Loud camera - Advice needed

Discussion in 'Wedding and Event' started by dmitriy_babichenko, Nov 17, 2008.

  1. I shoot weddings and bar mitzvahs with a 5D and a 40D. I've never had complaints about the shutter noise of my
    cameras until about 2 months ago. I photographed a wedding and a bar mitzvah where the priest and the rabbi
    (respectively) complained about the noise of my 5D (clicking of the shutter and mirror slap). This Saturday I
    was stuck in the back of the church next to the videographer and he complained that my 40D shutter noise
    interfears with his audio recording.

    Since I cannot justify buying a digital rangefinder, I was thinking about picking up a Canon Rebel XSi (450D) - I
    heard that they are much quieter than their bigger brothers. Has anyone used 450D for professional wedding work?
    How's low light performance?
     
  2. The 40D has a silent mode buried in the menus. You have to use live view so it's probably in a menu related to that. You should familiarize yourself with live view shooting as you have to activate AF and even then you have to use the AF button on the back of the camera. I have not used this (silent mode) so I can't really tell you if it's worth trying or not.

    Don't know about the XSi, but my personal experience is the XTi is quieter than the 40D. It's got a different mechanism to work the mirror. The 40D's is superior in the frames per second department, just in case your wondering "why'd they do that".

    Dan
     
  3. Dmitriy, the "noise" I'd worry about most in going to a cheaper Canon would be the digital picture noise at higher ISO shooting, necessary for indoors at churches. For that, you'd want the better noise performance of the 5D I'm sure.

    I do wish they'd make these mirrors / shutters quieter in these cameras. Surely they could put in some damping or cushioning to quiet that click/clack noise.
     
  4. I feel your pain, this is one area that i just don't understand. The quietest shuuter that i've experienced to date is the Canon 10D and is the very reason i've chosen to keep this body. I have the 1DMIIN's and they are LOUD (Even with the quite shutter option in personal settings) and is why during most ceremony's anymore i've got the 10D mounted to a tripod with a cable release shooting at around 800. From what i'm hearning from reviews of the 5DMII, it appears as if they've addressed the shutter noise to some degree.
     
  5. Dmitry, These little XSi cameras don't get enough respect. I have one and carry it a lot instead of my 40D. Shutter is a bit quieter but image quality is just about as good. Here is a little video of the XSi shutter noise and there is a comparison 40D as well. The last Jewish wedding I photographed the Rabbi would not let any pictures be taken during the ceremony. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xw5UUANAHOM Good luck!
     
  6. Muzzle it. You could look at camera blimps or other similar devices like this... That way you can keep your 5D.
     
  7. and whatever advice you get from everybody else: IGNORE the VIDEOGRAPHER!!

    Speaking as a videographer, if that guy is using ambient sound for his video, and depending on it primarily, shame on him!
    He's not worth what he's charging. Click away!!
     
  8. Regarding shutter noise/feel/user experience, I have to say that the Nikons blow Canon out of the water. Boy oh boy is Canon rubish in this regard. At Fotokina this year I fondled a few Nikons, and the shutter "feel" is excellent. My 350D shutter is loud and cheap sounding, but that camera still (as it always did) produces stunning images. When I got my 5D I was initially very impressed by the more solid and quieter shutter sound, but in m opinion Nikon rules in this department.
     
  9. I agree about the video, that guy had better have remote microphones on the groom and officiant.

    You also might try a good quality P&S on a tripod such as the Canon G10.
     
  10. yeah, I was thinking that too that the video dude should have been wired into the actual ceremony or they will never hear anything on the video
     
  11. dmitry - the 450D is a step down in terms of high ISO performance, I'm afraid. the 40D is pretty quiet - I'm surprised that you were told to find something quieter!

    ce
     
  12. Some range finder cameras have very quiet shutters, such as Leica's. You can't hear that shutter. Hasselblad's were/are perhaps the worst. In a church Hasselblads sound like a .357 gun going off follow by a very noisy winding crack!

    I think you can get a lot of your images when there is surrounding noise. Singing, people standing, or sitting, people talking, clapping, even a sneeze, babies crying, will completely distract your shutter noise. I've never been asked by anyone to refrain from shooting. Maybe because I use longer lenses and I'm always back a bit from the altar, but not totally in the back of the church/temple/hall whatever.

