I continue to be plagued by.................

Discussion in 'Digital Darkroom' started by walter_strong|5, Jun 1, 2009.

  1. ...............images that're too big to send by e-mail without producing a HUGE image. I'd like to be able to use the large file size in in 40D and through some mechanization end up with images that are easily e-mailed and produce an image size that does not require the use of sliders to see the whole picture. Am I chasing a pipe dream?
     
  2. Photoshop, "save for web". Or write an action to change to 8 bit, flatten layers,resize to 100 PPI and 700 px wide for landscape.
    You will need to have archived the edited photo in .psd format so you do not deminish the original.
     
  3. Toby, man you are talk'n about skills and software I can only dream about.
     
  4. Photoshop trying to force you to save every damn file as a .psd file even when previous files have been saved as .jpgs. Annoys the living crappers out of me.
     
  5. A simplest approach for you may be to find the file within Windows (use Windows Explorer), right click on it and you will be prompted about down-sizing or leaving original-sized to email.
     
  6. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    resize to 100 PPI​
    No. This is pointless and does nothing. Images sent by email have pixels, not inches, so PPI is meaningless.
    Walter, what software are you using? It will be easier to explain it if you let us know.
     
  7. Get Irfanview or ACDSee.
     
  8. The only photo editing software I have on my hard drive is Picture Window Pro.
     
  9. Mendel, I'll check those out. Thank you.
     
  10. Save files as TIF, and it will not force you to save as a PSD.
    If you have used layers, make sure to flatten or merge them first and it wont make you save it as a PSD.
    For emailing change them to 8bit, save file to longest dimention of a JPG about 1680pixels wide, with 300 pixels per inch. (Maximum screen resolution for most.) It even works for my brother who has dial up speeds.
    It means a good high quality file relatives and family they can print if they want, but reduces the size so it is manageable in email. For posting on facebook or other websites, I make the longest dimension, quality of 10 and 750 pixels on widest edge with 72 pixels per inch.
     
  11. Buy Lightroom.
    Import images from camera.
    Adjust the ones you want to use.
    Export as JPEGs to the size you want.
    This is not difficult.
     
  12. Thank you Godfrey.
     
  13. Jeff Spirer every photo has PPI or Pixels per inch.
    You can make it 300 or 250 or 200 or 100 or 72 or even 25 ppi...
    The hight and width may be in pixels, but it is also in the number of Pixels per inch... which gives you the _resolution_ of the image. The lower the number of pixels per inch, the lower the resolution. Computer screens are commonly 72 ppi, which reduces the size of the file. But, the greater the ppi, the greater the resolution of the image.
     
  14. Robert: Not really, no. An image on your computer screen is some number of pixels wide, and some number of pixels tall. That's it. The screen resolution is the screen resolution. Period. The PPI/DPI info that's encoded into the file is just some meta information that might be used by some other processes (usually related to printing). But the ONLY thing that matters about display on screen is pixels wide, and pixels tall.

    Walter: try Google's free Picassa program. Perfectly adequate for downsizing copies of your image files for e-mail and web use.
     
  15. Robert, as Jeff stated, pixels per inch is a totally meaningless measure. Picture width/height in pixels only is the only true measurement of a digital files. Getting into pixels per inch only confuses people who are trying to understand digital files.
     
  16. The problem with Picassa is that my images have to be stored in Picassa. Then when I try to find them through Picture Window Pro there is no way to access them.
     
  17. Here's what I do to put photos in emails. They appear in the email and do not have to be opened like attachments.
    1. Bring the photo into your photo editing program. It doesn't much matter which one. I use Photoshop Elements 5. Nor does it does it matter whether the file is a jpeg, tif, or psd.
    2. Don't worry about dpi or ppi. The only thing that matters is the size of the image in pixels. Resize the image to about 400 pixels wide (any where from 350 to 500 works well.)
    3. Select the image (cntrl A in Photoshop), copy it (cntrl C), then paste it directly into your email. That's it. BUT DON'T save the resized image overwriting your original. This works with my email client, but may not with some web emails. But give it a try.
     
  18. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    Jeff Spirer every photo has PPI or Pixels per inch.
    You can make it 300 or 250 or 200 or 100 or 72 or even 25 ppi...
    The hight and width may be in pixels, but it is also in the number of Pixels per inch... which gives you the _resolution_ of the image. The lower the number of pixels per inch, the lower the resolution. Computer screens are commonly 72 ppi, which reduces the size of the file. But, the greater the ppi, the greater the resolution of the image.​
    This is all nonsense and should be ignored. The only resolution for an image is pixel dimensions. PPI is simply header information that applies when being output to a print device.
    Also, the comment on screens is incorrect.

