Is D610 with 2 oil spots from the beginning normal?

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by jason_min, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. I bought D610 last week expecting the oil spot problem is gone. Previously, I purchased D600 but returned to the vendor due to too many oil spots with the photo taken with f16 against the sky.
    I tested the new D610 just in case for the oil spot on the day I received it. It is within 100 shutter count that I took the sky with f16 to check for any oil spot. Much to my surprise and disappointment, I found 2 oil spot on the upper left corner and top mid area. I am not sure if the oil spots will show more as I take more pictures.
    I see one post in B&H D610 comment section that one reviewer posted the D610 photo with an oil spot.
    My question is that if this is normal for the D610 to have 2 oil spots from the beginning even though Nikon says they fixed the oil spot problem in D610. Or it my unit a defective one so I need to have this exchanged?
    Could the D610 owners please make comments on this?

    Thank you very much.
     
  2. It might be more appropriate to say that all DSLRs are going to get and show some dust and other contaminants on their sensors. Cleaning those sensors is a normal part of using such a camera, especially if you routinely shoot stopped that far down against bright fields like the sky.

    It might make more sense for you to use your usual wet cleaning method (are you sure, by the way, that you're looking at oil, and not dust?), confirm with similar photographs that you've got it clean, and then use the camera for a bit longer to see where you really stand.
     
  3. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    As long as you are shooting a uniform sky at f16, very few DSLR is going to be completely clean with that kind of testing. I would get a wet cleaning kit and clean the sensor yourself.
    I recently bought a new bottle of the Eclipse cleaning fluid for my D800E and D700. I have been using the D700 to capture images of the Df and lens I am testing. To gain depth of field, I am using f16 on my 60mm macro and my D700's sensor is not that clean even after wet cleaning.
    Unless you still get "serious" oil/dust issues after a few thousand captures, I wouldn't worry about it. It is quite obvious that Nikon replaced the D600 with the D610 using a different shutter mainly to resolve the oil issue (or at least get rid of the negative publicity associated with that model).
     
  4. Thank you for the encouraging reply. I might be a little bit paranoid about the oil spot because I got burned by the D600 purchase with numerous oil spots and had to go thru return procedure.
    I am new to cleaning the sensor with wet clean or other brush since I am afraid that I might make it worse. I used the Rocket Blower before, though.
    If all other new D610 has some oil spots from the beginning, then mine is normal and I will keep. But if not, I am thinking that I might have a bad one.
    Thank you.
     
  5. Definitely get over your concerns about cleaning the sensor. A little bit of care and the right solvent/swabs, and you're in business. I've finally had reason to clean my D600 (shooting stopped-down video against the snow was the final straw!), and it took me three swabs to get it completely, 100% clean. Used it all day a week later, changing lenses many times in a very dirty environment, and though I did pick up a couple more dust specs, those came away using only the camera's built-in cleaning feature. But I'll use a wet cleaning as often as I feel the need, and have no worries at all about doing so.
     
  6. There is no reason that a brand new Nikon camera should have oil spots. While, over time, dust and other substances/debris can make their way onto the sensor, oil from the shutter mechanism should not be one of them. Since the camera is brand new, you have some options available to you at this time.
     
  7. I wonder if this was ever an issue with film cameras and nobody ever noticed. It could have happened and then the "sensor" is replaced with a brand new, clean one.
     
  8. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    I wonder if this was ever an issue with film cameras and nobody ever noticed. It could have happened and then the "sensor" is replaced with a brand new, clean one.​
    The difference is that with film cameras, the "sensor," i.e. each frame of film, is replaced after each frame. (In case you use multiple exposure, you could use the same frame a few times, but certainly not many times.)
    Back in 1999, on a trip to the Utah National Parks, there was some lint stuck around the top of the shutter on my F5 body. As a result, for that entire trip, there is a shadow of that piece of lint on every frame I captured with that camera, although it moved around a bit from frame to frame. Of course I was not aware of the problem at all until I got home and had my slide film developed. I immediately cleaned my F5, but that was already too late for the images from that trip.
     