    I don't want to be noticed. It could be possible that you are the center of attention for some reason and not knowing it, perhaps taking too many shots up close. I've witnessed photographers blasting off 100 to 200 shots during the 20 minute wedding 7 to 10 or even 15 feet away from the action. This is a bit overkill and I, right or wrong, only take about 20 shots at the most and make up the rest after the wedding. Hopefully these ideas will help you at your next wedding by thinking about "Blending in."

    I'm not saying you are doing anything wrong, I'm just commenting on other photographers I've seen make a lot of racket! It is those photographers that have caused so many church and temples to make make and uphold strict, unfair rigid rules. I've seen some brainless photographers actually walk behind the preacher and snap photos over his shoulder with Hassy's. The mike picked up the shutter noise! Somehow the photographer "Lived!" Not sure how... If I were that minister, he would have been band, condemmed from the place forever.
     
  13. Some range finder cameras have very quiet shutters, such as Leica's. You can't hear that shutter. Hasselblad's were/are perhaps the worst. In a church Hasselblads sound like a a car backfiring follow by a very noisy winding crack!

    I think you can get ALL of your images when there is surrounding noise. Singing, people standing, or sitting, people talking, clapping, even a sneeze, babies crying, will completely distract your shutter noise. I've never been asked by anyone to refrain from shooting. Maybe because I use longer lenses and I'm always back a bit from the altar, but not totally in the back of the church/temple/hall whatever.

    I don't want to be noticed. It could be possible that you are the center of attention for some reason and not knowing it, perhaps taking too many shots up close. I've witnessed photographers blasting off 100 to 200 shots during the 20 minute wedding 7 to 10 or even 15 feet away from the action. This is a bit overkill and I, right or wrong, only take about 25 key ceremony shots at the most and make up the rest after the wedding. Hopefully these ideas will help you at your next wedding by thinking about "Blending in."

    I'm not saying you are doing anything wrong, I'm just commenting on other photographers I've seen make a lot of racket! It is those photographers that have caused so many church and temples to make make and uphold strict, unfair rigid rules. I've seen some brainless photographers actually walk behind the preacher and snap photos over his shoulder with Hassy's. The mike picked up the actual shutter noise! Somehow the photographer "Lived!" Not sure how... If I were that minister, he would have been band, condemned, maybe burnt at the stake for wrecking the wedding ceremony.
     
  14. how the heck did that double post - sorry.
     
  15. Always situated far back in the Church --that's the rules around here. Never take more then a dozen pics ....on a tripod. The EOS AE2 has a silent mode ... whisper rewind for sure.
     
  16. That was one of the first things I noticed when I switched from Canon to a Nikon D3/D700 ... much of the noise went away.

    The new Leica M8-2 is the quietest ... quieter than a M6 or M7 ... and has a delayed release ... when you take the shot and
    hold the button down, it doesn't wind on and recock the shutter until you release it. Cost: both arms, one leg, and a kidney.
     
  17. Seems like a nonissue to me. Perhaps a matter of timing (avoid shooting during the quiter, more sacred moments) and frequency of shots, (often, less is more). In more than 500 weddings I've never gotten a complaint about shutter noise.
     
  18. I've never had a complaint about shutter noise either. I think the videographer you were next to has no idea what he was doing.....he should have wireless mics on the bride, groom and officiant, and if he wants to pick up some ambient noise, he shouldn't be using the microphone on his camera. As others have said, don't be outright rude to a videographer, but don't let them stop you from getting your shot either.

    I like the suggestion of using the G9 or G10 to grab some shots during the prayer or other very quiet sacred moments, but I usually just trust my gut on when to sit tight and be quiet, for example during the last wedding I shot when they had a moment of silence for the father of the bride, whom had died just a couple months prior to the wedding.

    If you're hanging back a bit from the altar, it shouldn't be a problem. As Bob said, you may be attracting attention not through your shutter noise but by your motion or something else.