    For Walter: You absolutely don't need to buy Lightroom. You can use Picture Window Pro. I haven't tried it for a while, but there should be a "resize" capability. Resize to have the long side around 800 pixels and let the other side fall wherever. Then do a save and it should ask you for jpeg quality when you do that. Set the quality to mid-range. Then you have a photo that is fine for emailing. Once you have done it a few times, you can start playing around with pixel dimensions and the jpeg quality, but for now, this will give you a decent start. Lightroom won't make your emailed photos any better.
     
  19. Then do a save ...

    Careful! Do a Save As (to a new files) so that you don't ever over-write your original files.
     
  20. Howdy!
    A free membership on mailbigfile.com allows you to send just about any picture at full resolution. A pro membership allows you to send up to 2 gigbytes at a time, and it's relatively inexpensive. It get's around the mailbox size limits common on hotmail and other accounts.
    Later,
    Paulsky
     
  21. I use the lightroom option previously suggested. It works good.
    There is a cheaper solution but it takes some learning. Cheaper as in free.
    1. Load Active Perl.
    2. There are 1 or 2 perl libraries out there that deal with JPEG files. (I don't remember there names off the top but with a little googling they could be found.) These will need to be loaded too.
    3. find and load a perl script that uses the above libraries to resize the pics.
    I generated such a perl script years back but stopped using it when I got lightroom. A programming background helps but not required, all the info you need is avaiable on the web (like a giant library). Perl, its additional libraries and tons of scripts can be gotten from the web for free. Except for perl itself, most are scripts (source) so you don't have to worry about virii. Perl is checksummed so you can tell if it is good (not tampered with).
     
  22. @Jeff Spirer:
    You are confusing Pixels Per Inch (PPI) with Dots Per Inch (DPI).
    Monitors and similar electronic displays use PPI. Printers use DPI.
    PPI should not be ignored when resizing for web display any more than DPI should be ignored when sending an image file to a specific printer. Most monitors can only resolve 72PPI - sending anything higher is a waste. DPI, on the other hand, if device specific - try sending a 72DPI file to an inkjet printer and you'll end up with a fuzzy image. HP and Canon printers want 300DPI for best results; Epson printers want 360DPI. Photo labs vary from 200-425 DPI, depending on the printer the lab uses.
    FWIW, The human eye can resolve around 212PPI.
     
  23. If anyone hasn't replied about resizing in PWP, here's how:
    Open the image in PWP
    Go to the Transformation menu, to the Geometry part of it and select Resize.
    This puts you in the Resize dialogue. Under width put however many pixels wide you want the image...maybe 400 to 600 pixels for an email. Towards the bottom of the dialogue, in the Preserve field, Proportions should be selected and Bicubic should be selected in the Interpolation Method field. Both these are, I think, the defaults. At the bottom there's a Sharpening field. It probably defaults to something like 15 or 20%, which is ok.
    Select OK and it is done.
    It probably is wise to convert the image to jpg, if it isn't one already. So, select Save As from the File menu, and select jpeg from the drop down list in the dialogue. It may want to convert some things to comply with jpeg standards (like 8bit if your image is 16bit). Select OK. Then it will popup the quality slider. Set to, say, 60%. The Color Sampling field can be set to 4.1.1 for best quality.
    Save and attach to email.
    Good Luck
    None of this applies to raw images, of course.
     
  24. Oh, and good luck, Jeff :cool:
     
  25. Walter,
    Why not simply use Canon's Digital Photo Professional (DPP) that came with your camera? To re-size using DPP open the DPP program then open the folder where your image(s) is and select it by clicking-on it. The selected image will have a yellow border around it. From the File drop-down menu choose Convert and Save. A dialog box will open. In the Save As: row give it a name or leave it with the image number, your choice. Where: choose Desktop or some other easy to find file. Kind: Exif-JPEG; Image Quality: 8 is fine for email. Output setting: skip this for emailing. Resize setting: Click-on the Resize box to select it. Change Width to 700; Height will be determined automatically as long as the Lock Aspect Ratio box is checked. The Unit measurement to use is PIXEL. Click Save and you're done.
     
  26. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    PPI should not be ignored when resizing for web display any more than DPI should be ignored when sending an image file to a specific printer. Most monitors can only resolve 72PPI​
    This is nonsense. Monitors display pixels, not inches. PPI/DPI, it doesn't matter, in the header file it's usually called DPI and it's irrelevant.
    sending anything higher is a waste.​
    Actually it's exactly the same size file regardless of what you put in the field.

    try sending a 72DPI file to an inkjet printer and you'll end up with a fuzzy image.​
    Exactly. Printers use inches. Monitors do not.
    Oh, and good luck, Jeff :cool:
    I need it. It's amazing that people still don't get this.
    Nobody should ever pay attention to the 72 number. When you display on a screen, only the pixel dimensions matter.
     
