Mamiya 645 lens compatibility with AF bodies

Discussion in 'Medium Format' started by alpshiker, Apr 16, 2005.

  1. Do the new 645 bodies (AF and ZD) accept non-AF lenses, still allowing
    auto exposure? Any difference in older and "N" models in this regard?
     
  2. http://www.photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=00BSMn
     
  3. Older M645 lenses (i.e.) "N" etc. will work on the 645AF, the Mamiya 645 AF Mount is Compatible with the M645 mount lenses (manual focus confirmation, focus aid, stop-down exposure metering) just NO Auto Focus.

    See http://mamiya.com for additional info.
     
  4. Read in that other post: "This also means that you have to focus wide open, and then close the diaphragm and take the exposure reading. Is not as handy as the with AF lenses, but you will get used to it rather quickly."

    Hmmm! If I get it right, there is no reading at full opening. No very handy for handheld and candid shots...

    Thanks for the feedback!
     
  5. I bought a 645M 2x teleconverter (on ebay), and found that it would not work, at all, on the 645afd.

    But the two manual lenses I have do work fine.

    Michael McNulty
     
  6. I'm pretty sure that that post was referring to "Stop Down" metering where you have
    to stop the aperture down to the one you are using to meter with since the camera
    doesn't know what f-stop the lens is set to, it just meters off what it "sees". Normally,
    the camera knows the f-stop, and takes that into account when it meters so the lens
    stays wide open for better focusing, then stops down to the selected f-stop as the
    shot is taken. If you're shooting wide open, then you don't have to stop down.
     
  7. What I have found that using older manual lenses with my AF is that the camera meter is not as accurate and under exposes.
    Also night photography using the self timer is a no-no as the camera will not expose for longer than 4 seconds on ae call Mamiya about this, No help there!
    So using manual lenses with the AF can be slow and a little frustrating with more to think about before you shoot.
     

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