Mirrorless Monday, September 11, 2017

Discussion in 'Mirrorless Digital Cameras' started by Sanford, Sep 10, 2017.

  1. Scuba Divers
    Monterey Bay 17d_Scuba Divers_2.jpg
     
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  2. The altar, St Michael's church Up Marden (Panny GX-7, Zuiko 9-18) altar2.jpg
     
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  3. Stitched B&W panorama from my Sunday drive around the Eastern Townships country, QC
    MCXT1657-Panorama.jpg
     
  4. MCXT1676.jpg The old mill
     
  5. Untitled-1.jpg Pictures taken on sunday trip, with my new X-T2 : FUJI0105.JPG
     
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  6. [​IMG]
    Toronto waterfront.
     
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  7. Toronto streets
    [​IMG]
     
  8. FUJI0187.JPG Image upload work different on Nikon forum...
     
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  9. unkind mankind
    MCXT1685.jpg
     
  10. Siza, one of my favourite kids. 999_mirr.jpg
    Nikkor 85/2 on Sony A7
     
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  11. Out with the dogs the other day and we came across this pink lady.
    Ricoh GRD iv
    R0010897SQ.jpg
     
  12. Camera JPEG. I'm a bit annoyed that I overexposed this. My kingdom for 1/3 of a stop less? ;-) Still, shooting JPEGs is liberating, for b&w anyway. You just edit and publish. Just like with slides. Of course it helps to get your exposure correct!

    Rehearsal

    KDG05166_Duffy.jpeg

    Sony NEX​
     
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  13. Last edited: Sep 11, 2017
  14. Mukul, The Decisive moment!
     
  15. DSCF6382_Rode kruis.jpg
    X-Pro1 27 mm
     
  16. akocurek and Karim Ghantous like this.
  17. Nice shot, but don't understand what's liberating about in-camera JPEG. With RAW, you just "edit and publish" also. Also, if you're shooting digital, you not getting near as much data as possible for the file, because you're shooting for final exposure. If you expose to the right, you'll gain more data and dynamic range.
     
  18. True - you also get a cleaner and sharper image with RAW, even at base ISO. However, when shooting JPEG, you don't need the RAW converter. In fact you can just give the recipient the SD card and tell them to pick the frames they like. They don't have to know anything about RAW converters, and you don't have to worry that they're using the wrong one.

    The camera sometimes adds a texture to the image, mainly in b&w, that is sometimes attractive. I compared the b&w JPEG output of my main camera to desaturated RAW, and I slightly preferred the JPEGs. I do shoot RAWs as back-ups if I think I'll need them.

    Sports photographers use JPEGs a lot - in fact some shoot JPEGs exclusively. You have to not only get your exposure right, but your WB as well.
     

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