  27. As a professional wedding photographer, I really can't go emailing over 1,000 6mb files to a customer. I upload all my edited images in full resolution to my pro account at smugmug.com where they may be displayed at various resolutions and downloaded at those sizes as well as the full resolution image. You can see what I am talking about on my account there ... http://ibd-designs.smugmug.com. Also, if you want to get a discount on joining smugmug, you can use my coupon code: tzuOgkf1Q1pBk

    Another quick and dirty way of downsizing photos is photoshop's automated web gallery tool. You can specify the pixel dimensions of the large images as well as the thumbnails. I just generate the gallery and delete all but the images folder. Then I just use those files as a low-resolution version suitable for email.
     
  28. An image, set to 5 PPI:
    [​IMG]
    Same image, set to 1,000 PPI:
    [​IMG]
    Which one looks better?
     
  29. The middle one looks the best.
     
  30. Or you could simply send the full sized file using this site:
    http://www.filemail.com/
    You can send files up to 2 Gigabytes in size. It is free.
     
  31. Most people don't want to receive files that are several megabytes in size and require scrolling. The question wasn't "how do I send huge files?"
     
  32. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    The files aren't even emailed with that site. It sends a link to download from. It's just ftp, not email.
    And Mike is right, most people want email files that are small and manageable.
     
  33. OK, I followed Don E's instructions for resizing in PWP and its working perfectly. I'd tried that before but was attempting to put in new figures using the calculater keypad and of course that didn't work. I appreciate everybody's input.
     
  34. Why not? Isn't your NUM LOCK on?
     
  35. Gimp? http://www.gimp.org
    An example save for web plugin for gimp: http://registry.gimp.org/node/33
     
  36. Use the free software that came with the camera. I'm not sure where the resize function is in Canon DPP, but in Zoombrowser (which Canon includes with their compacts) it's under export. I find 600 to 800 pixels the wide dimension works well for email and the web.
     
  37. Brad i like the second one better ; )
    What is the purpose of you sending big image? to be print or just to be seen on screen?
    You can go to image size in Ps and enter 800 pix wide let say, so your image will look big, will not be huge in size, will probably dont need the use of the slider to see it full.
     
  38. I need it. It's amazing that people still don't get this.
    Nobody should ever pay attention to the 72 number. When you display on a screen, only the pixel dimensions matter.​
    Like sRGB for web, Like not all printing method need 300ppi, Like my uncalibrated monitor dont look like my print...i know and understand your suffering ; )
     
  39. Brad, that 's a cool shot!
     
  40. If you use Windows XP or Vista you probably have Windows Pictures manager a free bee. See picture, click edit and choose a predefined size that suits your needs. Its no photo shopo or light room but if you can not aford these then it will do to send an email picture to a friend.
    00TXOW-140147584.jpg
     
  41. Ignore the DPI stuff. As Jeff says, total nonsense. It controls the size the photo will be went sent to a PRINTER. I has no effect whatsoever on screen display.
    Also, for god's sake ignore the person who told you to buy Lightroom. You have all you need. Picture Window Pro is a professional caliber graphics program. It's damn near as good as Photoshop, and better at some things. Figure out how to use it to resize images.
     
  42. [[The problem with Picassa is that my images have to be stored in Picassa. Then when I try to find them through Picture Window Pro there is no way to access them.]]
    I'm not entirely sure what you mean by this. If the photos are stored on your computer then they are accessable by many means.
    If you mean "I made updates to images in Picasa but those updates are not reflected in PWP" then there are two solutions:
    1. In Picasa click on "Save To Disk" in the library view (there will be a Save To Disk" button for every folder you've worked). This will do two things: First, Picasa will create an "Originals" folder under the folder you're working it. Into it it will move the original JPG file. Second, Picasa will create a new JPG file where the previous one existed. This will have the changes you made with Picasa.
    Picasa's goal is to be non-destructive with editing. If you want to revert back, it will use the Originals folder to bring back the image you downloaded from the camera.
    2. In Picasa click on "Export." Pick a size (by pixels) and click ok. It will make a copy of the original file, resized to your specification, and place it in the directory you specify. The default is probably your desktop.
     
  43. "OK, I followed Don E's instructions for resizing in PWP and its working perfectly."
    Excellent, Walter. I didn't mention to rename the image when you save as, but someone else did. Renaming (but not the .jpg part) prevents overwriting the file you opened in the editor.
    May I offer some advice? Although you are not a beginner in photography, it seems you are one when it comes to the computer-side of photography. I recommend you post those kinds of questions to the Beginners forum rather than this one. The reason being there are way less odds of getting bad advice; the moderator will be on the lookout for such and delete or correct those responses. There has been a lot of irrelevant or bad advice offerred in this thread.
    Good luck.
     