  9. I think with the film camera, the sensor is in effect the 35mm film itself, and it changes with every shot. So, if there is any oil or speck, I think it is on that flim frame unlike the digital camera sensor.
     
  10. Is the OP sure it's oil spots or is it just regular sensor dust?
     
  11. I think if it is dust spot, it would look darker and more clearly defined. I showed it to the vendor product specialist the same photo, and he acknowledged it as oil spot and suggested for product return for swap. Thank you for your comment.
     
  12. I just took a similar image on my D800 with my 90/3.5 CF at f/16 (your image was 85mm at f/16) and the few dust spots look very similar to yours - not clearly defined at all. I wouldn't jump to conclusions that it's oil - it looks very much like typical dust to me. Like I said, I recommend getting a sensor loupe and look at it before you return the camera.
     
  13. 25K images on my D300 and maybe one or two dust spots last time I checked. Worry less shoot more. My old Graflex RB had nice dust deposit inside yet it still took great images.
     
  14. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    BTW, it looks like the OP also posted this question to DPReview: http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3606851
    I am sure that just like another other camera model, there are defective D610 out there, but I would suggest the OP to clean his sensor a few times and wait for more actuations. This is a new camera with a new warranty, so there will still be plenty of opportunities to send it in for repair should that be necessary.
     
  15. Shun Cheung, what is OP? I do not understand what OP means.
    Yes, I posted the same q to another forum for 2 reasons. I did not expect this many answers and want to hear what people say about oil spot on d610.
    Thank you.
     
  16. OP: original poster (originator of the thread).
    I for one will welcome the Nikon D620.
     
  17. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    what is OP? I do not understand what OP means.​
    OP stand for outrageous person; i.e. people who make crazy claims. :)
    Just kidding. As Michael Chuang points out, it refers to the person who starts the discussion thread: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=op
    BTW, it is perfectly fine to ask the same question on other forums outside of photo.net, but I think we give better answers. :)
     
  18. I will take the OPs word that he knows the difference between oil spots, and dust spots, and no, oil spots are not normal, or acceptable. Anything arguing to the contrary is bunk . If a pattern is developing here with Nikon camera's, and I emphasize, IF, I suggest to future OPs with similar issues with D-600s, and 610s, be careful with what is, or isn't an oil spot concern. I take the oil spot issue very seriously, as oil spots on camera sensors are subjects pertaining to defective, or poor component choices, and purchasing by the manufacturer. I say this, because comments following the OPs remarks skew to sidestep the point. I would be thoroughly disappointed if I went through the D-600 oil spot debacle, then opting for the D-610, only to face the nightmare all over again. To dismiss all this to say this is life with the sensor, live with it? Well, What? Is this the nightmare on steroids?
     
  19. Don Bright[​IMG][​IMG], Jan 14, 2014; 10:15 p.m. I will take the OPs word that he knows the difference between oil spots, and dust spots,​
    Well guess which is the OP's "oil spot" and a dust spot from my D800 taken this afternoon with my 90/3.5 CF at f/16 . . . both converted to B&W . . .
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    It really doesn't make a difference which one you guess, because there's no real difference in the character between the spots that would make one an oil spot and the other a dust spot.
    The OP might be right, but unless you try to clean it or look at the spot with a sensor loupe you just can't tell from taking an image what kind of spot it is. Plus, he has only two spots that I can see on his entire 24MP sensor - that's pretty outstanding in my book as as soon as I've cleaned my sensor I still have a couple of very minor spots just like his.
     
  20. Those spots look the same as dust. You can easily have two bits of dust on your sensor at your camera's current age -
    they could have got there during packing or rubbed off from packing materials or floated into your mirror box while you
    were mounting the lens.
     
