Leicaflex SL (1970) info

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by joan_wertz, Apr 9, 2000.

  1. Hello, I hope you can help me! I recently inherited my father's Leicaflex SL. So recently that I haven't even had time to read all the instruction book. There is someone interested in buying it and I realize I don't have enough info to make an educated decision and that is why I am appealing to you. He bought it on a trip to Germany May 1970, its serial # is 1256670, comes with a Summicron 50mm lense & a Elmarit 135mm lense. Has a large case (room for the camera, big lense & a flash). The flash is a Rollei. Dad also has listed 2 UVA filters on his inventory list of what he paid customs. It needs a cleaning, he hadn't used it for years, but I have it first hand, of
    course, that everything was in top working condition, and I know he wouldn't have had it any other way! I guess I need to know if you think it is worth keeping as I would like to use it, or sell it & but a new one. Do you think the old ones are better than the new ones?What would something (if there is anything) comparable cost new? And does it have any value in its current condition?
    I am really confused and since time is a big factor here I have to speed up my education as fast as I can.
    Thank you, Joan
     
  2. The Leicaflex SL is a very good manual exposure camera. You
    do not need to be in a rush to sell as they sell very easily on
    eBay. Search the completed auctions to find a rough idea of what
    current prices are. The camera's modern equivalent would be
    the Leica R6.2 and you can find prices on various camera store
    websites and photo magazine ads (Shutterbug, Popular
    Photograghy, etc). The best thing you could do is buy film, take a
    basic photo course (if you feel you need one) and use the
    camera! The Leica Historical Society of America has a list of
    repair resources on their website: http://www.lhsa.org/ . As it is a
    mechanical camera it does require periodic CLAs and, most
    importantly, regular working of the slow speeds. Any local photo
    repairperson can advise you on the accuracy of the speeds but I
    would recommend only experienced Leica rpsn actually work on
    it. The camera unfortunately takes the now outlawed mercury
    1.35v 625 battery. You can have the camera converted to 1.5v
    batteries or use the new 1.3v zinc-air replacements. As this
    battery only powers the meter it is not that important. The camera
    is not brand new and I have heard of a few with pentaprisms
    with deteriorating silvering. The viewfinder image is increasingly
    yellow and dim as this occurs. The pentaprism can be resilvered
    or replaced. Good luck. A blah blah blah to make sure all of the
    above gets in!
     
  3. Joan

    <p>

    The SL is a very fine camera - probably the finest Leica ever made
    (together with the original Leicaflex and the SL2). The 50mm
    Summicron is a very fine performer. The Elmarit is essentially still
    made today and is a fine portrait lens. If you are interested in
    photography at all I would keep them as they just do not make cameras
    like this today - it fits virtually all current Leica-R lenses, which
    are (arguably) the finest set of reflex 35mm lenses, optically
    speaking, in existance.

    <p>

    The SL was popular and a lot of them were made, also the reflexes are
    not nearly so much in demand by collectors as the rangefinder Leicas.
    As result the SL is not worth a great deal by Leica standards - I
    suggest $300-400. The Summicron is worth about $250+ I would say as
    again they are reasonably common. The Elmarit is also probably about
    the same, may be a bit more. The current camera model equivalent is
    the R6.2 which is $1400 or so second hand. The only real disadvantage
    of the SL is that its meter is not very sensitive in low light. The
    next model the SL2 reectified this and this one is very sought after
    costing about the same at the R6.2.

    <p>

    You have a marvellous camera with a screen that is still better than
    the R6.2 in terms of brightness in my opinion. Is it 'better' than
    the R6.2 - not really as the R6 has a more useful meter, but I still
    have my SL and use it as a second camera all the time. After all a
    camera is 'just' a box to hold a lens so the Leicaflex is a beautiful
    box that will last for years with no attention. It does lack all the
    electronic everything that most modern cameras have, but in my case
    this increases its value to a keen phptographer. If you are
    interested in photography I would keep and treasure it. If not, try
    and get it to a good home. You need to speak to a knowleadgable
    photographer who knows something about cameras, otherwise there will
    be balnk incomprehension from the average Canon/Nikon etc owner.
     
  4. Joan

    <p>

    The SL is a very fine camera - probably the finest Leica ever made
    (together with the original Leicaflex and the SL2). The 50mm
    Summicron is a very fine performer. The Elmarit is essentially still
    made today and is a fine portrait lens. If you are interested in
    photography at all I would keep them as they just do not make cameras
    like this today - it fits virtually all current Leica-R lenses, which
    are (arguably) the finest set of reflex 35mm lenses, optically
    speaking, in existance.

    <p>

    The SL was popular and a lot of them were made, also the reflexes are
    not nearly so much in demand by collectors as the rangefinder Leicas.
    As result the SL is not worth a great deal by Leica standards - I
    suggest $300-400. The Summicron is worth about $250+ I would say as
    again they are reasonably common. The Elmarit is also probably about
    the same, maybe a bit more. The current camera model equivalent is
    the R6.2 which is $1400 or so second hand. The only real disadvantage
    of the SL is that its meter is not very sensitive in low light. The
    next model, the SL2, rectified this and this one is very sought after
    costing about the same at the R6.2.

    <p>

    You have a marvellous camera with a screen that is still better than
    the R6.2 in terms of brightness in my opinion. Is it 'better' than
    the R6.2 - not really as the R6 has a more useful meter, but I still
    have my SL and use it as a second camera all the time. After all a
    camera is 'just' a box to hold a lens so the Leicaflex is a beautiful
    box that will last for years with no attention. It does lack all the
    electronic everything that most modern cameras have, but in my case
    this increases its value to a keen phptographer. If you are
    interested in photography I would keep and treasure it. If not, try
    and get it to a good home. You need to speak to a knowleadgable
    photographer who knows something about cameras, otherwise there will
    be blank incomprehension from the average Canon/Nikon etc owner.
     
  5. By all means, keep it. I own four SLs and can say that they are built
    like a tank but with the precision of a fine watch. To add to what has
    already been said, the SL has a spot meter and will also meter between
    speeds. In other words, you can shoot between the speeds listed on the
    shutter speed dial(well, most of them). This camera also has a
    dampened mirror to reduce mirror shake.
     

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