I'm scared because my pop-up flash wont pop up!

Discussion in 'Canon EOS' started by fischerphotos, Jun 6, 2009.

  1. I just got my 40D last week and was so excited. So far i've taken photos with it everyday and I have used the pop-up flash before. Now when I try to pop it up, it makes this loud clicking noise 3 times and an error 5 pops up saying, "The built-in flash's auto pop-up was obstructed. Turn the power off then on again" I did that and it does the same thing each time. Can someone help me!
     
  2. This has happened to others on xxD models. I found that if I was prepared ahead of time with a fingernail under the rim of the supposedly "pop=up" flash, I could "assist" it a little at the first click and it would pop up. I put a tiny, really tiny, amount of graphite and watch oil (NOT 3-in-1 or some such) on the catches on the camera body proper and worked them a little, and the problem has not re-occurred.
    I reiterate, do NOT flood the area with any kind of heavy oil or other fluid. If you don't have any watch/camera oil, just use a little solvent like naphtha (AKA "naptha" or lighter fluid) might work with a little dry graphite from a locksmith. The amount needed will be minute and can be transferred to the area on the point of a pin, repeated if necessary.
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  3. Had same problem with my XXD camera. Problem solved by putting a little pressure horizontally to the pop-up flash using your left hand. i.e., when holding camera in landscape orientation and I hear that first "loud click", i just nudge the popup with my left hand towards my right hand. It's a simple slight misalignment that causes the pop-up release to catch on something and not beable to release the pop-up flash. Every one might be different though so might want to try pushing the opposite direction too. Now it's a habbit of doing a slight push before even engaging the pop-up and the problem has never happened again.
     
  4. Thank you so much guys. JDM, I really didn't want to oil anything because I knew I would screw somthing up :) Daniel, TTTTHHHHHAAAAANNNNKKK YYYOOOUUU! I had to stick my nail under the left side and after it clicked I pushed to the right. I took some photos, the flash works fine. I closed it and it pops right up everytime. Thanks.......
     
  5. I had the same problem with my Elan II years ago. The clicking sound reminded me of a Time-bomb about to go off. So I sent the camera to a shop that specializes in Canon camera repairs. They have been in business for fifty years. Results, they held my camera for 6 1/2 weeks until the parts came in, meanwhile photo ops were flying by my face. When I finally got the camera back it cost me $150. About a month later, the clicking sound started up again and the pop-up flash would not pop up ! If you are still under warranty I would recomed you get an entire new camera.
     
  6. Glad to know that you are back in business, Colton.
    My preferred lubricant for dealing with this sort of problem is dry PTFE lubricant, which is made for lubricating cycle chains for use under dry conditions and can be obtained from any good cycle dealers. It is essential to make sure that you get the dry PTFE lubricant and not the wet lubricant, which is quite unsuitable. In the bottle, it is a clear liquid with a whitish solid layer in the lower half, and has to be shaken for a long time to mix the solid (PTFE) part with the carrier liquid. Very small quantities can then be applied exactly where you want them with the tip of a jeweller's screwdriver. The liquid part evaporates almost immediately, leaving a dry layer of PTFE which does the job, so the risk of anything going where you don't want it is negligible. I first learned of the use of this in the instructions I found for lubricating my LS-30 film scanner, and I use it for preventing Canon bayonet hoods from binding.
     
  7. Good to know in case this happens in the future!
     
  8. I've had this as well on a 40D. Some spilled sugary drink was the culprit. Assisting the flash with a knife blade and then cleaning with a cotton tip did the job.
    It doesn't have to be a lubrication issue, is what I wanted to add to the useful tips already here.
    Allard
     

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