  21. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Nobody is suggesting that oil spots (or for that matter dust spots) on the sensor are acceptable. However, if it is something the owner of a new camera can clean her/himself for a few times, by all means learn how to do that. If the problem goes away, you have just saved yourself a lot of trouble. If the problem persists or the oil problem gets worse, by all means get an exchange or send it back to Nikon for repair. However, in the long run, cleaning the sensor once in a while is simply normal for ownership of any camera with interchangeable lenses.
    Nikon has been making SLRs for 5 decades. I just can't believe that they have gone through the trouble to replace the D600 with the D610 while any known problem is not resolved. I have had over a dozen Nikon SLRs over the years and none has any oil problem that I need to worry about. Clearly Nikon knows how to do this right.
    Once upon a time there was a photo.net member, who apparently had plenty of money. He owned a bunch of high-end Canon and Nikon equipment, and he kept on finding little flaws on each item he bought. As a result, regardless of whether it is a canon lens or Nikon body, he always exchanged it 2, 3 times before he found something acceptable.
    I think that kind of practice merely drives yourself crazy and generates a lot of unnecessary work for everybody. And if I were in charge of a camera store, I would put such customers on a black list and refuse their business.
     
  22. I would assume that they are dust spots unless I had decisive evidence to the contrary. Dust spots on new camera sensors are very common, but oil spots are much less common. Some dust spots look like oil spots, and vice versa.
    --Lannie
     
  23. I think the only problem, and it's not a problem as such, is the cost of sensor cleaning. Having it done commercially is very expensive and even buying the packs of suitably sized swabs mounts up. It often takes 2 or more to clean properly. It's difficult to generalize but they are ~ £3 each. Couple of packs would get you a nice, used AIS lens!
    I wonder if there's a need for a scratch-proof final surface layer like a modern lens coating? They are not indestructible, but from all accounts are way tougher than a sensor's.....but maybe that's a myth?
    Anyone remember that paint-on and peel-off stuff for cleaning camera CCDs and lenses? I got on very well with that product. I was a bit scary 'painting' your sensor, but it worked very well and was very cost effective. Worked on dust, oil and all surface contaminants. Seems to have disappeared from the market and not replaced.
     
  24. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Back in 2002 when I got my first DSLR in the Nikon D100, I was obsessive about keeping the sensor clean, but gradually I stopped doing wet cleaning on a regular basis.
    I bought my first FX DSLR in 2008 with the D700. However, it was only a few weeks ago that I bought my first set of FX-width sensor swabs. In other words, I never wet clean my D700 and D800e until recently. In these days I typically just use a blower and that was ok for like 5 years. Eventually I had some stubbon dust on my D700 sensor that I couldn't just blow away.
    As I said, don't get too obsessive about it. Usually I rarely use f16 due to diffraction concerns, especially on a high-density sensor such as those 24MP and 36MP ones. If you are the type that checks your sensors against a uniform sky at f22, you'll end up paying more for cleaning.
    Having said that, any new owners of the D600 and D610 or another model should definitely check their new cameras thoroughly. If there are persistent problems, get it exchanged or repaired under warranty while you can still do so. There is a fuzzy gray line between valid concerns and being obsessive about little issues.
     
  25. Jason, I actually just downloaded your image from Flickr and then moved it around on PS with the "hand" tool, and frankly I don''t see very much. If that is all that you can see at f/16 against the sky, then I would get on with shooting and forget about it. I routinely shoot with much more than that on the sensor, but I can't see it at the f-stops that I use. I know that you want a new sensor to be perfect, but unless it interferes with regular photography, then it is not worthy worrying about.
    I once bought a new Kodak 14n (2004), and it was the first 3:2 aspect ratio DSLR that I had shot. (I had been shooting the Olympus E-20, and that camera has a 4:3 aspect ratio.) There was a horrible agglomeration of dust or whatever along the entire right vertical side of every frame of the Kodak. It was not many pixels wide, and so I simply cropped it out and never fooled with cleaning it. People differ a lot in their tolerance of these issues. I don't worry about it unless it actually shows in regular photography.
    Oil would bother me, I have to admit, but I have never detected oil on my sensors. I have never had to do any wet cleaning, and I have had several DSLRs over the years. Luck is a factor, of course.
    --Lannie
     