  44. images that're too big to send by e-mail without producing a HUGE image.​
    Have you considered using file splitter? There are many file splitter utilities to split Jpeg or mpeg files into manageable sizes for emailing and rejoin back together at the other end. I have done this for 30MB panoramas that I wanted to send to a friend who would like to view them in detail. Just do a Google search or go to Cnet.com; there are a bunch of utilities to split and join large files.
    Joe
     
  45. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator


    There are many file splitter utilities to split Jpeg or mpeg files into manageable sizes for emailing and rejoin back together at the other end.​
    Did you read the question? This is what he wants to do (and has now been able to do):
    produce an image size that does not require the use of sliders to see the whole picture​
    It doesn't sound to me like he wants to reassemble a huge image at the other end.
     
  46. This is a a very entertaining thread. My fave post (so far) is the one recommending using Perl to resize. Just the thing for the naive computer-user.
    Keep 'em coming. It's a slow day here.
    .
     
  47. Got Paintbrush?
     
  48. The easiest of all in WinXP/2000 is the Image Resizer Powertoy (can be downloaded from Microsoft):
    Once installed, right click on the image, go to resize, select size and there it is! You can even select multiple images at once.
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    What could be easier?
     
  49. 1) Fire up your Mac.
    2) Use iPhoto (included).
    3) Share > email > resizing choices presented automatically, fires up email program. Multiple at a time if you wish.
    Original file is retained, different sizes for different folks in each email, no strain.
    Graphic converter is also awesome.
     
  50. I cannot believe how many people ignore the fact that Walter said he only has Picture Window Pro (a very capable program) and that some respondents "are talk'n about skills and software I [i.e. Walter] can only dream about." Then they blather on about what they would do with software that Walter doesn't have.
    Walter, those who wrote specifically about what to do using Picture Window Pro gave you good advice. I can only guess why the others gave you next-to-useless advice.
     
  51. Waldo, I've been following exactly what you discussed. I do appreciate everybody's efforts to help but people do need to read the original post carefully. Yes, I'm truely a computer wuss but finally I've mastered a task I've needed to get on top of for a LONG time. Most of my photos are scanned prints and therefore are automatically sized properly for e-mailing, at least with the equipment I've used. However, when I bought my first digital SLR things started to get dicey but now its beginning to iron out. Again, thanks for all the help.
     
  52. So what I gather from the length of this thread is that I'm not alone in my confusion over this.
    Anyone who's ever gone into Photoshop's Image Size... and watched what happens to the numbers when you enter numbers first before clicking or unclicking the resample box and notice the "Pixel Dimensions:" in MB (oh, that's intuitive) go up or down will see what I mean about why this crap is so confusing and hard to remember.
    The first number you look at that makes sense is the Document size in inches and it is usually very large. We have no concept of what size a pixel really measures because usually the ppi is either set at 72 which looks real small or 240 which looks right for printing.
    But printers don't print in pixels. They use dithered dots that interpret the pixel grid pattern within the image file we can't see on paper until we reduce the resolution to a ppi somewhere under 150 to see this grid and the stairsteps it produces to hard edged detail.
    Also the size of the file in MB shown in Image Size... is the uncompressed size with regards to jpeg. The size of the file on your hard drive will be much smaller and no one knows which number size will show up in the download progress bar in their browser or email box if provided.
     
  53. Walter,
    Don E covered your question brilliantly, but FYI, you can get answers to questions that deal directly with Picture Windo Pro at:
    http://www.dl-c.com/board/
    Click on the Support option and you can ask questions if you are registered, or you can search the archives, which is what I do. I can always find the answer to my PWP questions that way. You can also get access to all of the manuals there as well. There are a lot of people there that know everything about the program. I visit the forum daily to learn something new.
     
  54. to resize for the web. the simplest solutiuon is the one i use and i use it because it is simple.
    go to microsoft's website, the page you want is-
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/digitalphotography/learnmore/tips/eschelman2.mspx
    simply install it. then when you right click on a image there is a choice called "Resize Picture". simply select the size you wish and the program gives it to you. the only thing you jhave to sure of if the pic is for the web is change it to jpeg first. i have a folder on my desktop lab;e "Resized Pics" inside are 3 folders labeled small medium large these contain the results of the resize program.
     
  55. note- if i am going to do the resizing to batch of pics i use Irfanview to change then to jpeg first then use the resizer to change to the size wanted, or use irfanview to change them to the jpeg and size wanted directly. your choice.
     

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