How to mount a foam core board upright?

Discussion in 'Lighting Equipment' started by kah_hoe_wan, Dec 5, 2011.

  1. I have seen photographers using some type of stand to mount one piece of foam core board upright. Does anyone know what and were I can get one of these stands?
    I am not talking about v-flats, which are similar, two piece of foam board taped together like a "V".
    Any suggestions?
     
  2. First, get an Avenger foam fork. Like this.

    You'll notice that it has a 5/8" pin - a standard lighting gear mounting stud. Which means you can use the always-incredibly-useful Super Clamp to attach it to pretty much anything (a boom, the vertical portion of a stand, etc - to say nothing about tree branches, book shelves, table edges, backdrop cross poles - whatever you like). Which means it's up to you on the stand part ... but a decent C-Stand is my favorite when working with stuff like that. There are jillions of variations to choose from. I happen to like Avenger stands, myself.

    You could go with a C-Stand like this one, noting that it has a grip head on the end of that 40" boom arm. Presto, you can attach the foam fork right to the grip head, and you won't need the super clamp at all. The height, reach (if boomed), portability, stability, and all of that are goind to vary wildly with your shooting circumstances.

    Needless to say, you could also rig something like this up with simple A-clamps from the hardware/art store, and some sections of stiff, heavy wire (like from a wire coat hanger). But one you use the real tool, it's kind of hard to go back. If you end up using larger pieces of foam core or styrene, the heavier-duty tool (like the Avenger fork, above) is going to be way more useful than anything you're likely to rig up from odds and ends. Not cheap, of course, but neither is your time.
     
  3. Thank you Matt for your extensive write up. But I am looking for other alternatives as I already have your suggestions in mind.
    Reading my earlier post I realize I was not understanding.
    The thing I am refering to isn't a regular stand that can double use for mounting strobes/grips/flags,etc.
    Its purpose is solely to make the foam core stand upright. What I have seen is that the thing is know less then 6 to 10 inches high. Two of these would suffice in holding the board still. Now I have no clue whats it called.
     
  4. Can you describe what you've seen. If it's not something similar to a light stand, is it something more like a bracket? I'm imaging a flat metal plate with an upright slot that the foamcore would slide into, maybe one at each end. But what Matt describes is the standard practice -- the various Bogen/Manfrotto clips that attach to just about any kind of light stand. You can also use gaffer tape to hold it to a stand. Depends on whehter you need it to look pretty or just work.
     
  5. Have the things you've seen involved sticking the board on spikes, or are they something that clamps onto the board from the sides?

    How about something like this?

    Or get creative, and use some extra pieces at the base as shims, and try something like this.
     
  6. Yes Matt. This is what I am looking for. Seeing it up close now makes me realize I can probably make something like this. Thanks Matt.
     
  7. gdw

    gdw

    A lot of photographers simply use two alligator clamps. Just clamp at right angles on either side. They are available from Home Depot for a buck or two each (green handle, not the orange handle). They also have lots of other uses. I always carry a bunch with me.
     
  8. @Gary. Oh wow. I never thought to use that. I just tried it, and it works for what I need done. Thanks
     
  9. I am glad that I didn't have to suggest: 4 bricks, cinder blocks, or concrete masonary units. LOL Seriously though, there are many ways to achieve a goal and it is important that a solution always be fit for purpose. The photonet forums are always a good source for various solutions.
     
  10. My impression is that an alligator clamp is not so stable as for instance a metal G clamp or F clamp which has some weight to withstand accident? :) I have some large plain metal clamps like alligators and also have glued wooden extensions to spring clothes pegs for holding things some way inside the model when modelling. a pretty stable way would be to just have a strut instead of the V arrangement, perhaps using builders glue such as wall boards are glued to wooden framing of a house. Gluing strut and board together with a canvas hinge?
     
  11. The trade shoe item Matt pointed to appears to be perfect for that purpose, and Gary and Allen's ideas would work. But when I've used foam core as a reflector in photography, I've often needed to angle it either up or down, and sometime to have it elevated closer to the subject's face rather than on the floor. For that, you're back to a light stand.
     
  12. Lean it against a tripod or chair. If want to fix in place, an A clamp will do the trick. Doesnt have to be a fancy stand if you are using for fill. This presumes it is indoors. Outdoors with mild breeze, 2 stands and A clamps on both sides maybe some sandbags. I have several of the Home Depot green A clamps. They are like gaffers tape, dont leave home without them. Always some in the bottom of my rolling golf case/light stand/small stuff holder.
     
  13. If you only want to support a large foamcore flat in an upright position, than many solutions can work.
    If you want to be able to control the angle of the refleced surface, especially a larger flat, it is hard to avoid using stands and something like the less expensive Impact Super clamp, doubled up to allow rotation. The Impact Super Clamp is $20 at B&H, and four of them would only be $80. They come with leveling wedges in order to grab a flat surface like a foamcore flat. I use this for both angle controlled foamcore and other flats like the Scrim Jims.
    -Marc
     
  14. If you only want to support a large foamcore flat in an upright position, than many solutions can work.
    If you want to be able to control the angle of the refleced surface, especially a larger flat, it is hard to avoid using stands and something like the less expensive Impact Super clamp, doubled up to allow rotation. The Impact Super Clamp is $20 at B&H, and four of them would only be $80. They come with leveling wedges in order to grab a flat surface like a foamcore flat. I use this for both angle controlled foamcore and other flats like the Scrim Jims.
    -Marc
     
  15. I've been looking for something as well, and just found these--exactly what I wanted! I may order a set.
    http://foamcorestands.com/foamcorestands/
     
  16. Some good ideas here, thanks
     

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