Leaving unwound film in camera for 3 years

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by johncarvill, Apr 6, 2010.

  1. HI folks
    I'm wondering whether leaving an unwound film in my Nikon SLR for a few years will have damaged the camera.
    I have a Nikon F3 which I haven't used in a while, due to being busy with family, kids, etc. I recently discovered that I had left a used, unwound 36 shot roll of slide film in the camera, it's been in there since about October 2006! I have now rewound the film and removed it, and everything looks ok, but I am worried the stress of holding the film in place for so long may have damaged my camera. Is this something I should be worried about? Or no problem?
    Thanks
    JC
     
  2. The film isn't spring loaded, nor does it exert any tension on any of the film transport components. The F3 film transport was designed to withstand prolonged use with a high speed motordrive - your film won't do it any harm at all.
     
  3. :)...There wont be any stress on the film holder in the camera, so you dont have to worry. It is as if you used the camera regularly for 3 years. as long as there is not deposits of film or precipitation, i should be ok.
    Even if the camera gets damaged, will it make a difference. It should not matter as you are not using the camera anyway. joke ok...
     
  4. Ha ha. Yes, why worry if I'm not using it eh? :)
    Actually, I'm off to New York in May and planning to shoot several rolls of Velvia.
    Thanks for the reassurance folks.
    Cheers
    JC
     
  5. Nah, no problems. The folks on the Classic Manual Cameras Forum have found much older film in much older cameras. Both cameras and film survived. My personal record for neglected film loaded into a camera is around three years - no problems with the film or camera.
     
  6. no worries there. i had films in my F3 and FE2 when i immigrated here to the states. started using the FE2 and forgot about the F3. five years later, surprised that there was a film in the F3, started shooting. no problem, even with change in climate and atmosphere.
     

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