Monday in Nature October 17, 2016

Discussion in 'Nature' started by lgw, Oct 17, 2016.

  1. Basic Guidelines: Nature based subject matter. Please, declare captive subjects. Keep your image at/under 700 pixels on the long axis for in-line viewing and try to keep file size under 300kb. Note that this includes photos hosted off-site at Flicker, Photobucket, your own site, etc. Feel free to link your image to a larger version. In the strictest sense, nature photography should not include hand of man elements. Please refrain from images with obvious buildings or large man made structures like roads, fences, walls. Minimize man made features and keep the focus on nature.

    Are you new to this thread? We post one image per week. For more details on guidelines please read this helpful information.
    Greetings,
    Our photonet friends in many places have been facing very difficult conditions with wild weather. Be careful out there as you contend with nature's tempest.
    Turning over a new leaf may help change a bad photo habit, but turn over a rock or log and you may find a whole new world. Nature is like that and the wonder of it all is why we get out there with our gear. The joy of meeting an organism face to face for the first time never looses its appeal or satisfaction. A flower, bird, mushroom, tree, or aquatic creature cease to be a picture page in a book and become living things with textures and colors that always exceed expectation. Then we want to take our own photos for our own books. We all share these experiences in nature and it's always fun to have them shared here.
    Phlebia tremellosa was one of many additions to the notebooks lately. It's very common, but that doesn't matter. A forest is a big place and it's hard to pay super duper attention to everything. It has wonderful depth for something that is only about 1/8 inch thick, and feels soft and a bit rubbery, rather like the word phlebia sounds. After turning over a log, we are no longer strangers.
    Have you met anything interesting? Time to grab some coffee, or tea, and get the week under way, naturally. You know what day it is. MIN.
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  2. Very nice Laura.
    While I have seen plenty of small things under logs and growing on them over this past week, I will offer up a somewhat wider view this time. A photo from a hike on Saturday to Killarney.
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  3. Yesterday I found a Pied-Billed Grebe at White Rock Lake in Dallas, Texas.
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  4. Laura - lovely, Gordon B I assume you mean Killarney Il, not Killarney Eire? Trees just command so much respect - how has this one survived? Wood near the Afon Scethin.
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  5. John, Killarney, Ontario, Canada.
     
  6. Big Buck Enjoying Milkweed Cotton
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  7. I discovered a few more patches of Archaea at the wetlands, the formations so small that only the excreted salt spikes could be seen.
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  8. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Great egret
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  9. Signs of Autumn.
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  10. Remembering summer...
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  11. Sugar Creek near the Narrows Bridge in Parke County, Indiana.
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  12. [​IMG]I went apple picking yesterday with a group of friends in Rougemont Quebec which is home to quite a large Apple juice plant.
    The day was very rainy but when we got there, the rain miraculously ceased but it remained solidly overcast. We filled our bags while munching on fresh, crisp apples.
    The rain and wind caused some apples to fall to the ground and that is what you see in the background.
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  13. Looks like a piper of sorts (Numenius tahitiensis).....at Moss Landing lagoon.


    Les
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  14. Moon at sunrise
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  15. Sometimes the surprises are hidden in plain sight, by pretending to be someone else - until you get a really close look :)
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  16. I found this Palm Warbler feeding in the thicket in Brooklyn last week.
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  17. Taken a few years ago. Some kind of fungi, I'm sure Laura can help out.
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  18. Bill, it's an Amanita, but without further details I can't tell you the species. It's a handsome in there with all the oak leaves.
     
  19. David Stephens, I am constantly amazed at your wildlife images. :)
    Went to MA's Mount Auburn Cemetery this weekend. Saw this interesting tree stump. Do you see a "Doughboy", an owl, or ... resting comfortably?
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  20. Hope I'm not too late. Found these mushrooms growing on the side of an old tree stump in a local park. Seem to be growing in every hole or large crack.
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  21. Mary, I see a hung over cabbage patch doll, or maybe just too many mushrooms. It's wondering, "woooow, how did I get here.....where am I? ;-)) Marjorie Trash Heap (remember Fragel Rock?) came to mind, but I think she'd come to in a compost pile, and she'd know how to get home.
    Gordon and John, thank you for your compliments. They are always special to me.
    Jim, no, not too late at all. This is the time of year for many Mycenoid mushrooms to take over just about every log in the forest.
    Tony, Mmmmmmmmmmmmmm.....oh so yummy! Your image is reminiscent of the fruit's wild and distant origins in the mountains of central Asia.
     
  22. Seal in "bathtub".
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  23. A bit of subdued fall color, here a hedge in Wickford, RI.
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  24. A scenic overlook toward Laurel Hill State Park in Southwestern PA - the Western PA Conservancy protected the land (an old farm) a few years ago.
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  25. A glossy ibis working on a lobster lunch. Taken earlier this year, at Cosumnes River Conservancy.
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  26. Mary, I see a hung over cabbage patch doll, or maybe just too many mushrooms. It's wondering, "woooow, how did I get here.....where am I? ;-)) Marjorie Trash Heap (remember Fragel Rock?) came to mind, but I think she'd come to in a compost pile, and she'd know how to get home.​
    Haha, do you think she gets up and walks around at night? Laura, the cemetery has a gate, and I really don't want to be locked inside overnight to find out the truth. - Now we are getting silly. ;-)
     
  27. Mary, isn't that what high ISO and a long lens are for? Levity is good.
     
  28. Mary Doo said:
    David Stephens, I am constantly amazed at your wildlife images. :)
    Went to MA's Mount Auburn Cemetery this weekend. Saw this interesting tree stump. Do you see a "Doughboy", an owl, or ... resting comfortably?​
    Thank you Mary. It's a great joy in my life.
    Your stump looks, to me, a bit like a giant turtle eating a platypus. ;-)
     

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