  26. I too am having dust or oil spot problems with my D 610 that has about 5000-6000 clicks on it. On sky images taken at f 16, most of the spots are clustered in the upper left hand portion of the image. I believe that means that affected area of the sensor is at the bottom as there is a mirror effect.
    I did not do any sensor tests when I first got the camera so I have no comparative images to use. I am going to try a dry cleaning to see if most of the spots are removed and therefore dust (which I doubt.) They do another blue sky test at f 16. Then I am going to do a wet cleaning followed up with a blue sky test at f 16. If I still have spots, I am going to request a refund from Nikon or a credit towards a D 800. I lived through all of the oil spot issues with a D 600 and do not want to go through this all again with a D 610.
    For the record, I do not have these same sensor spot issues with my D 300s or D 700 that I still use on a regular basis.
    I will try and post a blue sky sensor image right now if anyone wants to see it.
    Joe Smith
    00cJRG-544871284.jpg
     
  27. Here is the one I wanted to attach. Joe smith
    00cJRJ-544871384.jpg
     
  28. Joseph, I think that with the D600 the actual dust problem had nothing to do with the oil problem, and thus nothing to do with the shutter. The D610 has a new shutter, but the housing probably is the same as that of the D600. (There was some speculation that with the D600 the dust came from within the camera, which would imply that over time the amount of dust would diminish and finally disappear.)
    Therefore it is quite possible that you will be getting some dust in spite of the new shutter in the D610. It will go away. Oil problems are more serious, I think, but those have (or had) apparently been remedied with the D610. I have not heard many complaints about the D610 until now, but every new camera is going to have varying amounts of dust. If your dust is manageable, then I would simply clean the dust off until the problem goes away.
    On the other hand, with the number of specks that you are showing on that second picture, I would consider sending it back. This is getting ridiculous.
    --Lannie
     
  29. Thanks Lannie, I just emailed my photo retailer for their thoughts.
    Joe Smith
     
  30. Thank you everybody for excellent comments.
    Thank you Don Bright for the comments. I do not understand why people say to clean the sensor of the brand new camera from the beginning. Do I not have the right to have the clean sensor at least at the beginning after paying 2k?
    John Hinkey, if I used the D610 for some time taking thousands of pictures and then have some spots like this, I would feel less unhappy. Why do I have to deal with cleaning the senor on the brand new camera.
    Andy L, Landrum Kelly, if the spots look like from the dust, I uploaded the D600 dirty sensor photo here
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/10394871@N02/11968883193/
    If they are not oil spots, then my D610 spots are not oil spots, which I seriously doubt.
    Shun Cheung, I do not want to be a bad customer, but I think I have the right to have a clean and good camera at least at the beginning after paying 2K.
    Landrum Kelly, there are 2 spots on near left top and center top. It is not big, but how can I be assured that there will not be much more down the road if it has already 2 within 200 click count.
    Joseph Smith, maybe we are facing the similar issue. Misery loves company, I guess. I feel that it is not just me.



    My point is why do I have to deal with this spots from the new camera where they claimed that they fixed the oil spot problems in the new D610. Another point is if I already have this problem with the spots on the sensor from the beginning, how can I be ensured that I will not have any further and more spots down the road when then it is already too late to have the camera exchanged.
    I am not familiar with cleaning the sensors with swab or wet cleaner except for Rocket Blower. I will learn when I need it after much use of DSLR, but why do I have to bother with cleaning the sensor from the brand new camera?
    Since Nikon announced that they fixed the oil issue, this is a quite a surprise to me.
    Thank you
     
