36 mm extension tube and a 300 mm f/4 lens.
     
  46. An interesting, varied thread this week. Since I'm not at all knowledgeable about nature, but I love photographing it and trying to learn more, it is easy for me to come across the unknown :) This week when I was scanning the garden I saw a small green insect resting on the edge of a Cosmos flower.
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  47. Great shots this week.
    I took a couple of pictures of an unknown (to me) caterpillar on my hydrangea but they are still on the card and it was too cloudy to see the eclipse. Instead this is just a bee on a flower.
    [​IMG]
     
  48. Mary,
    Thanks for the nod. It's a pure macro shot.
     
  49. A 109-year-old giant tortoise at the Reptile Gardens near Rapid City, South Dakota. He weighs 500 lbs and is magnificent! --Sally
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  50. [​IMG]
    Huangshan,Jiangxi,China
    Leica R5, Summicron R 90mm /2
     

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