Jupiter-9 - I've got bubbles in my glass!

Discussion in 'Classic Manual Cameras' started by ben_johnson|3, Dec 15, 2004.

  1. One of those parcels arrived yesterday from the Ukraine - you know
    the kind, covered in indecipherable scrawl that makes customs
    inspectors run the other way.

    Anyway, I unwrapped my 1960 Kiev 4A with a Jupiter-8M, an 85mm
    finder, and a lovely silver 1960 Jupiter-9 (85/2) in Kiev/Contax
    mount.

    But peering through the J-9, I notice bubbles in the glass of one of
    the rearward elements! They're about 1mm in width, and there are
    about 3 of them. I haven't shot a roll through the camera yet (I've
    actually mounted the lens on a 1960 Kiev 4 while i overhaul the 4A),
    so I don't know the implications of these bubbles.

    Has anyone seen this before?
     
  2. Bubbles were apparently reasonably common in pre-war Zeiss lenses, and
    were not supposed to affect the image quality.
     
  3. Would that be the "Champagne Edition"? :>
     
  4. Bubbles are also not unusual in post-WWII E. German Carl Zeiss Jena lenses. Don't sweat them; they were once an indicator of high quality (see page 17, http://www.zeisscamera.com/Library/TenLens1620.htm)
     
  5. The highest quality optical glass at molten temperatures is very caustic. In order to get the bubbles completely out, you need to heat it for a very long time. Before the 1970's, the caustic glass would destroy the crucibles used to melt the glass before the bubbles could be completely eliminated. If you're new to Contax/Kiev, welcome to the club! Don't be surprised if that camera and lenses need some tinkering to reach their full potential.
    00ASRJ-20932784.jpg
     
  6. Thanks for the technical explanation, Mike. I always figured it had something to do w/the heating/cooling process, but didn't know the specifics.
     
  7. Exotic optical glass requires carefull really controlled cooling. The maximum cooling rate varies with the temperature. It can be much quicker in some zones; and snails paced in narrow zones. If cooled too quick; the glass melt quality is radically reduced; and can have built in stresses; break; or have other problems. for a giant lens blank or mirror; this is a huge process.
     
  8. One of Nikon's claim to fame in the '50s was that, unilke the best German and American optical glass, theirs didn't have bubbles. It lent credince to the stories that maybe they did know something about high quality after all.
     
  9. Yes, Nikon invented a new crucible formula that eliminated all the glass bubbles.
     
  10. I successfully used Polish enlarging lenses (Amar, Matar) which had bubbles. Don't worry to much, but be twice as proud about the results.
     
  11. Daniel - I like the "Champagne Edition" moniker. That's how I'll think of my vintage glass from now on.

    Robert
     
  12. Anyone seen Finding Nemo? - BUBBLES! BUBBLES BUBBLES BUBBLES BUBBLES BUBBLES BUBBLES BUBBLES BUBBLES BUBBLES BUBBLES BUBBLES BUBBLES BUBBLES BUBBLES BUBBLES BUBBLES
    MY BUBBLES!
     
  13. Then there's the West Ham song "I'm forever blowing bubbles...". Rubbish team, nice song but.

    Don't worry about the bubbles, Ben. They add a bit of quality.
     
  14. TINY BUBBLES
    Tiny Bubbles,in the wine
    makes me happy, makes me feel fine
    tiny bubbles, makes me warm all over
    with a feelin that I'm gonna
    love you till the end of time
     
  15. This question went places I never imagined! Thanks, all. I'll post a shot or two when I get my test roll developed.
     
  16. As Mike (The Poet) said: Bubbles are always good and the security you have not a plastic lens.

    Well done Mike.
     
  17. As Mike,The Poet said: Bubbles are always good and the security you have not a plastic lens.

    Well done Mike.
     

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