Kodak Portra 160 - how to set ISO

Discussion in 'Film and Processing' started by per_pettersen, Mar 28, 2008.

  1. Dear friends,

    I'm thinking about trying the Kodak Portra 160 film (35 mm). Can anybody here
    recommend that film? I'll probably go for the VC version.

    Another question: How do I set the ISO value, 160, on my old Nikon FE2? I'll
    have to choose between ISO 100 and 200.
     
  2. According to this website:

    http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/nikonfeseries/fe2/basic3.htm

    there should be two marks between the "100" and "200" speed indicators; you would want to set your camera's dial to the one right before the "200."

    I personally would set the camera to either the "125" or "100" mark, though, as I tend to like to slightly overexpose negative film.

    I haven't shot any Portra 160 in a long while, but the last time I did (somewhere around mid-2002), it was a spectacular film. I used the VC version and found it to be crisp and punchy. I've heard it's gotten even better since then.
     
  3. Thanks, Alex, I wasn't aware of that possibility!
     
  4. I had a similar issue but it was with 64 ISO film... There are two marks between 50 and 100 and wasn't sure which one it was. Fyi, there are 64 and 80 between the 50 and 100.
     
  5. I tend to overexpose Portra 160 by 2/3 to 1 stop and then pull -1/3 in development. That
    gives me some more shadow detail and the highlights still hold. If this sounds over your
    head, shoot at 100 ASA, it's one of the best films ever. best, M
     
  6. You might also want to try Fujifilm Fujicolor NPS 160. I use the 4x5 sheet film but I believe it's also available in 35mm. As others have suggested for the Kodak Portra, rate it at 100 ISO. I find it indispensible in those situations where transparency film doesn't have the latitude required to capture the moment.
     
  7. If you set it at 160, you will be fine. You just have to know how to meter. If you don't know how to meter, set it lower to cover your butt, then go learn how to use a reflected light meter.

    Keith
     

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