Light Meter, MR4

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by m._k._hong, Oct 2, 2000.

  1. Hello,

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    I am trying to get an instruction manual for my recent acquirement of MR4(I think) light meter. It has a push button on the top. A dial on the top that you can turn to either the black dot or red dot. On the front, toward the field, there is a lever that slides to the left, and when you let it go, it returns itself( I guess it has a spring tension action). It is operated by a battery.

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    I don't care if it's a photo-copy version. As long as it tells me how to use it.

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    Thank you for your help.
     
  2. I can give you the basic intructions. First, you will need a PX 13
    battery, or some adapter to take a more available alternative. The
    red scale is for lower light readings, the black higher light. To
    mount it on the camera, the shutter speed must be set on B on both
    the camera and meter. Carefully slide it into the shoe while holding
    up the spring loaded shutter coupling nob until it locks in place
    with the shutter speed dial on the camera. Now when you change
    speeds, the meter and camera are reading the same speed.

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    Look through the finder at you subject, and push the black spring
    loaded lever in for a moment and release. The meter will now hold a
    direct reading of the f-stop needed for correct exposure. If you are
    in lower light, set it on red and read the apertures in red, if
    higher light, use the black scale. The meter is a semi spot, so it
    reads about what the 90 lines see in the finder. I love mine for the
    accuracy and speed of use. Many people have scratched their cameras
    with the meters, however. Certainly use a piece of tape on the top
    plate if you are using a mint camera.
     
  3. I forgot to mention that the spring loaded lever next to the red and
    black dot on the top initiates the meter reading. The one
    on the front is a battery test that should send the needle to the
    white dot on the scale.
     

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