    I wouldn't get the Rebel for the sole purpose of a quieter shutter-compared to the 5D you won't be nearly as happy with the images. If you do want to muffle your shutter, I would go with some of the body armor, or even just taking a towel to throw over the top for the ceremony.
     
  19. Ladies and Gentlemen,

    Thank you very much for your responses and suggestions. The thing is, I've been shooting weddings for 10years, and never had an issue with not being discreet. The reason I posted this question here was because three people commented on the shutter noise of my cameras. For the record, in all cases I was shooting from the back of the church/temple, in the church I was using a 300mm 2.8 lens (it was an incredibly large Gothic church) and a 70-200 f4 in the synagogue (smaller sanctuary). Normally I wouldn't think of this as an issue, but since several people noticed the shutter noise, I decided to be on the safe side and ask a question on this forum. I think I like the suggestion of getting a G10 - I need a high-end PS camera anyway, and I could use it during those occasions when absolute silence is required. Once again, thank you very much for taking time to address my concern.
     
  20. I wouldn't blast away with a motor drive on a film camera during the ceremony, but short of that I've never heard of (no pun intended) camera noise being an issue at a wedding. In my newspaper days, when they first started letting photographers back into courtrooms camera noise was an issue. One of the requirements was that you used either a Leica (Leicas were actually specified by name and model numbers in court rules in some states) or blimped your SLR. Also an issue in pro golf where the players are hypersensitive to distractions. But if it's just the videographer complaining and not the bride or minister, I wouldn't give it a second thought for weddings. Never heard of anyone blimping a camera or using a Leica for weddings (maybe if they were already a Leica user, but not for noise purposes).
     
  21. "I think I like the suggestion of getting a G10 - I need a high-end PS camera anyway"

    Since you're open to new cameras, give the Panasonic G1 a look. It has no reflex mirror so it should be
    essentially silent in operation. The 4/3 format sensor is just a bit smaller than the APS-C sized one in your
    40D - or (4/3 format) about 6x the imaging area of the Canon G10. I haven't seen any direct comparisons yet, but
    I would expect the G1 to give much cleaner and much higher quality images than the traditional compact digicam.

    Personally, I'm eagerly awaiting the Olympus interpretations of the micro-4/3 camera format. The Panasonic G1,
    for all of its merits, is a conservative DSLR wannabe intended to give its target audience a measure of
    familiarity. As an industrial design, it fails to really capitalize in the inherent advantages of micro-4/3.

    The previews of the Olympus offering, on the other hand, looks much more promising. Unfortunately, it's just so
    much vaporware at this point.
     
  22. Well, the 40D is a bit clicky but not too bad. The 450 is not so great in the high ISO dept, but not bad.

    What about a G10?
     
  23. If you're just looking for a reason to get another camera then any reason is OK.....but I still think shutter noise is a nonissue.
     
  24. One thing you can often test ahead of time is the acoustics of the particular venue or church you're shooting in. There's a local church in my town which is very large, with a balcony. I was concerned about the shutter click of my camera, but when I had a second shooter in the balcony clicking away before the ceremony, I was down in the aisle, about 50 feet from him, and I couldn't hear a thing. It sounded so loud when I was up there with him, though.

    So, take a friend or ask a church fellow to help you check this out ahead of time, and just see for yourself just how loud it is in that venue.

    Beyond that, masking the shutter clicks by shooting during singing, music, or speaking is very effective.
     
  25. I recall a tip for shooting social events where mirror slap is frowned upon but you still need *an* image:
    cough just as you depress the shutter release!
     
  26. Loud shutter? No flash allowed - but your shutter is too loud. Oh please, when will people that take wedding ceremonies realise that the bride and groom and their special day (and the recording of said event) are the most important. Last wedding I took the baby crying was far more distracting.
     
  27. By some earplugs and give them to the whiners.
     
  28. A lot of people don't find the the "recording" of the event is the most important part. So flash, shutter noises, wandering photographers, videographers with dollied tripods or booms moving about, etc., are distracting. Some churches have a crying room, some families are more accepting of crying children (or adults) than they are of un-natural distractions or disturbances. I suppose most if not all of the distractions would be easily solved by moving the photographers to the crying room.
     

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