  31. Jason -
    • Again - you don't know for certain that these are oil spots - they look just like typical dust spots too
    • You only have two spots on the entire image - which is actually very very good and very different from the many many oil spots typically generated by the D600 problem
    • Spots this small you only really see them at f/16 - which is typical (or at larger apertures with longer lenses that are very telecentric at larger apertures)
    • As soon as you take the body cap off and mount a lens and take an image with a new camera you are likely get some dust on the sensor - this is completely normal
    • I've cleaned my D800 many times and I've never been able to get each and every dust spot gone or if I did manage to do that a spot or two usually comes back after a bit of use. Totally normal. I try to get the "big" dust spots gone and not sweat the small ones that can barely be seen.
    • With two spots I think you are over-reacting.
    • Get it professionally cleaned if they bother you and find out if they are actually oil - you can't tell if it's an oil or dust spot by looking at the image produced by the sensor - you have to look at the sensor surface using a sensor loupe or some other appropriate sensor surface imaging tool.
    • Dust spots on a digital interchangeable lens camera are something that you will have to deal with. Either learn to clean the sensor yourself or find a place that can do it for you. Sometimes I go many months with just a few spots that are not worth cleaning, other times I need to clean it once a week because I've taken a lot of images in a really dusty place with a lot of lens changes.
     
  32. Landrum Kelly, there are 2 spots on near left top and center top. It is not big, but how can I be assured that there will not be much more down the road if it has already 2 within 200 click count.​
    If you have to go to f/16 to see two tiny spots, I just wouldn't worry about it. If it gets worse, that is another thing. Why not just go out and do some ordinary photography, with the usual range of apertures that you use? That is the best test, after all.
    --Lannie
     
  33. Isn't photography an art, and if so, are you not supposed to seek perfection?
    I do not know if I am overly picky and others do not care.
    I am kind of vacillating whether to return for exchange or not since so far it has 2 small oil spots, and I live it with. If this 2 small oil spot is rather normal for the new D610, then, there is no point for exchange since another one might have also. And I will just keep the current one.
     
  34. Okay, here's the thing. Dust happens. This is just normal with digital cameras.

    Before the D600, 99% of the DSLRs out there in use had a bit of dust. 99% of people didn't notice. Then there was one
    model that had some stuff get on the sensor, and now people are shooting blank skies at f16 and looking at the results at
    400% and think any spot means the camera is broken - but really, it's just an indication that your camera is normal.

    You've got some dust on your sensor. There are three options:
    1. Clean the sensor.
    2. Freak out.
    3. Don't shoot blank skies at f16.
     
  35. Jason, you seem to be insistent that it is oil. If those are two very small dust spots visible at f/16, then dust will not be seen for the vast majority of shots. Occasionally it is necessary to remove a dust spot on a file in Photoshop, but what you are describing will not require that. If it happens too much, it is time for a cleaning. You are definitely not anywhere near that point.
    The camera is a tool. It won't be perfect. Nor will real world photos.
    Can you not see how different your case is from Joseph's above? He may have a legitimate complaint. Since you are going to extraordinary measures just to see the slightest bit of dust, I am not sure that anyone at Nikon could take you seriously. We're not sloppy shooters here, and we're not Nikon fan boys, but we know what is important and what is not. Shoot some more before you decide to send it back. At present it would be silly to send it back. For Joseph, sending it back might indeed be the right thing to do. I am not sure, but that would be my likely choice in the same situation.
    Just shoot the darned thing in real world situations before you decide to send it back. For what it is worth, I am the one who raised the dust issue on this forum over a year ago, and I have never tried to minimize the problem, but the problem of dust must be put in some perspective.
    --Lannie
     
  36. Andy, there is another option. Get a Sigma, so there is a "shield" stopping dust from getting into the mirror box and eventually onto the sensor.
    ;)
     
  37. The buyer has the right to expect that a new machine has a clean, no signs of dust sensor, however, and as with dead pixels can probably be a minimum threshold for customer complaints and protection of the manufacturer.
    In such a case, will the manufacturer be obliged to accept the return of the equipment or can consider this as post-sales support, just cleaning the sensor?
    Who bought a D600 and returned it for fear or have had problems with oil on the sensor and did not completely overcome the situation can now run the risk of going through something like a "post-traumatic" reaction towards any other machine from the same manufacturer.
    So perhaps the most convenient would be use the "no questions asked returning policy" choosing another brand and if finding dust again to see that as a natural thing to happen and that can be solved with a sensor cleaning. Otherwise this buyer will run a serious risk of returning to the starting point.
     
