Man Discovers Comet with Canon 350D

Discussion in 'News' started by wigwam jones, Apr 1, 2007.

  1. http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,262782,00.html

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17872359/

    Unless this is a rather elaborate April Fool's Joke being perpetrated on the
    news networks, an Australian named Terry Lovejoy of Thornlands, Queensland,
    Australia, discovered a 9th magnitude comet (whatever that is) with the aid of
    his Canon 350D and zoom lens set to 200mm f/2.8. The comet is named for the
    photographer - Comet Lovejoy.

    Cool stuff, and Good on ye, Terry.
     
  2. I highly suspect that this is indeed an April's fool joke!
     
  3. No hoax, it has been observed independently and an ephemeris is now available from the <a href="http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/mpec/K07/K07F32.html"> IAU's Minor Planet Center.<a>
     
  4. If it's a hoax the major news associations have been fooled as well. Read the article on Yahoo News this morning. As long as we don't have any 5D's finding Bigfoot or D200's sighting Elvis I guress it's legit.
     
  5. If it's a hoax the major news associations have been fooled as well. Read the article on Yahoo News this morning. As long as we don't have any 5D's finding Bigfoot or D200's sighting Elvis I guess it's legit.
     
  6. It would have to be the lamest April Fools joke in history. Comets are discovered by amateurs all the time. Most of them are, in fact, and using modest equipment. Big observatories don't have the time or the interest.
     
  7. Sorry, editing problem. Second sentence should have read "Most of them, in fact, using modest equipment." Big observatories do discover a lot (I'm sure most) comets, but it's not a priority for many of them and there are a lot of amateurs out there.
     
  8. Sounds legit, as it would be too silly to make an April Fool's joke like this. And just to clarify: A 9th Magnitude object should be very dim, as the dimmer stars in the Little Dipper are 7th or 6th Magnitude, and most of us can barely see those. Like F-stops, the smaller the number, the brighter it is. I may be mistaken, but I think the sun is around -22nd Magnitude.
     
  9. In case anyone was still wondering about star magnitude, here's a link to explain it:


    http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/icq/MagScale.html
     

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