Latest with the E-M1 Mark II and 12-100mm f4 M. Zuiko

Discussion in 'Olympus' started by Greg M, Nov 10, 2017.

  1. Panasonic 12-60 is on it's way to me :)
     
  2. Great! Good luck! :)
     
  3. It arrived.
    Now I can shoot. :)
     
    Mary Doo likes this.
  4. Congrats Gary. Tell us how you like it.
     
  5. Just for giggles, the E-M1 + 12-60 on the left, and D7200 + 18-140 on the right.
    According to the specs, the Olympus is 44% lighter than the Nikon.

    camera comp EM1 vs D7200.jpg
     
  6. The original E-M1 is a nicely compact professional grade mirrorless camera. The E-M1 Mark II and 12-100 M. Zuiko, which is a little closer to the comparable coverage of the 18-140 Nikkor on the D7200, brings the two setups closer as the Mark II E-M1 has a little more heft/grip to it compared to the original E-M1. When I revert back to the 12-40mm f2.8 M. Zuiko after using the 12-100 M. Zuiko for a few days or weeks, the 12-40 feels like going back to a compact lens, but then you have to also consider, when I use the 12-100 I'm basically replacing two lenses with it, both the 12-40 and 40-150mm f2.8's since the 12-100 range is probably where I am at 85-90% (if not more) of the time anyway with the two f2.8's. Might as well have access to it through one nice lens.
     
  7. Greg,

    I plan to get the 12-100 next year, when I get a new "toy" budget.
    I came to really like the coverage range of the 18-140, and the 12-100 is even better with a wider short end, and a constant f/4. I would have loved a f/2.8, but not the added bulk and weight. I thought about the 12-40 f/2.8, but compared to the 12-100, why? As you said the 12-100 replaces two lenses, and no lens changing. I'll take the 1 f-stop hit for a more flexible lens.

    With the E-M1, I realized that I want what seems like duplicate/overlapping lenses. Each of the 3 lenses fits a different need that the others can't fit.
    • The compact 14-42EZ pancake lens. For when I want to be as compact as I can.
    • The small 12-60. For an easy carry around GP lens, with an extra 2mm on the wide end and a bit more reach than the 14-42..
    • The 12-100. For more specialized shooting when I don't mind the extra bulk and weight. Faster and longer reach, with better image quality than the 12-60. This would be a great field sport lens, and I can't wait to get it onto the field.
    I still have to figure out my FAST prime; 17, 20 or 25. I'm leaning to the 17.
     
  8. The first trip I took the 12-100 with the E-M1 Mark II was for a few days to White Sands National Monument in New Mexico, which was the PERFECT trip for the 12-100. Few lens changes in what is often high wind/sandy conditions in the mid-to late afternoons. The two lenses I used in conjunction was the 7-14mm f2.8 for the really wide compositions, and the 25mm f1.2 M. Zuiko for when I wanted to use a more shallow depth of field.

    White Sands National Monument- 2017 - Greg

    BTW, the Olympus dust-reduction system works a charm. I've been to White Sands now four times with Olympus systems, three of those mirrorless, and have never had an issue with sensor dust despite a few lens changes in less than desirable conditions. If one is going to have sensor dust issues anywhere, it's there.

    I also used the 12-100 for most of the second-half of a trip to a ranch and canyonlands in West Texas in the Fall..

    Pole Canyon Ranch, 2017 - Greg

    Given the choice of all three f1.2's at once the 17 is probably where I would lean as well. The 25 was the only one available when I picked it up.
     
  9. Greg and Mary,

    About how much time/use will I get out of a battery on the EM1-mk1?
    IOW how many batteries should I plan for during a day of vacation shooting?
    I think I will need at least 2, but will I need 3?

    I am tentatively planning for 2, with a 3rd as backup, in case I have charging problems where I only get 1 battery charged.
    That would make the next day tough, to charge 3 batteries :( Dang, that means I may need a 2nd charger also.
     
  10. It depends on how much you shoot too. Yes, it is safe to have two then a 3rd as backup. I believe that's what I did. Now that I use the Mark II more and the battery has a higher capacity, I still have 3 batteries with me. But truthfully I hardly ever needed to use more than one in a day - but I wasn't shooting non-stop either. I always feel safer to have 3 batteries with me.
     
  11. I have 4 Olympus-brand batteries that are numbered and I use in rotation. The reality of a days shooting is, one will last most of a day, so if I had no ability to re-charge, I am thinking the four batteries would last me a good 3-4 days and heavy shooting. A lot will depend on how you have your camera set up, how much chimping you do, etc.

    A few images from this past weekend with the 12-100mm f4..

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    and the 8mm f1.8 Fisheye, slightly cropped.

    [​IMG]
     
    Gary Naka likes this.
  12. Thanks Mary and Greg,
    It will be a train trip from Banff to Vacouver then south to San Jose,CA, so I suspect a fair amount of shooting in Canada on the train. Then again, maybe not as much as I am thinking I might.
    But I can't figure out how to simulate the possible shooting volume over the course of a day.
    The camera is still new to me, and I have not yet shot the camera enough to have a feel for how the EM1-mk1 drains the battery.
    But it sounds like 1 + part of the 2nd would take me through the day.
     
  13. Consider whether or not using the “economy” setting where the camera will go to sleep faster between shots to better conserve battery power is a practical setting for you.
     
  14. Sounds about right if you are not continuously shooting. But make sure you have the fully charged backups - the route you are taking has awesome views along the way.
     
  15. A few Architectural abstracts with the E-M1 II and 12-100mm f4..

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    Gary Naka likes this.
  16. Some black & white conversions, using the new Adpbe Monochrome profile, and a little color channel and contrast tweeks to taste, with the E-M1 Mark II..

    7-14mm f2.8 M. Zuiko..

    [​IMG]

    12-100 f4 M. Zuiko, and FL900R flash, using a Demb bounce modifier..

    [​IMG]

    With the 7-14mm f2.8 M. Zuiko..

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    12-100mm f4 M. Zuiko..

    [​IMG]
     
    Gary Naka likes this.
  17. Greg
    You are being bad, teasing me with those ultra-wide shots.
    I must resist . . .
     
  18. LOL, the 7-14mm f2.8 M. Zuiko is quite nice, but does suffer from quite extensive field curvature. For most all landscapes, I focus the lens relatively closely. Depth of field stretches to infinity pretty quickly and needs to. If you focus close to, or at infinity, the corners, especially up closer, suffer. I focused the image below on the box with the graffiti up close in the image bottom-center. Stopped down to f8 the lens is easily sharp to infinity at 8mm.

    [​IMG]
     
    Gary Naka likes this.
  19. Couple of other 7-14mm f2.8 shots from White Sands National Monument..

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    Gary Naka and Vincent Peri like this.
  20. Gary, if you are going to get an ultra-wide, I suggest the Panasonic 8-18mm instead of the Olympus 7-14. I just swapped out my 7-14 to get it. An important reason for the swap is that the 8-18 can take a polarizering filter easily like anyone else. This ability is crucial for landscape photography.
     
    Gary Naka likes this.

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