  38. Scott, be careful, I think this OP might take you seriously! If he got a Sigma you'd be the only person who could answer
    his questions and you'd take the blame for every dust spot.
     
  39. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    The buyer has the right to expect that a new machine has a clean, no signs of dust sensor​
    Sure, but once you start using it, dust is simply part of reality.
    Okay, here's the thing. Dust happens. This is just normal with digital cameras.
    Before the D600, 99% of the DSLRs out there in use had a bit of dust. 99% of people didn't notice.​
    That is also normal with film cameras. Read my story with lint stuck on the shutter area on my F5 that affected every image from a week-long trip above.
    It is not really 99% of the DSLRs have a bit of dust. It is more like 100%.
    Isn't photography an art, and if so, are you not supposed to seek perfection?​
    You should seek perfection in your final output, namely your images. Not the tools you use. A lot of great photographers use cameras and lenses full of ware and dings. Serious dust on the sensor can affect your final image, so you definitely want to clean those. If you are going to capture images of a uniform sky at f22 on a daily basis to check for dust, you will drive yourself crazy pretty soon, just like that guy who exchanges every camera and every lens he buys 2, 3 times. I have seen his images showing "defects" from his new lens; I thought the images looked fine, and I think I am already picky about equipment.
     
  40. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    As part of my up-coming Nikon Df review, I have been capturing images of the camera and lens themselves.
    Attached is an image comparing the three different Nikon 50mm AF-S lenses. I used a Nikon D700 (not D600 or D610; I own neither one) with a 60mm/f2.8 AF-S macro at f22 and three flashes. I am attaching a large image so that it will show up as a link.
    I wet clean that D700's sensor about 3 weeks ago and I only use that camera indoors at home since then, with fewer than 100 actuations. However, you can easily see dust spots all over the place over a white background @ f22, which I used to gain depth of field.
    I should point out that another major headache with this type of product photography is dust on the subjects. Frequently, I have wiped the lenses and cameras as well as use a blower to blow away any dust on the surface, but I still end up using the healing brush to do some clean up in PhotoShop.
    00cJaF-544889684.jpg
     
  41. Isn't photography an art, and if so, are you not supposed to seek perfection?​
    Yes, but in this case perfection is unobtainable and you must face the realities of digital sensors - they get dusty and you have to clean them. Your two spots are not out of the ordinary by any measure.
    I do not know if I am overly picky and others do not care.​
    Yes, you are being overly picky and others do care since they are taking the time to respond to your posts.
    I am kind of vacillating whether to return for exchange or not since so far it has 2 small oil spots, and I live it with. If this 2 small oil spot is rather normal for the new D610, then, there is no point for exchange since another one might have also. And I will just keep the current one.​
    Once again - you have no idea if these are oil spots so I would highly suggest you quit calling them that. I would be thrilled if that's the only spots I had on my sensor.
    Either return/exchange it or go find someone that can look at the sensor, see what kind of particles they are and have it professionally cleaned.
    There are a lot of experienced digital photographers giving you really good advice, but you seem to not want to take it.
     
  42. When I had my D700 I had a real continuing dust problem that I thought would be even worse when I got my D800, but Nikon used some magic engineering I suppose as I've had far far less dust issues with the 36MP sensor of the D800 than the 12MP sensor of my long-since-sold D700. This in spite of tons of dust particles inside my mirror box of the D800.
    I've been really impressed with my m43 gear where the sensor is exposed directly all the time - I hardly ever get even a singe speck of dust on my 3 cameras.
     
  43. Thank you all for your comments.
    I usually shoot landscape and portrait. If I shoot landscape, I use f16 many times during the day and if I do, the sky is usually at top area of the photo. Then, the spots on the top will be visible and will be a bother to me.
    My original question is to D610 owners to see if they see spots like this on the brand new D610. I did not want any genralized comments on DSLR sensors. I know over time, there will be spots and dusts, but not from the beginning. If other D610 owners have these as mine, I just settle for Nikon rather un-superior product quality and unfulfilled promise. Otherwise, if no other D610 owners have this, then mine is not normal. That is what I wanted to find out.
    Thank you for your comments.
     
  44. Jason, the advice you've been getting is sound, as it applies to all interchangeable lens cameras, and your D60 is an
    interchangeable lens camera.

    People who shoot landscape regularly with high res cameras clean their sensors all the time. I know guys who do it every
    time they go out and shoot. I think that might be overkill, but you're complaining about TWO dust spots. Two! Either clean
    them or spot then in post or ignore them, but if your approach is to pretend that the existence of dust in the world is
    attributable to Nikon and become indignant as a consumer you're not going to get much done.
     
  45. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    If I shoot landscape, I use f16 many times during the day and if I do​
    And at f16 and 24MP, diffraction is going to affect sharpness on every one of those images.
     
  46. If you are shooting f/16 with good glass, in most cases you are negating the value of the glass. Anything past f/5.6 or f/8 is rarely necessary in landscape photography with 35mm format.
    --Lannie
     
  47. You know what's weird Lannie? For some reason I seem to get my best results at f8 and f11. Sometimes I shoot at f16, but like you're saying, it seems like the photos are slightly softer, presumably because of diffraction. I wish I had a couple of zooming tilt-shift (perspective control) lenses. A 15-24mm f2.8 PC and a 35-70mm f2.8 PC would be awesome! (as long as they're super sharp at f5.6) It would be nice to have image stabilization too, like in a Sony A99. In fact, maybe a set of auto-focus Zeiss zooming PC lenses in Sony mount on a couple of Sony A99 cameras would be the answer! ;)
     
  48. Just clean the sensor and move on !! thanks.
     
  49. Help please.
    I purchased a Nikon D610 through Amazon 11 months ago.
    Recently, I began shooting sunsets and in post processing noticed a great deal of dust and/or oil around the corners of the image. I looked at earlier images and noticed the problem had started about 5-6 months after I purchased the camera. I am very careful with my camera and could not image how this was happening.
    Nikon recommended I had the camera cleaned at one of their authorized repair shops, which I did. However, the technician said the sensor was scratched and wondered if I bought a used camera.
    I bought the camera new directly from Amazon. No one before this technician had been anywhere near the sensor. Other than the camera self-cleaning, the sensor had never been touched. I never allowed anyone to use my camera and kept the 28-300 lens attached most of the time. All this to say, damage could only have been caused by either Nikon, Amazon or the Nikon authorized repair shop.
    I immediately told Nikon about the scratched sensor, and the fact that the dust/oil problem returned two weeks after Nikon's authorized repair shop had cleaned the sensor. Nikon asked me to send the camera to them for repair.
    I paid about $70 to return the camera and I expected Nikon to honor its warranty, but it is now demanding $680 to repair the scratched sensor. I did not touch the sensor, so why does Nikon want me to pay for repairing it?
    00csOo-551661784.jpg
     
  50. I'd go and find one of the earliest JPEGs you can find from this camera and determine the shuttercount.
    Then I'd import it into something like PS and increase the contrast to try and see the early muck....you may see evidence of the scratch if it was there then too.
    Equally, go and find the 2 frames either side of the technician's cleaning and inspect them for evidence.
     
  51. ib, I can't tell anything about what your problem is from that image - it doesn't look unusual at this low resolution - but Mike's got the obvious answer. Figure out the date you had the camera cleaned and look at close ups of images from immediately before and after. If you can find evidence of a scratch after but not before, you know the technician damaged the camera. OTOH, if you see that your first shot with the camera had more than a few dozen shutter count, it might have been used before you bought it. (It's normal to have some shutter count, because the camera may have some tests done at the factory.) When you bought it from Amazon, was it actually sold by Amazon from Amazon's new inventory or was it sold through an Amazon page by a 3rd party seller?
    Since a scratch on a sensor would be the sort of thing normally caused by user carelessness, and the camera is 11 months old, I don't think it's unreasonable for Nikon to all this a repair of a damaged product rather than a warranty service.
     

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